• Report: #304

Complaint Review: Al Collins Graphic Design School

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  • Submitted: Mon, May 25, 1998
  • Updated: Tue, November 07, 2006

  • Reported By:
Al Collins Graphic Design School
1140 South Priest Tempe, Arizona U.S.A.

Al Collins Graphic Arts School- Tempe Arizona THEY ARE NOT WHAT THEY SAY THEY ARE!!! *UPDATE *Consumer Suggestion

*Consumer Comment: Everyone Hates Collins

*Consumer Comment: Former Student Sees Both Sides, but mostly enjoyed Collins College

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Collins is a good school

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Collins is a good school

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Collins is a good school

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Collins is a good school

*Consumer Comment: Collins College not worth the effort.

*Consumer Comment: Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

*Consumer Comment: Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

*Consumer Comment: Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: The Sad Truth...

*Consumer Comment: Just my opinion

*Consumer Comment: Good Experience

*Consumer Comment: I'd like to know why Collins College is accredited by some Trade School Accreditation and not by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design?

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: It's up to the Student

*Consumer Comment: TO MR X ins SCOTTSDALE - They have great instructors, great faculty and staff, and they are all willing to help you at the drop of a dime.

*Consumer Comment: A Former Student Rebutts False Accusations

*Consumer Suggestion: All that glitters is not education

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Eli Cruz couldn't pass a class at Collins College much less teach one.

*UPDATE Employee: You get what you put into it... Conde Nast, CBS, Phillip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Backer, Spielvogel and Bates

*Consumer Suggestion: Forgot to add

*Consumer Suggestion: Making it in the design world

*Consumer Suggestion: Making it in the design world

*Consumer Suggestion: Making it in the design world

*Consumer Suggestion: Making it in the design world

*Consumer Comment: Collins College To Blame

*0: I have to say that I do not agree with the above statement. I am a graduate of the Bachelors Program @ Al Collins

*0: there is a unwritten rule in a lot of firms in the valley that says DO NOT HIRE AL COLLINS STUDENTS.

*0: *Consumer Suggestion ..The fellow who called potential employers and asked about the school took the right approach.

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They don't do what they say they will. They don't have what they
say they have...................

*Hyped up representatives take advantage of prospective students with fast talking and false claims.
*Unexpected expenses.
*Frequent instructor turnover.
*Instructors reeking of alcohol.
*Many classes don't teach you all that they were supposed to cover.
*Broken down and obsolete equipment.
*Overcrowded computer labs.
*Their accreditation is shoddy at best.
*Apparent racism observed.
*Students left frustrated.

I unexpectedly found that the only school which honors an Al
Collins Associate of Arts Degree in Visual Communication is
California Arts College in California.

I found they didn't have equipment they had advertised on TV.
Also, Equipment constantly broke down and wasn't repaired on
time, which made assignments late and class projects went
uncompleted.

Upon completing a video concepts course, the instructor had been
fired and a group of students' portfolio pieces had been either
lost or stolen.

My typography class didn't teach what it was supposed to cover in depth and the instructor ended up being fired.

An instructor in me Macintosh production class came in every week reeking of alcohol.

More than 4 absences in an 8-week class drops a student from that class. I did observe that white students, who would be excessively absent, would still pass, but persons of minority backgrounds, especially Mexican, were being dropped... even excellent students and a women who had a baby!

I was told extra expenses for class materials were taken care of by a part of my tuition, but I would have to reach into my own pocket for over $1000 in extra expenses.
Such as :

Zip drive $200
Portfolio $53
Portfolio printing $300
Design Process $160 (photo shoot - costume rental)
Typography (photo shoot) $150
Photography (photo shoot) $167

Total $1,030


What happened here to me happened to many others!
Most of the students like me received Federal grant monies.
I know they should be envisaged.

A Former student

Cali D.
Tempe, Arizona

....UPDATE 8-19-00 ....

Theodore Sistrunk [SMTP:bullfiddle@earthlink.net]
To: info@ripoffreport.com
Cc:

Subject: Rebuttal to Report
Sent: 8/20/00 2:53 AM

This is not a rebuttal but an addition to the Al Collins graphic Design School.

I was considering attending. As a requirement of my financial aid, I called 5 places advertising for graphic artists & asked them, ..."If I was an Al Collins grad, would you consider hiring me?" ..They all said no!

Frizz Allen

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 05/25/1998 12:00 AM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Al-Collins-Graphic-Design-School/Tempe-Arizona-85281/Al-Collins-Graphic-Arts-School-Tempe-Arizona-THEY-ARE-NOT-WHAT-THEY-SAY-THEY-ARE-UPD-304. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report.

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#1 Consumer Comment

Everyone Hates Collins

AUTHOR: Jake - (U.S.A.)

Everyone hates collins for their own reasons. I wonder if some just started looking for bad things on it so that they would have a reason to not like the school. I attended Collins for a few months, but I had to leave because i didnt have the time for work and school. Which is why I now attend an online school (which may or may not bite me in the a** in the end). I found that some instructors were fun to have, and others seemed like they hated coming to work everyday.

Our class as a whole wasnt doing such a good job as far as grades go, and the instructors yelled at us like little kids LOL. But to be fair, i would guess around 90% of our graphic design program, had no idea what the program was really about, and some didnt even know how to use a computer. Hard to believe but very true. A bunch of my friends dropped out after a few classes, which is sad, but the people that had the best art in our classes were still there. I think that you get out of it what you put in, but at the same time, some people need more help than others, even if they dont know it.

Some instructors would neglect students that couldn't create big beautiful artwork, such as Eli Cruz. I have seen Eli tell someone they are stupid, dumb, and their design is the worst he has ever seen. All because he used different fonts in his very first magazine cover he had ever tried. This was unfair, and embarrasing to this person. After Eli told him this, he told me he didn't want to go back into the class, and he left the school after this. They have an excuse for their bad mannors. They say that they are providing job training, so we are being treated as if we were at work.

However, students are in fact students, and are here to learn, not to pretend they already know. Otherwise we wouldn't waste time and money on school, we'd just go out and apply for graphic design jobs right out of high school. Eli, bad mouthed this poor kid, in front of the whole photoshop class, and didnt care one bit, which i think is wrong in everyway. Eli has even told me himself, that he went to Collins to take a course in HTML, and they just gave him a job as an instructor. He is VERY VERY skilled in graphic design, but this doesnt mean that you are a good teacher of it. This type of situation, is most likely what these people are talking about when they say that they had unworthy experiences. Please to take this as me taking a shot at Eli, he was just part of my example what happened in MY class. Experiences may vary.
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#2 Consumer Comment

Former Student Sees Both Sides, but mostly enjoyed Collins College

AUTHOR: Julia - (U.S.A.)

