• Report: #260758

Complaint Review: CONTINENTAL AIRLINES

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  • Submitted: Fri, July 13, 2007
  • Updated: Thu, March 27, 2008

  • Reported By:Nashville Tennessee
CONTINENTAL AIRLINES
www.continental airlines.net Atlanta, Georgia U.S.A.

CONTINENTAL AIRLINES Mother & child thrown off plane because the child was talking Atlanta Georgia

*Consumer Comment: Oh come on already!!!

*Consumer Comment: Safety Briefing

*Consumer Comment: Good for Continental!

*Consumer Comment: Jim, Suggesting/ordered...

*Consumer Comment: Jodi - Not The Point.....

*Consumer Comment: Jodi - Not The Point.....

*Consumer Comment: Jodi - Not The Point.....

*Consumer Comment: Jodi - Not The Point.....

*Consumer Comment: Jim..?

*Consumer Comment: Mike? She Never Said That

*Consumer Comment: Tallulah-Phoebe

*Consumer Comment: Just a quick message to the rebuttal

*Consumer Comment: Unlike you, I was actually on that flight

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I just read today 7/13/2007 that a child with its mother were thrown off a flight from Atlanta,GA to Oklahoma. The stewardess told the lady to "medicate your child" to shut the child up. The child was saying "bye,bye plane". I think that Continental Airlines should publically apologise to the lady and to the general public for such an act. The stewardess had the pilot to return to the airport in Atlanta,GA. & have the lady & her child physically removed from the plane. The woman was left w/o her luggage, she didn't have any clean diapers, food for the baby or any means to care for the child. This act by a corporation today is utterly atrocious. The stewardess should be fired for treating the lady & her child as she did. If anything, other airline personnel on the plane should have aided the lady if there was a problem. She should be given a million dollars by the airlines for being treated like this. I personally will never fly Continental Airlines again. If they are the only plane going to my destination, I just won't go. They will never get a penny of my money directly. I believe the FAA should have a thorough investigation into this incident. If this had been a drunk or disrupted adult then I would be on the side of the airlines, but a baby saying "bye, bye plane" Come on !!! Don't fly Continental Airlines until they straighten up their act. This is a 1 year old child. This stewardess needs to take a Xanax & have a long time off.

Jimizs
Nashville, Tennessee
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 07/13/2007 06:58 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/CONTINENTAL-AIRLINES/Atlanta-Georgia/CONTINENTAL-AIRLINES-Mother-child-thrown-off-plane-because-the-child-was-talking-Atlanta-260758. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Consumer Comment

Oh come on already!!!

AUTHOR: Jennifer - (U.S.A.)

I have flown Continental airlines and have dealt with unrully or difficult passengers, However most of them were ADULTS!! Most adults behave worse then this 18month old child. I can deal with a child because of the fact it is a Child and does not have higher reasoning skills. Stupid drunk adults they are a completly different story. I find it incredible that reasonable adults can't be more understanding. My older sister is mentally retarded and acts like this little one in public. We have been stared at, asked to leave places. and actually walked out when it was the wisest thing (because we know my sister not because we were ordered to). Now when we are asked to leave we tell them no we are eating our dinner or shopping ect and those few that have that big a problem can come to us themselves, deal with it, or leave themselves. Why didn't the airline ask those who were so annoyed if they wanted off and comp them. Sometimes we all have to deal with not so great situations...so the next time you are flying buy some earplugs and pray for a speady trip. Also have some tolerence for small children after all they are CHILDREN!!!
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#2 Consumer Comment

Safety Briefing

AUTHOR: Karl - (U.S.A.)

Unfortunately Dave in Jacksonville, the safety briefing is worthwhile. I agree about buckling a seatbelt and using the seat as a flotation device but many many aircraft accidents which would be survivable result in deaths because passengers fail to identify the closest emergency exit. When an aircraft lands with damage or rupture to the fuselage or lifts off then crashes just past the runway there is a window of at most a minute or two -sometimes less - before leaking fuel ignites.

Passengers need to know how - as United used to say in their Safety Cards - "to get out of this aircraft fast". If they wait calmly in the aisle for the forward door to open they die of asphxiation or burn to death. This has happened in a number of aircraft mishaps. Obviously if you ignore the safety briefing you have an excellent chance of living to a ripe old age without ever experiencing an aircraft accident, but when an accident does occur and you don't know the way out of the plane you will probably die in short order. Ignore the briefing if you'd like but read the safety card and actually turn your head if necessary to find the nearest exit. If you sit in an exit row to gain more legroom learn how to open the exit panel by reading the safety card. A couple hundred people may thank you later.
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#3 Consumer Comment

Good for Continental!

AUTHOR: Maryooch - (U.S.A.)

Having travelled over 100,000 miles on business for the past few years, I can say from experience that the flight crews are pretty tolerant when it comes to passengers' bad behavior. In fact, there have been many times that the other passengers are made to suffer the tirades of unruly children while their parents feign oblivion. I've had to ask many a parent to stop their child from kicking my chairback, pounding on the tray table, or being generally disruptive in an unchecked manner. I could write a book! Long flights are hard enough, and every passenger, regardless of age, should employ basic etiquette and consideration towards their fellow passengers. Children shouldn't be flying until they learn how to conduct themselves properly. I'm sure the flight crew did everything possible to diffuse the situation, and turned the flight back as a last resort.

As for the mother being stranded without diapers or food, give me a break! If you board an aircraft without the basic necessities needed for your child, you have only yourself to blame. The airline is not responsible to feed, comfort, or entertain your child. When you can afford to fly in a private plane, THEN you can let your kid scream, cry, run around, kick, throw food, or whatever else their little hearts desire. Until then, it is extremely unfair and inconsiderate to subject other paying passengers to that behavior.

