• Report: #453440

Complaint Review: 5/3 Bank

  • Submitted: Tue, May 19, 2009
  • Updated: Tue, May 19, 2009

  • Reported By:Naples Florida
5/3 Bank
53bank.com Naples, Florida U.S.A.

5/3 Bank I thought I was the only one being ripped off! Naples Florida

*Consumer Suggestion: How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

*Consumer Suggestion: How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

*Consumer Suggestion: How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

*Consumer Comment: This IS your son's fault...

*Consumer Comment: Good Learning Experience...

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In August of 2008, when my son left for college, I gave him my 5/3 bank debit card to use because I did not use that account very much. I told him to be very careful and to always check the balance before using it, because, I told him that I did not want to pay 20 to 30 dollars in overdraft fees, like some other banks charge but I found out the hard way that 5/3 Bank does not do things that way.

I had to pay 246 dollars for a 17 dollar pizza, why? because of the way they do things, I do not remember very well all the specifics but after finding out that they charge a ridiculus amount for every day that you are overdraft, every day! who does that? it angers me to pay 20 or 30 dollars, so just imagine how I felt when I found out it was 246 dollars.

It was not my son's fault, he checked his balance and he thought he was safe, when I talked to somebody at the bank they told not to go by their on-line service, then why offer it! Was I ripped off, I think so now, but now my son does not have the 5/3 card anymore, he has a Bank of America card now and so far so good.

What can we, as consumers, do to prevent this from happening again and again. I have been reading all these reports and I am amaze that so many people have been victimized by this bank. I thought 20 dollars for an overdraft was too much, I think 7 to 10 dollars would be fair, but all these people are talking about hundreds of dollars!. You know what, I still have that account at 5/3, but tomorrow I will close it.

Thank you all for opening my eyes.

Freddy
Naples, Florida
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 05/19/2009 03:44 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/53-Bank/Naples-Florida-34102/53-Bank-I-thought-I-was-the-only-one-being-ripped-off-Naples-Florida-453440. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Consumer Suggestion

How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

The reality is that using an account register and reconciling that register with a monthly account statement from the bank will prevent any account holder from causing any NSF/OD fees.

The majority (if not all) of the reports I've read about NSF/OD fees have common behaviors of the account holders:

using atm cards for everyday purchases.
using more than ONE card attached to the account (husband and wife)
using atm cards for online purchases.
using atm cards for 'auto-bill pay' (autodebits)
relying upon telephone or online account balances to determine what money is available for that shopping trip to Walmart.
*NOT using an account register.
*not reconciling an account register with the scheduled monthly account statement generated by the bank.

Ways to avoid these NSF/OD fees:

1. Use an account register and reconcile the account register with a monthly written statement generated by the bank. If the bank is not mailing statements, contact customer service to have monthly statements MAILED to you.

1a. Be aware of ATM fees, such as the 'non-bank ATM fee' that most banks charge when you use an ATM that is not owned by your bank to make a withdrawal and post that fee in your account register immediately.

1b. Also be aware of any monthly 'account service fee' charged by your bank and post that to your register on the appropriate date.

2. Do NOT GIVE bank account information (or ATM card info) to any merchant, service provider, utility, online service to pay for services and goods. Use a REAL credit card for this purpose (either secured cc or unsecured cc.) Do not setup any automatic deposit to an account that is attached to said cc-NO auto payments to CC company-mail a check each month. If the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna have a host of problems and risk OD/NSF fees.

3. Do NOT use an ATM card for everyday expenses-USE CASH. Establish a monthly budget and withdrawal a weekly 'allowance' for every day expenses such as 'milk and bread' from the corner store, Burger King, etc. This will reduce the amount of transactions on the bank account which in turn makes RECONCILING the account and detecting ERRORS easier to accomplish. Again, if the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna risk NSF/OD fees.

4. Do not shop with the ATM card-use a real credit card. A real credit card offers protections that you don't have with an ATM card. If the merchant/service makes a mistake, you can dispute it with the CC company WITHOUT getting any OD/NSF. Not true if you use an ATM card-if the merchant makes a mistake, your money is gone until you can convince your bank to give it back, as well as OD/NSF fees.

5. ONLY ONE ATM CARD to one account. Do NOT have 2 or more atm cards for one bank account. Having 'his and hers' ATM cards attached to the same account is the same as in the old days when some folks would have 2 checkbooks for writing checks. It was an invitation to disaster then, and it is today.

6. Verify that deposits to the account have actually cleared. Deposits can take anywhere between 1 and 5 BUSINESS days to clear depending on the type and/or source of the deposit.