I attended Collins College in the early 90s when Al Collins was actually on campus on a regular basis. He lectured in design classes and would buzz around on his electric scooter looking over students shoulders. He seemed very kind and genuinely interested in everyone's work. I was in the first class ever to use Quark Express and we marveled at the new color copier when it arrived. Having come from one of the top rated high schools in my home state of Oregon, I was surprised by the lack on academic ability of many of my peers. I knew fellow students who couldn't write one paragraph or give a verbal response to questions asked by the instructor. It seemed like a community college where anyone who paid the fees was accepted. I also noticed that it seemed like the students right out of high school were not qualified for college ? the academics or the lifestyle. If an instructor required students to arrive on time, half the class would fall apart and have a fit ? then spend the rest of the term getting in trouble for being late. Having worked at Nordstrom for two years prior to attending, I knew that being prompt was expected in the real world and thought it was reasonable that instructors would make that requirement. I also attended classes with kids (I say kids because I was in my early twenties when I attended) that would sit in the back and chat and crack jokes all through class, miss deadlines, and then complain when they didn't get the grades they wanted. My observation was that some artsy kids thought they could get by on their cool designs, without any work. Some of the other students didn't like me because I was "too serious", but the older students, staff and instructors appreciated my maturity and it paid off. I graduated in half the time (I was granted permission to double my course load) with a 4.2 GPA. Honestly, I do not think attending Collins has opened any doors for me due to the name, but very few schools offer that luxury. (If you can afford a big name school and have the grades, then by all means chose that school over Collins). If you are in search of an alternative, like I was, then use that school as a stepping stone to better things. My high GPA and rapid completion of the program showed employers that I was dedicated and hard working. Upon completion of my AA, I was almost immediately employed by a small out of state graphic design firm. I ended up leaving that position, but have always worked in marketing and advertising, so the degree and experience has been useful. Later, when I returned to school to finish my Bachelors, I found there were many students in their 30s, 40s and 50s who were complaining just like the old Al Collins days. They couldn't follow directions, couldn't finish assignments, and even the most basic academics were hard (writing a two page paper). I think some people expect something for nothing or very little effort. They expect college to be easy for everyone and frankly it is not. You have to be able to manage your life and school, which a lot of people cannot do. There are always people we would rather not deal with or unexpected fees. That's life. And all school bureaucracies are frustrating. Attending college is like going to the DMV for four years -- it's a pain, but you have to do if you want to reach your goals. The school is not intentionally hiring idiots or stealing money, they are like any other business - they have goals, but those do not always translate through the frontline employees. My best advice is find a great advisor and put your best foot forward every step of the way and at the end, use it as a stepping stone to reach your ultimate goals. If something goes wrong, don't lose sight of your goals and don't blame the entire college. And really, if it is so bad, then withdraw. You'll have to deal with the same stuff at the next school, but it's always an option.
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#3 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Collins is a good school

AUTHOR: Joe - (U.S.A.)

I graduated from Collins in 1993. At that time it was rated among the top 5 design schools in the U.S.. We had instuctors with impressive resumes and exceptional talent- Eric Perez, Richard Zizi, and Jack Elliot to name a few.

The student body looked like "It's a small world". People came from all over the globe to study there - we also had whiners.

Even at the heyday of the school, there were students who would cry about poor experiences and sub par instruction. Two such students were my roomates- both of them dropped out of the program.

I did not graduate with honors. However, I did have a great looking portfolio! Within weeks of graduation, I found gainful employement as a graphic artist in one of the largest print shops in my hometown. Did I get the first job I applied for? No. But I did land the first job I interviewed for.

I am now a senior designer for a daily newspaper in California. I love what I do for a living. In my tenure there, I have trained a few university grads on the job. They knew less about the programs and design priciples upon entering the workforce than I did with my A.A. from Collins.

Nobody graduates as a "Master" of thier field... The best that you can hope for upon graduation is a firm grasp on the principles and a fledgling skill set to get you in the door.

Sincerly,
Joe
Graphic Artist
Bakersfield, CA
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#4 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Collins is a good school

AUTHOR: Joe - (U.S.A.)

I graduated from Collins in 1993. At that time it was rated among the top 5 design schools in the U.S.. We had instuctors with impressive resumes and exceptional talent- Eric Perez, Richard Zizi, and Jack Elliot to name a few.

The student body looked like "It's a small world". People came from all over the globe to study there - we also had whiners.

Even at the heyday of the school, there were students who would cry about poor experiences and sub par instruction. Two such students were my roomates- both of them dropped out of the program.

I did not graduate with honors. However, I did have a great looking portfolio! Within weeks of graduation, I found gainful employement as a graphic artist in one of the largest print shops in my hometown. Did I get the first job I applied for? No. But I did land the first job I interviewed for.

I am now a senior designer for a daily newspaper in California. I love what I do for a living. In my tenure there, I have trained a few university grads on the job. They knew less about the programs and design priciples upon entering the workforce than I did with my A.A. from Collins.

Nobody graduates as a "Master" of thier field... The best that you can hope for upon graduation is a firm grasp on the principles and a fledgling skill set to get you in the door.

Sincerly,
Joe
Graphic Artist
Bakersfield, CA
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#5 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Collins is a good school

AUTHOR: Joe - (U.S.A.)

I graduated from Collins in 1993. At that time it was rated among the top 5 design schools in the U.S.. We had instuctors with impressive resumes and exceptional talent- Eric Perez, Richard Zizi, and Jack Elliot to name a few.

The student body looked like "It's a small world". People came from all over the globe to study there - we also had whiners.

Even at the heyday of the school, there were students who would cry about poor experiences and sub par instruction. Two such students were my roomates- both of them dropped out of the program.

I did not graduate with honors. However, I did have a great looking portfolio! Within weeks of graduation, I found gainful employement as a graphic artist in one of the largest print shops in my hometown. Did I get the first job I applied for? No. But I did land the first job I interviewed for.

I am now a senior designer for a daily newspaper in California. I love what I do for a living. In my tenure there, I have trained a few university grads on the job. They knew less about the programs and design priciples upon entering the workforce than I did with my A.A. from Collins.

Nobody graduates as a "Master" of thier field... The best that you can hope for upon graduation is a firm grasp on the principles and a fledgling skill set to get you in the door.

Sincerly,
Joe
Graphic Artist
Bakersfield, CA
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#6 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Collins is a good school

AUTHOR: Joe - (U.S.A.)

I graduated from Collins in 1993. At that time it was rated among the top 5 design schools in the U.S.. We had instuctors with impressive resumes and exceptional talent- Eric Perez, Richard Zizi, and Jack Elliot to name a few.

The student body looked like "It's a small world". People came from all over the globe to study there - we also had whiners.

Even at the heyday of the school, there were students who would cry about poor experiences and sub par instruction. Two such students were my roomates- both of them dropped out of the program.

I did not graduate with honors. However, I did have a great looking portfolio! Within weeks of graduation, I found gainful employement as a graphic artist in one of the largest print shops in my hometown. Did I get the first job I applied for? No. But I did land the first job I interviewed for.

I am now a senior designer for a daily newspaper in California. I love what I do for a living. In my tenure there, I have trained a few university grads on the job. They knew less about the programs and design priciples upon entering the workforce than I did with my A.A. from Collins.

