• Report: #187162

Complaint Review: Bale Chevrolet , General Motors

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  • Submitted: Mon, April 17, 2006
  • Updated: Mon, May 01, 2006

  • Reported By:Alexander Arkansas
Bale Chevrolet , General Motors
13101 Chenal Parkway Little Rock, Arkansas U.S.A.

Bale Chevrolet, General Motors Sold us a new car with a defective healy-coiled engine ripoff Little Rock Arkansas

*Consumer Comment: That makes more sense

*REBUTTAL Individual responds: another mechanic says cast aluminum head defective

*Consumer Suggestion: Heli-Coils are new equipmrnt.

*Consumer Comment: Not a Heli-coil

*Consumer Comment: Not a Heli-coil

*Consumer Comment: Not a Heli-coil

*Consumer Comment: Need more info

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If you buy a new GM car from Bale Chevrolet be sure to check the engine for healy-coiling. This is were the GM factory overdrilled the spark-plug holes on the engine block and "rigged them" aka healy-coiled.

I was driving down the road, our Chevrolet Cavalier died. A spark plug had shot out of the engine. I tried to screw the plug back in and saw that it did not fit. I noticed that all the spark plugs had what appeared to be a brass ring around all of them. I called the dealership, they towed it in and told us we had a healy-coiled engine. We have never heard of this and did not understand what it was. Bale Chevrolet went so far as to accuse me of healy-coiling it!!

I called a master mechanic at another dealership to get an unbiased opinion and he explained to me that it is illegal in our state to sell a car with a healy-coiled engine as a new car.

I was told by one of the managers at Bale that this matter would be taken care of. Now I have a service lien for $345.48 for the repair of the spark plug being re-healy-coiled.

I have paid thousands of dollars for normal reapirs on this vehicle to Bale Chevrolet but do not feel I should have to pay for an engine defect that was deceptively sold to me.

Brian
Alexander, Arkansas
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 04/17/2006 08:31 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Bale-Chevrolet-General-Motors/Little-Rock-Arkansas-72211/Bale-Chevrolet-General-Motors-Sold-us-a-new-car-with-a-defective-healy-coiled-engine-ripo-187162. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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REBUTTALS & REPLIES:
0Author 6Consumer 1Employee/Owner
Updates & Rebuttals

#1 Consumer Comment

That makes more sense

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

More than likely, some genius decided to use an air-wrench to install the plugs. When he did this amazingly bad trick, he probably stripped the threads. With next to nothing holding the plug in, it came out under pressure.

Rethreading the head and heli-coiling it would have sufficed. Chevrolet doesn't heli-coil the spark plug holes at the factory. There are sveral aftermarket designs that work fine. NONE of them require much effort. Also, NONE of them require removal of the head to repair.

The Saturns had issues with the heads being bad, but so far, I have not heard of any issues with the Chevys. Ask your local dealership to look up any TSBs for you concerning this matter.

Good luck.
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#2 REBUTTAL Individual responds

another mechanic says cast aluminum head defective

AUTHOR: Juliann - (U.S.A.)

OK, I took this to a trusted mechanic that says this is the way this engine was designed from the factory because GM denied this was a "Heli-coiled engine". Thanks for the correction because only master mechanics know what a heli-coil is(not the average consumer) It is a heli-coiled engine with a cast aluminum head. GM has to heli-coil this engine to even get the spark plugs in this design. Why not stick by the truth of this engine design?

My trusted mechanic says the cast aluminum head looks defective because you can see flakes of aluminum (kind of like styrafoam).

In his opinion, the head caused the spark plug to shoot out.

I don't think the average consumer knows what heli-coiled is and I think this provides some important information. The pros and cons of an engine head and block,and spark plug assembly, something I will look at fully when ever purchasing again.

If you have a Chevy Cavalier with the same problem, report it to your State's Attorney General because this is how recalls get started, and companies can improve engine design.
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#3 Consumer Suggestion

Heli-Coils are new equipmrnt.

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

I'm a Master Mechanic, I have no connection with anyone, or any dealer here.

The cylinder heads on most engines are aluminum, Heli-coils inserts are stainless steel, much stronger. Some cylinder heads come factory new with inserts to strengthen the spark plug holes, some are helicoiled in fvery boly hole there is on the engine, it's all for added strength.

In fact all new Continental Aircraft engines are Heli-Coiled brand new from the factory, and aircraft engines have to meet standards much higher than any automotive engine.

You have NOT been given any used or repaired engine, you are wrong, simply send the car back to the dealership for repair, they will either reinstall a new heli-coil insert, or replace the head with a new also helicoiled cylinder head.
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#4 Consumer Comment

Not a Heli-coil

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

You said the "healy-coil" was brass. Heli-coils are made from stainless steel. As was mentioned, they are stronger than the original threads. This is because they are generally used to repair a stripped hole in aluminum.

I've never had one let go. They just don't. You use a special oversize tap and cut new threads. Put loktite on the insert and screw it in. After about 5 minutes, the new threads are ready for whatever you want to screw into them.

If you had a spark plug shoot out, someone rigged it up to begin with. ALL threaded holes in high performance parts are heli-coiled. This makes them as strong as their iron counterparts.

I don't know what you had done, but Heli-coils aren't to blame.
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#5 Consumer Comment

Not a Heli-coil

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

You said the "healy-coil" was brass. Heli-coils are made from stainless steel. As was mentioned, they are stronger than the original threads. This is because they are generally used to repair a stripped hole in aluminum.

I've never had one let go. They just don't. You use a special oversize tap and cut new threads. Put loktite on the insert and screw it in. After about 5 minutes, the new threads are ready for whatever you want to screw into them.

If you had a spark plug shoot out, someone rigged it up to begin with. ALL threaded holes in high performance parts are heli-coiled. This makes them as strong as their iron counterparts.

I don't know what you had done, but Heli-coils aren't to blame.
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#6 Consumer Comment

Not a Heli-coil

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

You said the "healy-coil" was brass. Heli-coils are made from stainless steel. As was mentioned, they are stronger than the original threads. This is because they are generally used to repair a stripped hole in aluminum.

I've never had one let go. They just don't. You use a special oversize tap and cut new threads. Put loktite on the insert and screw it in. After about 5 minutes, the new threads are ready for whatever you want to screw into them.

If you had a spark plug shoot out, someone rigged it up to begin with. ALL threaded holes in high performance parts are heli-coiled. This makes them as strong as their iron counterparts.

I don't know what you had done, but Heli-coils aren't to blame.
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#7 Consumer Comment

Need more info

AUTHOR: Joshua - (U.S.A.)

If you have spent thousands of dollars on repairs or maintenance this is not a "new" Cavalier. It is HELI coiled not HEALY coiled. If you do any kind of research on helicoils you will find that this is stronger than just tapping the raw metal for threads and putting in the plug or bolt. It is not a "rigging" device. Several engine builders will helicoil all threaded connections in the engine or transmission. Spark plugs dont just blow out without some help. It sound like you have an older car that has a problem that you think someone else should pay for. How many miles are on this car? Have the plugs been changed before? Have you checked to see if this is a common or recurring problem for GM in any of their engines? Try to get all of the facts together before you start bashing a company as a ripoff.
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