• Report: #191396

Complaint Review: 7-eleven

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  • Submitted: Sat, May 13, 2006
  • Updated: Sun, May 14, 2006

  • Reported By:lewisville Texas
7-eleven
193 E. Corporate Dr. Lewisville, Texas U.S.A.

7-eleven ripoff Lewisville Texas

*Consumer Suggestion: Your bank ripped you off.

*Consumer Suggestion: Your bank ripped you off.

*Consumer Suggestion: Your bank ripped you off.

*Consumer Suggestion: Your bank ripped you off.

*Consumer Suggestion: Not all oil companies practice this...

*Consumer Comment: Do not use card at the pump

*Consumer Comment: NEVER use your debit card at a gas pump that does not require a PIN number entry

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On 04/04/2006 I purchased $20.00 worth of gas from the 7-eleven on the corner of Hwy 121 and Corporate dr in Lewisville, Texas with my bank debit card at the pump. When I checked my balance on my account it said that I had a pending debit of $85.00 for that purchase which put me into overdrafts of over $200.00

I went to my bank and asked them about this debt and they gave me a print out that showed what had happened, so I took the print out to the 7-eleven and showed them to see if it could be cleared up and thankfully I had my reciept but they just took the information and told me they would report it to their corporate office which they did.

I later got a phone call from the senior suprevisor of their credit card department who proceeded to tell me that they where not at fault and that their was nothing they could do and that it was my banks fault because the $85.00 dollars was only surpose to be as a hold until the original amount was sent to the bank.

So I took that information to my bank who told me that it wasn't their fault that they have to deduct the amount sent to them even if it puts me into over drafts.

Needless to say I ended up paying my bank $199.78 in over draft fees that was not my fault.

if any one knows how I can get that money back it would me greatly appreciated.

someone owes me and I want them to pay.

Laura V.
Lewisville, Tx.

Laura
lewisville, Texas
U.S.A.

CLICK here to see why Rip-off Report, as a matter of policy, deleted either a phone number, link or e-mail address from this Report.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 05/13/2006 06:33 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/7-eleven/Lewisville-Texas-75067/7-eleven-ripoff-Lewisville-Texas-191396. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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REBUTTALS & REPLIES:
0Author 7Consumer 0Employee/Owner
Updates & Rebuttals

#1 Consumer Suggestion

Your bank ripped you off.

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

Ask your banker "When did you send $85.00 to 7-Eleven?" The answer is "never". The store asked the bank if your account was good for $85.00, and the bank said yes. That is the only signifigance of the $85.00 figure here. It is a standard practice at pay at the pumps because the pump can't know how much gas you will buy when it authorizes your card.

Crafty thinkers at banks trying to improve the bottom line have morphed this process into declaring that the authorized amount is real money. IT IS NOT. When they approved the authorization, the bank is now obligated to pay up to $85.00 if you pumped that much gas. That MAY cause an overdraft later. But in your case, only $20.00 of actual money was sent to the store to pay for the gas. The $85.00 was only a proposed amount, not a real draft.

How can your account become overdrawn if the money never left it? It can't. As long as the $20.00 purchase wasn't going to lead to an overdraw, you didn't overdraw. Demand all fees back from the bank.

Debit cards, especially in the non-PIN mode(*), enable huge rip-offs by banks. Don't use a debit card at all for shopping if you can avoid it. If you must buy gas with a debit card, always pay at the cashier.

(*) Using the PIN number everywhere while shopping is also a security risk. If someone gets your card number and PIN and uses it fraudulently, it is almost impossible to dispute.
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#2 Consumer Suggestion

Your bank ripped you off.

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

Ask your banker "When did you send $85.00 to 7-Eleven?" The answer is "never". The store asked the bank if your account was good for $85.00, and the bank said yes. That is the only signifigance of the $85.00 figure here. It is a standard practice at pay at the pumps because the pump can't know how much gas you will buy when it authorizes your card.

Crafty thinkers at banks trying to improve the bottom line have morphed this process into declaring that the authorized amount is real money. IT IS NOT. When they approved the authorization, the bank is now obligated to pay up to $85.00 if you pumped that much gas. That MAY cause an overdraft later. But in your case, only $20.00 of actual money was sent to the store to pay for the gas. The $85.00 was only a proposed amount, not a real draft.

How can your account become overdrawn if the money never left it? It can't. As long as the $20.00 purchase wasn't going to lead to an overdraw, you didn't overdraw. Demand all fees back from the bank.

Debit cards, especially in the non-PIN mode(*), enable huge rip-offs by banks. Don't use a debit card at all for shopping if you can avoid it. If you must buy gas with a debit card, always pay at the cashier.