Nobody graduates as a "Master" of thier field... The best that you can hope for upon graduation is a firm grasp on the principles and a fledgling skill set to get you in the door.

Sincerly,
Joe
Graphic Artist
Bakersfield, CA
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#7 Consumer Comment

Collins College not worth the effort.

AUTHOR: Tricia - (U.S.A.)

This is not a rebuttal, but an affirmation.

Perhaps it would be advantageous to know when some of these satisfied Collins alumni graduated. As a recent and former student of Collins College, I was extremely dissatisfied with the level of education I was receiving. While attending Collins College I maintained a 3.92 GPA and was placed on the National Dean's List, so this isn't a case of "you get what you put into it."

My time spent at Collins College feels, now, like a waste of MY time and MY money. Some of the instructors I had could not have taught a dog to sit, let alone 20 people how to layer in Photoshop. And, yes, all schools have these types of instructors. However, within two months of attending, the school not only changed their entire process and informed me that they would no longer be offering my degree program at that campus, but our time with these "highly qualified" instructors was cut in half. Now, instead of in class lab time, we were shuffled off to an over crowded lab room to attempt to create artistic masterpieces based on an hour of lecture. The school knew these changes were coming, yet I was NOT informed of it while signing up. Why? Because they were more interested in numbers, dollar signs, than providing me with a quality education. Many of the instructors were so dissatisfied with the changes that they left, leaving students with even fewer options of good instructors.

For those who still lament that "you get what you put into it", allow me to provide examples of how this was not true during my time with Collins. One of my classmates missed a minimum of one day every week, exceeding the "automatic failure" clause in the guide book. This classmate turned in projects that where thrown together at the last moment, and they looked it. Yet this classmate recieved only a single letter grad lower than I did. I had a classmate who continually did not listen, did not understand and did not produce required assignments who passed every class with a "C" letter grade. I had a classmate who continually swore and used racial, sexual and agist slurs (which is against most school policies) and was sent home repeatedly by the Dean of students who had the same grades as I did. Did his professionalism score even figure in?

How does this add up to a quality education? It doesn't. I didn't graduate from Collins, instead I transferred to The Art Institute and I've told people I know about my bad experience with Collins. Perhaps those who graduated prior to the fall 2005 semester did have good experiences, maybe they did "get what they put into it" and maybe they did secure good jobs with it. But I wouldn't trust my education to Collins now.

Tricia
Former and EX Collins Student
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#8 Consumer Comment

Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

AUTHOR: Wesley - (Switzerland)

Dear All,

I am a graduate of Al Collins and I agree with everyone that says, "You get out what you put in".

I have read through pretty much everyone's comments posted on this website and I agree and disagree with most of it.

In my 18 months at Al Collins I did notice a lot of messed up things like the Reps and Teachers disappearing but you have to make the most out it. I have attended other Schools that are a lot like Al Collins, it is not uncommon to have to deal with this you just have to accept it and make the most out of it.

Like any other School you have to work at it, you just can't expect to do your time and graduate and have employers banging down your door to hire you.

When I graduated from Al Collins, much like a lot of the people posted here, I stayed in Tempe and looked for a job. But in reality the supply out weighs the demand. That is why there is so many protesters outside the school. Do you think these people fly back all the time from where ever they live in the world to simply protest?

As soon as I left AZ it was no problem finding a job. Within a couple of weeks of moving back to the Midwest I had a job at magazine as a layout artist. After doing that for I while I applied for job in Switzerland at a top Sports Marketing Agency, dealing with European Soccer, and have been working there for the past 6 years. Currently I have been promoted from Head Designer to Brand Manager.

Also for the guy mud slinging Eli Cruz - you are so wrong. I had pleasure to have Eli teach me Photoshop and Quark and I haven't stop learning since. Thanks Eli!

So everything in a nutshell:

- Move out of AZ because there are too many Al Collins Grads hanging around there complaining making us look bad.

- Realize Al Collins gave you a base of knowledge to work with, you can't master something in 18 months it needs effort from your side. Design is something you constantly learn; you can never say you mastered it because it constantly changes. One of my Teachers at Al Collins told me that all design is is problem solving. But unlike Math or Physics which only have one correct answer design has many answer you just to pick the right one and sell it to your client.

Please keep all these things in mind and stop making the school I graduated from look bad to the rest of the world just because you had some bad luck.

Thanks for listening.
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#9 Consumer Comment

Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

AUTHOR: Wesley - (Switzerland)

Dear All,

I am a graduate of Al Collins and I agree with everyone that says, "You get out what you put in".

I have read through pretty much everyone's comments posted on this website and I agree and disagree with most of it.

In my 18 months at Al Collins I did notice a lot of messed up things like the Reps and Teachers disappearing but you have to make the most out it. I have attended other Schools that are a lot like Al Collins, it is not uncommon to have to deal with this you just have to accept it and make the most out of it.

Like any other School you have to work at it, you just can't expect to do your time and graduate and have employers banging down your door to hire you.

When I graduated from Al Collins, much like a lot of the people posted here, I stayed in Tempe and looked for a job. But in reality the supply out weighs the demand. That is why there is so many protesters outside the school. Do you think these people fly back all the time from where ever they live in the world to simply protest?

As soon as I left AZ it was no problem finding a job. Within a couple of weeks of moving back to the Midwest I had a job at magazine as a layout artist. After doing that for I while I applied for job in Switzerland at a top Sports Marketing Agency, dealing with European Soccer, and have been working there for the past 6 years. Currently I have been promoted from Head Designer to Brand Manager.

Also for the guy mud slinging Eli Cruz - you are so wrong. I had pleasure to have Eli teach me Photoshop and Quark and I haven't stop learning since. Thanks Eli!

So everything in a nutshell:

- Move out of AZ because there are too many Al Collins Grads hanging around there complaining making us look bad.

- Realize Al Collins gave you a base of knowledge to work with, you can't master something in 18 months it needs effort from your side. Design is something you constantly learn; you can never say you mastered it because it constantly changes. One of my Teachers at Al Collins told me that all design is is problem solving. But unlike Math or Physics which only have one correct answer design has many answer you just to pick the right one and sell it to your client.

Please keep all these things in mind and stop making the school I graduated from look bad to the rest of the world just because you had some bad luck.

Thanks for listening.
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#10 Consumer Comment

Giving Al Collins Graphic Design School a bad name.

AUTHOR: Wesley - (Switzerland)

Dear All,

I am a graduate of Al Collins and I agree with everyone that says, "You get out what you put in".

I have read through pretty much everyone's comments posted on this website and I agree and disagree with most of it.

In my 18 months at Al Collins I did notice a lot of messed up things like the Reps and Teachers disappearing but you have to make the most out it. I have attended other Schools that are a lot like Al Collins, it is not uncommon to have to deal with this you just have to accept it and make the most out of it.

Like any other School you have to work at it, you just can't expect to do your time and graduate and have employers banging down your door to hire you.

When I graduated from Al Collins, much like a lot of the people posted here, I stayed in Tempe and looked for a job. But in reality the supply out weighs the demand. That is why there is so many protesters outside the school. Do you think these people fly back all the time from where ever they live in the world to simply protest?