Follow ALL of these suggestions and you will NEVER pay an OD/NSF fee again unless it is a LEGITIMATE bank error, and then the bank will gladly and quickly rectify the situation and credit any fees generated as well as contact payees and cover any fees the payees assess to you.

This is a tried and true method to avoid these fees. It works EVERY TIME it's tried.
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#2 Consumer Suggestion

How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

The reality is that using an account register and reconciling that register with a monthly account statement from the bank will prevent any account holder from causing any NSF/OD fees.

The majority (if not all) of the reports I've read about NSF/OD fees have common behaviors of the account holders:

using atm cards for everyday purchases.
using more than ONE card attached to the account (husband and wife)
using atm cards for online purchases.
using atm cards for 'auto-bill pay' (autodebits)
relying upon telephone or online account balances to determine what money is available for that shopping trip to Walmart.
*NOT using an account register.
*not reconciling an account register with the scheduled monthly account statement generated by the bank.

Ways to avoid these NSF/OD fees:

1. Use an account register and reconcile the account register with a monthly written statement generated by the bank. If the bank is not mailing statements, contact customer service to have monthly statements MAILED to you.

1a. Be aware of ATM fees, such as the 'non-bank ATM fee' that most banks charge when you use an ATM that is not owned by your bank to make a withdrawal and post that fee in your account register immediately.

1b. Also be aware of any monthly 'account service fee' charged by your bank and post that to your register on the appropriate date.

2. Do NOT GIVE bank account information (or ATM card info) to any merchant, service provider, utility, online service to pay for services and goods. Use a REAL credit card for this purpose (either secured cc or unsecured cc.) Do not setup any automatic deposit to an account that is attached to said cc-NO auto payments to CC company-mail a check each month. If the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna have a host of problems and risk OD/NSF fees.

3. Do NOT use an ATM card for everyday expenses-USE CASH. Establish a monthly budget and withdrawal a weekly 'allowance' for every day expenses such as 'milk and bread' from the corner store, Burger King, etc. This will reduce the amount of transactions on the bank account which in turn makes RECONCILING the account and detecting ERRORS easier to accomplish. Again, if the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna risk NSF/OD fees.

4. Do not shop with the ATM card-use a real credit card. A real credit card offers protections that you don't have with an ATM card. If the merchant/service makes a mistake, you can dispute it with the CC company WITHOUT getting any OD/NSF. Not true if you use an ATM card-if the merchant makes a mistake, your money is gone until you can convince your bank to give it back, as well as OD/NSF fees.

5. ONLY ONE ATM CARD to one account. Do NOT have 2 or more atm cards for one bank account. Having 'his and hers' ATM cards attached to the same account is the same as in the old days when some folks would have 2 checkbooks for writing checks. It was an invitation to disaster then, and it is today.

6. Verify that deposits to the account have actually cleared. Deposits can take anywhere between 1 and 5 BUSINESS days to clear depending on the type and/or source of the deposit.

Follow ALL of these suggestions and you will NEVER pay an OD/NSF fee again unless it is a LEGITIMATE bank error, and then the bank will gladly and quickly rectify the situation and credit any fees generated as well as contact payees and cover any fees the payees assess to you.

This is a tried and true method to avoid these fees. It works EVERY TIME it's tried.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#3 Consumer Suggestion

How to avoid OD/NSF fees.

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

The reality is that using an account register and reconciling that register with a monthly account statement from the bank will prevent any account holder from causing any NSF/OD fees.

The majority (if not all) of the reports I've read about NSF/OD fees have common behaviors of the account holders:

using atm cards for everyday purchases.
using more than ONE card attached to the account (husband and wife)
using atm cards for online purchases.
using atm cards for 'auto-bill pay' (autodebits)
relying upon telephone or online account balances to determine what money is available for that shopping trip to Walmart.
*NOT using an account register.
*not reconciling an account register with the scheduled monthly account statement generated by the bank.

Ways to avoid these NSF/OD fees:

1. Use an account register and reconcile the account register with a monthly written statement generated by the bank. If the bank is not mailing statements, contact customer service to have monthly statements MAILED to you.

1a. Be aware of ATM fees, such as the 'non-bank ATM fee' that most banks charge when you use an ATM that is not owned by your bank to make a withdrawal and post that fee in your account register immediately.

1b. Also be aware of any monthly 'account service fee' charged by your bank and post that to your register on the appropriate date.

2. Do NOT GIVE bank account information (or ATM card info) to any merchant, service provider, utility, online service to pay for services and goods. Use a REAL credit card for this purpose (either secured cc or unsecured cc.) Do not setup any automatic deposit to an account that is attached to said cc-NO auto payments to CC company-mail a check each month. If the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna have a host of problems and risk OD/NSF fees.