(*) Using the PIN number everywhere while shopping is also a security risk. If someone gets your card number and PIN and uses it fraudulently, it is almost impossible to dispute.
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#3 Consumer Suggestion

Your bank ripped you off.

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

Ask your banker "When did you send $85.00 to 7-Eleven?" The answer is "never". The store asked the bank if your account was good for $85.00, and the bank said yes. That is the only signifigance of the $85.00 figure here. It is a standard practice at pay at the pumps because the pump can't know how much gas you will buy when it authorizes your card.

Crafty thinkers at banks trying to improve the bottom line have morphed this process into declaring that the authorized amount is real money. IT IS NOT. When they approved the authorization, the bank is now obligated to pay up to $85.00 if you pumped that much gas. That MAY cause an overdraft later. But in your case, only $20.00 of actual money was sent to the store to pay for the gas. The $85.00 was only a proposed amount, not a real draft.

How can your account become overdrawn if the money never left it? It can't. As long as the $20.00 purchase wasn't going to lead to an overdraw, you didn't overdraw. Demand all fees back from the bank.

Debit cards, especially in the non-PIN mode(*), enable huge rip-offs by banks. Don't use a debit card at all for shopping if you can avoid it. If you must buy gas with a debit card, always pay at the cashier.

(*) Using the PIN number everywhere while shopping is also a security risk. If someone gets your card number and PIN and uses it fraudulently, it is almost impossible to dispute.
Respond to this report!
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#4 Consumer Suggestion

Your bank ripped you off.

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

Ask your banker "When did you send $85.00 to 7-Eleven?" The answer is "never". The store asked the bank if your account was good for $85.00, and the bank said yes. That is the only signifigance of the $85.00 figure here. It is a standard practice at pay at the pumps because the pump can't know how much gas you will buy when it authorizes your card.

Crafty thinkers at banks trying to improve the bottom line have morphed this process into declaring that the authorized amount is real money. IT IS NOT. When they approved the authorization, the bank is now obligated to pay up to $85.00 if you pumped that much gas. That MAY cause an overdraft later. But in your case, only $20.00 of actual money was sent to the store to pay for the gas. The $85.00 was only a proposed amount, not a real draft.

How can your account become overdrawn if the money never left it? It can't. As long as the $20.00 purchase wasn't going to lead to an overdraw, you didn't overdraw. Demand all fees back from the bank.

Debit cards, especially in the non-PIN mode(*), enable huge rip-offs by banks. Don't use a debit card at all for shopping if you can avoid it. If you must buy gas with a debit card, always pay at the cashier.

(*) Using the PIN number everywhere while shopping is also a security risk. If someone gets your card number and PIN and uses it fraudulently, it is almost impossible to dispute.
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#5 Consumer Suggestion

Not all oil companies practice this...

AUTHOR: Ken - (U.S.A.)

At least here in the US, I frequently use my local BP station with a non-PIN dependent debit card, and I believe the most it ever authorizes for is a dollar or two. It's not nearly $75, or I would have noticed it. I honestly don't follow it that closely, but enough to know it's only a couple of dollars at the most.

This indeed could be different on the other side of the pond.
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#6 Consumer Comment

Do not use card at the pump

AUTHOR: Scott - (U.S.A.)

If you run low balances in your checking account or are close to your credit limit on your credit cards, do not use cards at the pump.

When you use the pump, your card is authorized before you start pumping. This authorization can be anywhere from $50 to $100 depending on the company. This authorization at the pump becomes an authorization hold on your checking account. This hold will stay in place until the company batches their credit card authorizations at the end of their business day, or however ofter they do this.

So if you run low balances on your checking account, go inside and have them run the card at the register. When you have the card read at the register, you are being charged the exact amount, because they don't have to guess what the amount will be.
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#7 Consumer Comment

NEVER use your debit card at a gas pump that does not require a PIN number entry

AUTHOR: Aafes - (U.S.A.)

Some information on these transactions:

"How your money gets frozen:

If you use your debit card at a pump that does not require a PIN, your bank regularly will block out an amount -- often $50 or $75 -- on your card.

That amount doesn't ?un-block? as you drive away. Instead, the hold remains up to 72 hours, until the station does a ?batch? transaction that lets the bank know the actual amount, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group.

While the length of the hold is up to your bank, the amount of the hold is up to your gasoline retailer.

Each big oil company has a different policy: Shell says it preauthorizes just $1 for gas purchases, for example. Chevron says it has a $1 hold that ensures a card is active. British Petroleum preauthorizes $75 when customers use debit or credit cards, said spokeswoman Sarah Howell. The same policy applies at its Amoco and Arco stations, Howell said. Hess asks for $75 as well.

The reasoning behind this policy is that oil companies don't know how much gas you're about to pump -- only PIN-based debit transactions are processed immediately -- and so they earmark a certain amount of your money.
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