As soon as I left AZ it was no problem finding a job. Within a couple of weeks of moving back to the Midwest I had a job at magazine as a layout artist. After doing that for I while I applied for job in Switzerland at a top Sports Marketing Agency, dealing with European Soccer, and have been working there for the past 6 years. Currently I have been promoted from Head Designer to Brand Manager.

Also for the guy mud slinging Eli Cruz - you are so wrong. I had pleasure to have Eli teach me Photoshop and Quark and I haven't stop learning since. Thanks Eli!

So everything in a nutshell:

- Move out of AZ because there are too many Al Collins Grads hanging around there complaining making us look bad.

- Realize Al Collins gave you a base of knowledge to work with, you can't master something in 18 months it needs effort from your side. Design is something you constantly learn; you can never say you mastered it because it constantly changes. One of my Teachers at Al Collins told me that all design is is problem solving. But unlike Math or Physics which only have one correct answer design has many answer you just to pick the right one and sell it to your client.

Please keep all these things in mind and stop making the school I graduated from look bad to the rest of the world just because you had some bad luck.

Thanks for listening.
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#11 UPDATE EX-employee responds

The Sad Truth...

AUTHOR: Kevin - (U.S.A.)

The truth is that Collins is not in the same catagory as a USC or UCLA or any state university. They do have to stand up to the same standards but, you won't ever get a job from just going to Collins like you may by just going to Collins by the name alone. Maybe one day if alumni from Collins continue to be successful that day will happend some day.

The sad truth is, what you put into the program is what you'll get out of it. If you skip classes and don't pay attention in class, you will not succeed... plain and simple. Do what you are required, push your limits and discover what you are capable of. The harder you work at your career the absolute better.

Another truth is that not everyone can do this... Not everyone has the talent to succeed in graphic design, just like not everyone can hit a baseball or do quantum physics. Which is good for you... if you work hard and rise above everyone else. I am a proud graduate with my BS and now I've been in the field for almost 4 years and I'm making $70,000 a year. I was the hardest worker in all of my classes, you do the same.
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#12 Consumer Comment

Just my opinion

AUTHOR: Lucas - (U.S.A.)

I am not here to agree nor disagree.

But for anyone reading any of these reports remember that no place is perfect. There will always be someone somewhere that had an issue with a company.

Ask yourself this. You go to a department store for something and the sales people ignore you, then you ask for help and everyone is rude to you and you just wind up having a horrible experience. What do you? You never go back and you tell everyone you know about it because you're upset.

But say you go to a different store and you have a good experience, the staff is friendly and they have everything you want. Do you call all your friends and tell them? Probably not.
So you will probably always hear more bad things than good things about any company.

I went to a school in Chicago that is owned by Collins. I heard much the same thing about the school (The International Academy of Design and Technology) that I have heard about Collins. I did not graduate from the school just because I couldn't afford living in Chicago. But even not graduating yet, just having the school on my resume has opened a few doors for me. I have friends that have graduated from that school that have landed great jobs. So, I don't really see there being some conspiracy that all employers have not to hire graduates from Collins or other schools it owns.
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#13 Consumer Comment

Good Experience

AUTHOR: Krista - (U.S.A.)

Hello,

Would like to share that I had a most positive experience as a student and graduate of this school. The experience helped me shape and define key elements that are important to my life and future. I continue everyday to use the skills gained from this program and value the kind of people who shared their knowledge and practical skills with me.

As with anything worthwhile in life, working hard, staying focused and positive help us be successful regardless of what our circumstances are---rather than taking the route of blame and point fingers at others.

It is inspiring to see Al Collin's dream unfolding and so many folks having an opportunity to discover their creative potential.
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#14 Consumer Comment

I'd like to know why Collins College is accredited by some Trade School Accreditation and not by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design?

AUTHOR: Dale - (U.S.A.)

Any major art and design school is! Prospective employers look for that!

You wouldn't want to spend a whole bunch of
money attending a law school that isn't
accredited by the State Bar: you couldn't get
license to practice! Or if you were going to
study architecturet, or engineering you'd check
and make sure that your school is accredited!
But be your own judge, and do your own reseach
regarding Collins...
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#15 UPDATE EX-employee responds

It's up to the Student

AUTHOR: James - (U.S.A.)

In my experience, I have heard a vast amount of complaining regarding Collins College, but honestly, I think those who are complaining have spent too much time moping and pointing the finger at others, and not enough time working hard on bettering themselves as a designers, and in the words of Eli Cruz, "information specialists". I am a former student and employee of Collins and I can say with confidence that the school offers students every opportunity to become qualified designers and successful professionals.
As a Teachers assistant at Collins I had a first hand look at the qualifications and compitancy of many instructors. Honestly, some were better than others, but that descrepancy can be found at any school accros the nation.
Instead of analyizing the value of each teacher, I spent my time learning everything I could from any given instructor. After 5 hours of class, I would go on the clock as a teacher's aid for 5 more hours. After which I would go home, do my homework, and run out the rest of the day sucking up any additional software and design knowledge I could. I was honestly scared to leave school. I had heard how incredibly competitive the design industry had become and it's no joke. In preparation, I continually exhausted myself, striving to make positive that I was prepared to be on my own, and that my value would be readily apparant to a perspective employer. Simply meating the requirements of the class and getting an A isn't enough. This runs true no matter what school you're enrolled in.
If you are serious about design, please, your time can be better spent. Instead of blaming Collins for all your problems, take some time to learn more. Make yourself better. If you are truly talanted, and an employer sees your skills, it doesn't matter wherre you attended school.
In addition, please don't slandor Eli, I had the privillage to work with Eli on a daily basis for over a year, and I never saw him carry himself as anything but an experienced proffesional, a dedicated instructor, and a skilled designer.
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#16 Consumer Comment

TO MR X ins SCOTTSDALE - They have great instructors, great faculty and staff, and they are all willing to help you at the drop of a dime.

AUTHOR: Chris - (U.S.A.)

I am a current student at the new Collins West Side Campus. As a matter of fact, I was just nominated Student of the Month for November 2004 out of some 4,000 students. I think that it is a pitiful shame that someone would use their own lack of good sense and decision making as a poor, sorry ass excuse to file a Consumer Complaint. You know what Mr. X? It took me 4 years to get into that school. I had to overcome financial hardships, delinquent student loans, and agoraphobia in order to do it. I have been to San Jacinto University in Texas and A Jr. College out here before deciding to go to Collins and I have to say, Collins is exactly like any other college or school. They have great instructors, great faculty and staff, and they are all willing to help you at the drop of a dime. All you have to do is PARTICIPATE! When I read your post, the term Stupid is as Stupid Does came to mind. You can not blame your school for not getting a job. I am very certain that you would not make it in the armed forces per they expect for you to be Motivated.