3. Do NOT use an ATM card for everyday expenses-USE CASH. Establish a monthly budget and withdrawal a weekly 'allowance' for every day expenses such as 'milk and bread' from the corner store, Burger King, etc. This will reduce the amount of transactions on the bank account which in turn makes RECONCILING the account and detecting ERRORS easier to accomplish. Again, if the entity demanding payment makes a mistake, you're gonna risk NSF/OD fees.

4. Do not shop with the ATM card-use a real credit card. A real credit card offers protections that you don't have with an ATM card. If the merchant/service makes a mistake, you can dispute it with the CC company WITHOUT getting any OD/NSF. Not true if you use an ATM card-if the merchant makes a mistake, your money is gone until you can convince your bank to give it back, as well as OD/NSF fees.

5. ONLY ONE ATM CARD to one account. Do NOT have 2 or more atm cards for one bank account. Having 'his and hers' ATM cards attached to the same account is the same as in the old days when some folks would have 2 checkbooks for writing checks. It was an invitation to disaster then, and it is today.

6. Verify that deposits to the account have actually cleared. Deposits can take anywhere between 1 and 5 BUSINESS days to clear depending on the type and/or source of the deposit.

Follow ALL of these suggestions and you will NEVER pay an OD/NSF fee again unless it is a LEGITIMATE bank error, and then the bank will gladly and quickly rectify the situation and credit any fees generated as well as contact payees and cover any fees the payees assess to you.

This is a tried and true method to avoid these fees. It works EVERY TIME it's tried.
Respond to this report!
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#4 Consumer Comment

This IS your son's fault...

AUTHOR: Edgeman - (U.S.A.)

Not only that, but he will also be charged overdraft fees at Bank of America if he doesn't begin keeping a ledger or check register.

From the original post: "when I talked to somebody at the bank they told not to go by their on-line service, then why offer it!"

The bank is correct. Online banking is not intended to be used as a way to learn your account balance. What if your son fills up at the gas station and they only reserve a dollar when he actually spent $33? He would have thought that he had $32 more than he actually did.

To answer your question, online banking is for making fund transfers, viewing statements online, bill pay, opening new accounts/lines of credit and verifying transactions.

I think you will find that many banks charge a daily fee for negative account balances. You mentioned that your son has an account at Bank of America. Are you aware that on June 5th they will begin charging an extended overdrawn balance charge? Every time that they determine that an account has had a negative balance for five consecutive business days, they will charge a $35 fee.

I would take the time to teach your son about managing checking accounts. He can get a free printable check register here:

(((ROR redacted)))

Hope this helps.

CLICK here to see why Rip-off Report, as a matter of policy, deleted either a phone number, link or e-mail address from this Report.
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#5 Consumer Comment

Good Learning Experience...

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

"..It was not my son's fault, he checked his balance and he thought he was safe."
- NO, it WAS your son's fault. He failed to keep a register instead relying on on-line banking.

"..when I talked to somebody at the bank they told not to go by their on-line service, then why offer it! Was I ripped off.."
- On-Line banking was never meant to be the sole method of managing your account. It was meant as a way to verify and keep track in conjunction with your register. It can be inaccruate for many reasons beyond the banks control.

One example is if your son goes to a pay-at-the-pump gas station. The station authorizes $1 on the card, which is what will be posted on-line until the real charge comes through. So when they pump $30 it may take 2-3 days(especially over a weekend) for the station to submit the actual charge. If he relies on the on-line banking for that 2-3 days it shows he has $29 more dollars than he actually has. Not because of the bank, but because of the Station. But if he had his own register he would know that that $30 was spent, and not to spend it.

"..I thought 20 dollars for an overdraft was too much, I think 7 to 10 dollars would be fair, but all these people are talking about hundreds of dollars!..."
- Actually there is a way to pay $0 in fees. All together now class..."Keep a Register".

There are two types of people who overdraft. One set will look and see what they need to do to make sure it does not happen again, these people may overdraft once and never again, or very rarely. The others will look everywhere else but themselves as a place to put the blame. Unlike the first set, they will probably end up just repeating the same thing and end up with multiple overdrafts.

A vast majority of people DO NOT overdraft their account. While banks can make mistakes, almost without exception, if you trace back the cause of the overdraft it is a where the account holder made a mistake.

By the way why are YOU paying for these fees? He caused them, not you, not the bank. So he should pay for them. Believe me, if you make him pay for these fees instead of him thinking mommy and daddy will bail him out, he will learn very quickly about how to keep a register...Just Sayin'

Don't expect any bank to be much different. If he does not change his actions, it is just a matter of time before we see you posting another report about the next bank.
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