Ok, I feel a Rant coming on now. I will address everyone who posted here and blamed OTHER people for their own misfortunes created by their own actions. That is the sadist most piss poor thing that a human being can do. I came from a broken home where my father was a Drill Instructor in the Marines and kicked my ass daily. My Mother was an Alcoholic. When the rest of my family realized that it was not suitable for me to live with either of them, I bounced around from Aunt to Uncle. I was the School Nerd but I still got girlfriends. I was the School Wimp, but then I joined Mu Duk Kwan and kicked someone's ass that picked a fight with me and no one bothered me again. I could not find work when I graduated school in Michigan so I moved to Texas where I began working in the Electrical Construction Field and made a ton of money! When I almost died during a Cyanide Leak, I moved to Arizona and found out that I could make tons of money telemarketing and started my own company. I grossed $850,000 for the first year I had it up. When my business went down the tubes, I did not blame anyone else but myself. My bad judgements, no one else's. When I got Anxiety and then Agoraphobia, I blamed no one. I went and got the help of a shrink and now I am better. When I could not get into the School of my Dreams, I did what I had to in order to get there!!

I interviewed for a job just this past Thursday afer School for Lead Designer for a large company and got offered $70,000 a year Salary. I Excepted! I guess I should blame my getting that job on someone else just like all the piss ant, whining people that posted negative comments on this site. NO! I got that job due to my professional appearance, enthusiasm, ability to communicate, portfolio, and my overall attitude that when I want something, I get it!

Stop blaming others for your mistakes. It will get you nowhere. Has this complaint gotten you anywhere. Be thankful that I shared 15 minutes of my valuable time handing out words of wisdom to you.

You post in a way that makes slugs and other invertebrates look like Nobel Prize winners. Dullard, do yourself and everyone else a favor: disconnect your computer from the Internet.

If your brain matter was axle grease, there wouldn't be enough in your head to grease the dynamo on a lightening bug's ass. Why is it that the people with the smallest minds always have the biggest mouths? You've got a big hole in your head, now shut it. When you are at a loss for words, your loss is our gain. It seems your fingers not only did your typing, but did your thinking too. Have you considered suing your brain for non-support? Does your train of thought have a caboose? If you knew what you're talking about, you'd be dangerous. Oh well, as the late Douglas Adams said: "You live and learn. At any rate, you live."

Try Not But Do You Must! Master Yoda
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#17 Consumer Comment

A Former Student Rebutts False Accusations

AUTHOR: Alexis - (U.S.A.)

I am a former student of Collins College and I would like to correct the fallacy that said "student" received a sub par education.

Previous to my education at Collins College, I attended Arizona State University and received no better an education than I received at Collins College. I had good grades but felt that my experiences were not worth the costs and chose instead to find my education elsewhere.

First things first:

I received my AA & my BA from Collins College with Honors.

I was easily able to attend another school in Arizona to receive my Master of Arts degree- also with honors. Not even a question about my attendance of Collins College.

I am a successful designer with my own company and a resume that reflects my education & experience.

I worked for a number of MAJOR arizona companies both as a freelance designer and full time desiger/photographer.

All companies knew I had attended Collins College, and whether they were sceptical or not, all gave me a chance based on my portfolio and interview.

Most people I had asked in business said that the main reason they had discounted Collins College graduates was that they had heard negative things about the school by students & teachers of other schools in the area (ASU, Acadamy of Art, UaT, Uop, etc...). NOT ONE of them had actually reviewed a portfolio or interviewed a former student of the school and based their opinions solely on WHAT OTHER PEOPLE SAID.

Never have I witnessed any sort of racism, sexism, or any ism of any kind. The school is totally multicultural and employs minorities and women as equally as they do white men (who by the way are now a minority in this country- of which group I am NOT a member).

Senior instructors at the school for the most part are top-notch. There is no significant difference between good instructors to bad instructors here vs. any other school. Period.

Senior instructors have impeccable pedigrees. Their experiences are invaluable to the education of their students, and unlike large universities, the instructors are on a first name basis and spend one-on-one time with ALL OF THEIR STUDENTS. Of course, if you are unwilling to put in the time or discipline, your efforts will be rewarded accordingly.

Any student at any school who believes naively that the cost of an education is limited only to tuition is an idiot at best and a liar at worst. No school is ever, EVER going to include the cost of your equipment, portfolio, printing, or any other resource. You are an imbicile if you even think for a minute that Collins College is above these rules and should comp you for the thousand dollars you spent.

Badmouthing an instructor like Eli Cruz shows no class, and an obvious cross to bear, because the man knows what he is talking about, has the portfolio to prove it (if you've ever taken the time to look at his work and accomplishments, you would know), and is obviously grasping for straws when coming up with excuses why they are incapable of getting a job. Eli Cruz neither paid me to post on his behalf, nor does he know about my post here, and as far as I know, has very little idea of who I am, considering I graduated from the school years ago.

Now then...

The school has it's flaws. Some of the instructors that have been hired leave a lot to be desired, and are usually quickly disposed of. The school is not perfect and doesn't have a sixth sense, and just because someone interviews well, doesn't mean they can teach. All schools make these kinds of mistakes, and as long as the students do their part by telling the administration their concerns, all will be remedied- eventually.

Yes, when I attended, some of the equipment was outdated, but eventually they spent the funds to update the computers. The network sucked for a while, but I've worked at major international companies and universities who would rival the suck factor of the networks. It eventually was upgraded as the school expanded it's degree programs, and last I heard, was at least decent.

I haven't attended a school that had a decent print department, so if you are smart, you only make the mistake of using the school's printing once. That being said, they don't have to supply it, they could easily force students to use Kinko's or Kwik Kopy, or Alphagraphics. I don't expect to get perfection from something they don't rightly have to provide. Besides, in a pinch, the print department works just fine.

The school store has more equipment and art supplies than ANY OTHER school store I have been to, and the discounts are considerable for some items.

It is true that you get out of something what you put into it. If you stand in the parking lot all goddamned day (or night) you will get nothing out of your education. If you learn and read and practice and talk to the instructors and ask their opinions or for their help, or just generally use your skills, you will get immeasurable benefits from your education at Collins College.

If you choose to shoot down and talk shit about any company, school or person, it is usually a good idea to at least spell correctly and use proper grammar. You look like an uneducated asshole who didn't get what you wanted with the minimal efforts you were willing to put into your education or job search. My guess is that you probably made your interviewer cringe at the simple utterance of your ignorant rambling, and that is the real reason you can't find a job more prestigious than flipping burgers at the local WhatABurger!

So, next time you feel the necessity of writing one of these Rip-off reports, you should seriously consider filling one out with your name in the 'company reported' field. Maybe if you spent as much time honing your skills as you did in writing this bogus report, you would find a job in a career field that suits you. I would suggest however, that education, design, or any field requiring a higher IQ should be immediately eliminated from your endeavors.
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#18 Consumer Suggestion

All that glitters is not education

AUTHOR: Exile - (U.S.A.)

Ok. What I tell others who choose these schools is this:
It all depends on the instructors and your effort.

If your instructors are not the pros that they presume to be, at least you have good facilities to work with.

It is no secret that many collins instructors once were students. not students that went to have big careers, but graduates who got a few months of reality and went back. curriculum I have read through are from text books and passed off as experience from the instructor.
that's ok, the books are all good. perhaps in time they have changed this, but it goes on all ofer america.

for many of these kinds of schools nationwide, the best that managements wants is 'yes' men and 'yes' women. graduate instructors are going to be easy to control and predict. you need to investigate this next time.

if you feel like there is less to your degree than you pay for, it still is up to you. even a trained dog can use an apple, but the same dog could save you from a fire one day. perhaps there is no one to blame but a reflection.

even if you feel bad about how it is for you now, stop the crying as it wont help you now.

if you feel collins is really how you see it, don't worry as the real pros in that city tend to avoid it anyway. time will catch up to it, but will pass you by as you fret so much.
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#19 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Eli Cruz couldn't pass a class at Collins College much less teach one.

AUTHOR: Mr.X - (Tonga)

Eli Cruz for all who know him is a door-to-door Hoover sales man, who couldn't spend a day working as a professional graphic designer. This guy is a case study for bull-shit. Someone should really look into his background because the very fact that he is teaching Graphic Design reeks of fraud.

And while your at it check the work histories on the rest of the instuctors as well .... that would be a good idea too.
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#20 UPDATE Employee

You get what you put into it... Conde Nast, CBS, Phillip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Backer, Spielvogel and Bates

AUTHOR: eli cruz - (U.S.A.)

i am a senior instructor at collins college...i have been there for seven years...i have a background as an art and/or creative director for Conde Nast, CBS, Phillip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Backer, Spielvogel and Bates, and countless other well-known companies around the world...my dedicated involvement in this field lasted for thirty years...i chose to work at collins because i believe, and my students verify this in my evaluations, that i can make a difference...i encourage the idea that i am not training you to be an artist, i am training you to be an information specialist...ironically, most students, not just in our school, can't be bothered with reading a newspaper or going online to see what is happening on our planet...not to mention, what is happening in the field they've chosen as a career...this ignorance can be deadly...because of open admissions standards, i get many students who have no skills or even an instinctive sense of design, students who think that a piece of paper they paid for will get them a job...that a student gets A's and graduates with honors, is really insignificant, that piece of paper means nothing if you can't back it up...to say that you didn't learn anything is delusional...education is based on reciprocity...if a student expects to be spoon-fed information, that student is making a terrible mistake...it's a two-way street...over the years as an instructor, my biggest disappointment is that the majority of students don't ask questions...if you're paying for an education and you don't ask questions, you're throwing your money away and will get little out of the experience...complaining about collins college is, in most cases, based on a student's inability to use good learning tactics...some students can't be bothered to read their books, use tutorials, or spend time at the learning center...some students don't even know what multitasking means...yes, collins college is expensive...students need to understand that they are investing money to make more money...i have hundreds of cards, letters, and e-mails from students, and even their parents, praising instructors and the school for helping their child find the right path...i am very proud of what i do...i am a professional, highly respected by students who want to succeed, and my peers...i am disliked by students that think that i should give them an 'a' just for showing up...i also accept that it can be difficult to find a job in our field...that goes for any business...to get work, you have to be informed...research the company you're applying to...adjust your portfolio so that it reflects the type of work a company does...yes, it's hard work, but if you do it right, you increase your chances of getting the job you want...it's not about the school you attend, or attended, it's all about maximizing your intelligence, design ability, and your desire to work hard...most of the good designers who graduate from collins will tell you that in spite of their innate design skills, it took a lot of work, and time, to get to a level where they could succeed in the business...collins college is challenging and centered on accelerated courses...it's not like asu, and other colleges, who don't really care if you show up to class...we care because we are in the business of preparing students to get a job...few colleges or universities share that attitude...i am proud of what i do and will continue to share my knowledge of the field and my experiences...complaining is immature...if you don't like the way we teach at collins college, go somewhere else...
respectfully,
senior instructor...
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#21 Consumer Suggestion

Forgot to add

AUTHOR: Elaine - ()

I forgot to add that you definitely want to make your creative resume kick a$$! Basically companies look at the overall DESIGN first, then they read the content. Remember, it's a design job, so they want to see something that's DESIGNED- how it's layed out, the typography, and the use of color and the type of paper. Make sure you have a complete stationery system that matches each other- cover letter, resume, business card, envelope, and (optional) promo piece.

The best jobs are found from companies that don't advertise on the web or in the newspaper. Send out your resume to a bunch of a companies, whether or not they are hiring. Sometimes when they see something in your resume/design skils that they like, they'll call you in to talk to you (even if they are not presently hiring). People I know have had this happened, and wound up being called back a few months later for a job when a position opened up.

Your resume is a ticket in to get an interview so they can see your (portfolio) book. Don't give up or get discouraged!
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#22 Consumer Suggestion

Making it in the design world

AUTHOR: Elaine - ()

I have never attended the Al Collins graphic design school, but I do want to respond to all the comments posted on here.

I hold a degree in Multimedia Design from Cal State University Northridge. I am currently completing a 2nd bachelor's degree in Graphic design, also at CSU Northridge.

The graphic design program at our school is excellent, but students from our school are always in the shadow of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Art Center C.O.D. is one of the top design schools in the world; unfortunately most people can't afford the 6-figure tuition from that school.

Unlike a state university, Art Center offers 4 years of art and design with no general ed (math, english, etc) for the degree. So for those four years, it's a full-load of just total design and art classes. They say that if you are a student there, they dont' want students to work while attending, you won't have much of a social life or personal life, it's hard to be in a relationship, and you better have financial aid to support your living costs as well as tuition (all because the teachers give you so much work that all your free time is spent on projects!).

The state universities have a great curriculum, but because of General Ed classes for the degree, a student usually gets only about 2 years worth of actualy design and art classes. Private colleges like Art Center offer 4 years of art and design classes. As a student and a job seeker, because I am always hearing about Art Center, I find that I have to try twice as hard to show that someone coming from a State school can be just as good as someone coming from an art school. Drive and motivation has everything to do with it. If you want to be good, and you work hard, you WILL be good. Just because someone comes from a prestigious art school, it doesn't mean they will be a good designer; just because someone comes from a lesser known school or a state college, it doesn't mean they're not capable of being an awesome designer.

My suggestions to you in the design career is:

-1) Become a human sponge. Listen to other designers and their suggestions about how they do things and the industry.

-2) Collect samples and be a "pack rat". If you go to gdusa.com, you can sign up to receive mailings and promos from paper companies, design firms, etc. Save the ones you like and why you think they are good in design. Even if you go shopping, and you see a package you think is interesting or catches your eye, save it. What is it in the design that appealed to you? What makes it original and interesting? Save things like mailers, logos, brochures, posters, packaging, etc. Save things that you think are GREAT design and BAD design. See what works and doesn't work, and LEARN from it.

-3) Subscribe to magazines like Communication Arts, Print, HOW design, and see what the new trends are in the industry. Some even have a student subscription that is significantly lower in price than the regular subscription. If you can't afford a subscription, buy one of the magazines maybe once every few months.

-4) BUILD A LIBRARY. I can't stress how important it is to have a library of design books. I have about 100 design books- logo books, typography books. packaging books, web design books, international design books, advertising, etc. I have been building my library for 2 years now, and I try to make it a rule to buy at least one design book a month. The books can be rather pricey at times, but sometimes if you go on Ebay, you can find used $70 design books for $10! I have found several of these on Ebay.

Basically to sum it all up, look at what is happening around the world and what people are doing in terms of design. As you notice the style professional people do in their designs, you will begin to realize what works and doesn't work, and begin to copy/combine these styles to develop your own.

Well I hope this helps you a bit. Just remember, your success in the world depends on YOU, not what school you go to.
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#23 Consumer Suggestion

Making it in the design world

AUTHOR: Elaine - ()

I have never attended the Al Collins graphic design school, but I do want to respond to all the comments posted on here.

I hold a degree in Multimedia Design from Cal State University Northridge. I am currently completing a 2nd bachelor's degree in Graphic design, also at CSU Northridge.

The graphic design program at our school is excellent, but students from our school are always in the shadow of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Art Center C.O.D. is one of the top design schools in the world; unfortunately most people can't afford the 6-figure tuition from that school.

Unlike a state university, Art Center offers 4 years of art and design with no general ed (math, english, etc) for the degree. So for those four years, it's a full-load of just total design and art classes. They say that if you are a student there, they dont' want students to work while attending, you won't have much of a social life or personal life, it's hard to be in a relationship, and you better have financial aid to support your living costs as well as tuition (all because the teachers give you so much work that all your free time is spent on projects!).

The state universities have a great curriculum, but because of General Ed classes for the degree, a student usually gets only about 2 years worth of actualy design and art classes. Private colleges like Art Center offer 4 years of art and design classes. As a student and a job seeker, because I am always hearing about Art Center, I find that I have to try twice as hard to show that someone coming from a State school can be just as good as someone coming from an art school. Drive and motivation has everything to do with it. If you want to be good, and you work hard, you WILL be good. Just because someone comes from a prestigious art school, it doesn't mean they will be a good designer; just because someone comes from a lesser known school or a state college, it doesn't mean they're not capable of being an awesome designer.

My suggestions to you in the design career is:

-1) Become a human sponge. Listen to other designers and their suggestions about how they do things and the industry.

-2) Collect samples and be a "pack rat". If you go to gdusa.com, you can sign up to receive mailings and promos from paper companies, design firms, etc. Save the ones you like and why you think they are good in design. Even if you go shopping, and you see a package you think is interesting or catches your eye, save it. What is it in the design that appealed to you? What makes it original and interesting? Save things like mailers, logos, brochures, posters, packaging, etc. Save things that you think are GREAT design and BAD design. See what works and doesn't work, and LEARN from it.

-3) Subscribe to magazines like Communication Arts, Print, HOW design, and see what the new trends are in the industry. Some even have a student subscription that is significantly lower in price than the regular subscription. If you can't afford a subscription, buy one of the magazines maybe once every few months.

-4) BUILD A LIBRARY. I can't stress how important it is to have a library of design books. I have about 100 design books- logo books, typography books. packaging books, web design books, international design books, advertising, etc. I have been building my library for 2 years now, and I try to make it a rule to buy at least one design book a month. The books can be rather pricey at times, but sometimes if you go on Ebay, you can find used $70 design books for $10! I have found several of these on Ebay.

Basically to sum it all up, look at what is happening around the world and what people are doing in terms of design. As you notice the style professional people do in their designs, you will begin to realize what works and doesn't work, and begin to copy/combine these styles to develop your own.

Well I hope this helps you a bit. Just remember, your success in the world depends on YOU, not what school you go to.
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#24 Consumer Suggestion

Making it in the design world

AUTHOR: Elaine - ()

I have never attended the Al Collins graphic design school, but I do want to respond to all the comments posted on here.

I hold a degree in Multimedia Design from Cal State University Northridge. I am currently completing a 2nd bachelor's degree in Graphic design, also at CSU Northridge.

The graphic design program at our school is excellent, but students from our school are always in the shadow of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Art Center C.O.D. is one of the top design schools in the world; unfortunately most people can't afford the 6-figure tuition from that school.

Unlike a state university, Art Center offers 4 years of art and design with no general ed (math, english, etc) for the degree. So for those four years, it's a full-load of just total design and art classes. They say that if you are a student there, they dont' want students to work while attending, you won't have much of a social life or personal life, it's hard to be in a relationship, and you better have financial aid to support your living costs as well as tuition (all because the teachers give you so much work that all your free time is spent on projects!).

The state universities have a great curriculum, but because of General Ed classes for the degree, a student usually gets only about 2 years worth of actualy design and art classes. Private colleges like Art Center offer 4 years of art and design classes. As a student and a job seeker, because I am always hearing about Art Center, I find that I have to try twice as hard to show that someone coming from a State school can be just as good as someone coming from an art school. Drive and motivation has everything to do with it. If you want to be good, and you work hard, you WILL be good. Just because someone comes from a prestigious art school, it doesn't mean they will be a good designer; just because someone comes from a lesser known school or a state college, it doesn't mean they're not capable of being an awesome designer.

My suggestions to you in the design career is:

-1) Become a human sponge. Listen to other designers and their suggestions about how they do things and the industry.

-2) Collect samples and be a "pack rat". If you go to gdusa.com, you can sign up to receive mailings and promos from paper companies, design firms, etc. Save the ones you like and why you think they are good in design. Even if you go shopping, and you see a package you think is interesting or catches your eye, save it. What is it in the design that appealed to you? What makes it original and interesting? Save things like mailers, logos, brochures, posters, packaging, etc. Save things that you think are GREAT design and BAD design. See what works and doesn't work, and LEARN from it.

-3) Subscribe to magazines like Communication Arts, Print, HOW design, and see what the new trends are in the industry. Some even have a student subscription that is significantly lower in price than the regular subscription. If you can't afford a subscription, buy one of the magazines maybe once every few months.

-4) BUILD A LIBRARY. I can't stress how important it is to have a library of design books. I have about 100 design books- logo books, typography books. packaging books, web design books, international design books, advertising, etc. I have been building my library for 2 years now, and I try to make it a rule to buy at least one design book a month. The books can be rather pricey at times, but sometimes if you go on Ebay, you can find used $70 design books for $10! I have found several of these on Ebay.

Basically to sum it all up, look at what is happening around the world and what people are doing in terms of design. As you notice the style professional people do in their designs, you will begin to realize what works and doesn't work, and begin to copy/combine these styles to develop your own.

Well I hope this helps you a bit. Just remember, your success in the world depends on YOU, not what school you go to.
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#25 Consumer Suggestion

Making it in the design world

AUTHOR: Elaine - ()

I have never attended the Al Collins graphic design school, but I do want to respond to all the comments posted on here.

I hold a degree in Multimedia Design from Cal State University Northridge. I am currently completing a 2nd bachelor's degree in Graphic design, also at CSU Northridge.

The graphic design program at our school is excellent, but students from our school are always in the shadow of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Art Center C.O.D. is one of the top design schools in the world; unfortunately most people can't afford the 6-figure tuition from that school.

Unlike a state university, Art Center offers 4 years of art and design with no general ed (math, english, etc) for the degree. So for those four years, it's a full-load of just total design and art classes. They say that if you are a student there, they dont' want students to work while attending, you won't have much of a social life or personal life, it's hard to be in a relationship, and you better have financial aid to support your living costs as well as tuition (all because the teachers give you so much work that all your free time is spent on projects!).

The state universities have a great curriculum, but because of General Ed classes for the degree, a student usually gets only about 2 years worth of actualy design and art classes. Private colleges like Art Center offer 4 years of art and design classes. As a student and a job seeker, because I am always hearing about Art Center, I find that I have to try twice as hard to show that someone coming from a State school can be just as good as someone coming from an art school. Drive and motivation has everything to do with it. If you want to be good, and you work hard, you WILL be good. Just because someone comes from a prestigious art school, it doesn't mean they will be a good designer; just because someone comes from a lesser known school or a state college, it doesn't mean they're not capable of being an awesome designer.

My suggestions to you in the design career is:

-1) Become a human sponge. Listen to other designers and their suggestions about how they do things and the industry.

-2) Collect samples and be a "pack rat". If you go to gdusa.com, you can sign up to receive mailings and promos from paper companies, design firms, etc. Save the ones you like and why you think they are good in design. Even if you go shopping, and you see a package you think is interesting or catches your eye, save it. What is it in the design that appealed to you? What makes it original and interesting? Save things like mailers, logos, brochures, posters, packaging, etc. Save things that you think are GREAT design and BAD design. See what works and doesn't work, and LEARN from it.

-3) Subscribe to magazines like Communication Arts, Print, HOW design, and see what the new trends are in the industry. Some even have a student subscription that is significantly lower in price than the regular subscription. If you can't afford a subscription, buy one of the magazines maybe once every few months.

-4) BUILD A LIBRARY. I can't stress how important it is to have a library of design books. I have about 100 design books- logo books, typography books. packaging books, web design books, international design books, advertising, etc. I have been building my library for 2 years now, and I try to make it a rule to buy at least one design book a month. The books can be rather pricey at times, but sometimes if you go on Ebay, you can find used $70 design books for $10! I have found several of these on Ebay.

Basically to sum it all up, look at what is happening around the world and what people are doing in terms of design. As you notice the style professional people do in their designs, you will begin to realize what works and doesn't work, and begin to copy/combine these styles to develop your own.

Well I hope this helps you a bit. Just remember, your success in the world depends on YOU, not what school you go to.
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#26 Consumer Comment

Collins College To Blame

AUTHOR: Jeanna - ()

I've heard it said that you get what you put into anything. I put a lot of hard work, precious time, and valuable money into my degree at Al Collins Graphic Design School. I graduated with honors, but the diploma opened no doors for me. I have proof of my great efferts and relentless determination. Graphic design programs have changed drastically and the fact that I do not have a job in the art field is due to NO fault of my own.

The Accrediting Commision of Career Schools and Colleges of Technology encouraged me to "contact the school directly for assistance". I continue to try to no avail. I urge anyone considering attending Collins College to look into it very carefully.
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#27 0

I have to say that I do not agree with the above statement. I am a graduate of the Bachelors Program @ Al Collins

AUTHOR: - ()

They filed the following rebuttal to the above Rip-Off Report:

Their email: cwhdesigns@hotmail.com
Their name: Corey William Harris

Their relationship to the company: Supporter

Rebuttal:
I have to say that I do not agree with the above statement. I am a graduate of the Bachelors Program @ Al Collins, now Collins College. I would say that the program was allot of hard work and that there were a few things that could have been improved upon as there are in all growing business as well as schools. You get what you put into anything and nothing is handed to you on a silver plater. If you do not have a job now it is your own fault. Being done with school is as hard as being there.
It takes you to go and get a job. I know for a fact that there are resources available for job search, pre & post grad. This does not mean that when you graduate there will be a job waiting for you. It is up to you. I am sorry that you feel that you were slighted but within 3 mos. of graduation I had a job that I am very happy with and still with. As for the fact that you were lied to. This is not true. When you pay your
tuition there is a supplies account set up for you to use for books, supplies, Zip drives etc. It is not allot of money but I was sufficient enough to get me through the each quarter. I don't think it even costs me $165 to do a photo shoot now.

I will not ramble on any further but I will forward this to the other job-holders in the Phoenix area that graduated from Al Collins so that you can hear it from them.
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#28 0

there is a unwritten rule in a lot of firms in the valley that says DO NOT HIRE AL COLLINS STUDENTS.

AUTHOR: - ()

This email is a rebuttal to RipOff #304.

It was sent by @Rebuttal_Name@ at designguy@hotmail.com.



Al Collins Graphic Arts School- THEY ARE NOT WHAT THEY SAY THEY ARE!!!*UPDATE *Consumer Suggestion (#304)

Tey filed the following rebuttal to the above Rip-Off Report:



Their email: designguy@hotmail.com

Their relationship to the company: Owner



Rebuttal:

I am a firm believer in it's as important what you DO with the education you recieve as it is the quality of eduction. I'm sure that even with poor courses or accredidation, if you have skills and drive - you will make it.



I will say though, that I do work in the Graphic design industry and there is a unwritten rule in a lot of firms in the valley that says DO NOT HIRE AL COLLINS STUDENTS.
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#29 0

*Consumer Suggestion ..The fellow who called potential employers and asked about the school took the right approach.

AUTHOR: - ()

This email is a rebuttal to RipOff #304.

It was sent by Larry Bullis at lbullis@dancris.com.



Al Collins Graphic Arts School- THEY ARE NOT WHAT THEY SAY THEY ARE!!! * UPDATE (#304)



They filed the following to the above Rip-Off Report:



Their email: lbullis@dancris.com

Their name: Larry Bullis

Their phone number: 602-478-9880

Their relationship to the company: Consumer Suggestion



Rebuttal:

I have no experience with Al Collins, but private trade schools require a lot of caution.



The federal government will loan students money to attend just about any sort of trade school and exercises almost no control over them. A student who borrows money to attend a completely worthless school is still required to repay the money.



Your best safeguard is to attend a school accredited by a recognized board, such as the American Bar Association (for legal skills). The problem with this is that many of the skills taught (such as auto repair) lack a generally recognized accrediting association.



Finding out who, if anyone, will hire a graduate straight out of a program is maybe the best approach. The fellow who called potential employers and asked about the school took the right approach.



This problem is not confined to private schools. I myself am a 1984 graduate of Mesa (AZ) Community College's Data Processing curiculum. I found that my degree was commercially worthless and that the college would do nothing to assist students in finding a job. I did finally find the kind of work I had trained to do, but about half my classmates never were able to enter the field. All of us -- job or no job -- were required to

repay our student loans.

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