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#4 Consumer Comment

Jim, Suggesting/ordered...

AUTHOR: Jodi - (U.S.A.)

is not the point I was making. The fact that she even brought up medication was my point. The 'ordering' Benadryl as opposed to 'suggesting' Benadryl makes no difference, to me. I feel it was wrong. I agree, the child should have been removed. I feel Continental did the right thing. The flight attendant did the wrong thing by suggesting or ordering it. What makes you think I doubt Benadryl was in the media? I agree with you on the deplorable state of the media. If I hear one more thing about Paris Hilton or Lindsey Lohan (when there is a war going on) I'll puke! Thanks for responding Jim, I do understand your point.
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#5 Consumer Comment

Jodi - Not The Point.....

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

My comment to Mike was twofold:

1. The inference that somehow the first commentator advocated the position of the stewardess. No expressed point was made, though there seemed to be an inferred point.

2. The fact that the stewardess "suggested" the mother administer Benadryl, as opposed to giving a directive (or order) to give the child Benadryl. There is a difference and that needed to be clarified.


The short answer to your question is that Benadryl is a medication, however that isn't anywhere near the point. Nor would I have administered my child Benadryl in an effort to calm my daughter down when she was that age (this child was 19 months), but that isn't the point either. The point is that the stewardess can recommend the mother do anything in order to get the child to calm down, and if the child does not calm down, the flight crew has many options up to and including the return of the flight to its origin city and removal of passengers. The problem with the entire reporting of the story in the media (and the OP idiotic recounting) is that somehow not medicating a child = returning the flight. The commentator who was there did not suggest that was the case.

If the mother would not medicate the child, then she needed to do something else. She didn't. Traveling with a child is not easy - you bring toys, books, and anything else that will entertain a child. Doing nothing to control her child and then bitching about getting kicked off with no supplies or anything is sad, but in this case - necessary.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/12/national/main3051464.shtml?source=RSSattr=U.S._3051464

Jodi, you seemed to doubt that Benadryl was not in the media stories - here is the link to the story citing specifically the term "Baby Benadryl" as the recommended drug to administer the child. We had members of the family over our house and this story came up - and the use of Benadryl specifically. If it had not been in the media - there would have been no other way members of my family would have known about it. The article is also a wonderful example of the sad state of media in this country......
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#6 Consumer Comment

Jodi - Not The Point.....

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

My comment to Mike was twofold:

1. The inference that somehow the first commentator advocated the position of the stewardess. No expressed point was made, though there seemed to be an inferred point.

2. The fact that the stewardess "suggested" the mother administer Benadryl, as opposed to giving a directive (or order) to give the child Benadryl. There is a difference and that needed to be clarified.


The short answer to your question is that Benadryl is a medication, however that isn't anywhere near the point. Nor would I have administered my child Benadryl in an effort to calm my daughter down when she was that age (this child was 19 months), but that isn't the point either. The point is that the stewardess can recommend the mother do anything in order to get the child to calm down, and if the child does not calm down, the flight crew has many options up to and including the return of the flight to its origin city and removal of passengers. The problem with the entire reporting of the story in the media (and the OP idiotic recounting) is that somehow not medicating a child = returning the flight. The commentator who was there did not suggest that was the case.

If the mother would not medicate the child, then she needed to do something else. She didn't. Traveling with a child is not easy - you bring toys, books, and anything else that will entertain a child. Doing nothing to control her child and then bitching about getting kicked off with no supplies or anything is sad, but in this case - necessary.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/12/national/main3051464.shtml?source=RSSattr=U.S._3051464

Jodi, you seemed to doubt that Benadryl was not in the media stories - here is the link to the story citing specifically the term "Baby Benadryl" as the recommended drug to administer the child. We had members of the family over our house and this story came up - and the use of Benadryl specifically. If it had not been in the media - there would have been no other way members of my family would have known about it. The article is also a wonderful example of the sad state of media in this country......
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#7 Consumer Comment

Jodi - Not The Point.....

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

My comment to Mike was twofold:

1. The inference that somehow the first commentator advocated the position of the stewardess. No expressed point was made, though there seemed to be an inferred point.

2. The fact that the stewardess "suggested" the mother administer Benadryl, as opposed to giving a directive (or order) to give the child Benadryl. There is a difference and that needed to be clarified.


The short answer to your question is that Benadryl is a medication, however that isn't anywhere near the point. Nor would I have administered my child Benadryl in an effort to calm my daughter down when she was that age (this child was 19 months), but that isn't the point either. The point is that the stewardess can recommend the mother do anything in order to get the child to calm down, and if the child does not calm down, the flight crew has many options up to and including the return of the flight to its origin city and removal of passengers. The problem with the entire reporting of the story in the media (and the OP idiotic recounting) is that somehow not medicating a child = returning the flight. The commentator who was there did not suggest that was the case.

If the mother would not medicate the child, then she needed to do something else. She didn't. Traveling with a child is not easy - you bring toys, books, and anything else that will entertain a child. Doing nothing to control her child and then bitching about getting kicked off with no supplies or anything is sad, but in this case - necessary.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/12/national/main3051464.shtml?source=RSSattr=U.S._3051464

Jodi, you seemed to doubt that Benadryl was not in the media stories - here is the link to the story citing specifically the term "Baby Benadryl" as the recommended drug to administer the child. We had members of the family over our house and this story came up - and the use of Benadryl specifically. If it had not been in the media - there would have been no other way members of my family would have known about it. The article is also a wonderful example of the sad state of media in this country......
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#8 Consumer Comment

Jodi - Not The Point.....

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

My comment to Mike was twofold:

1. The inference that somehow the first commentator advocated the position of the stewardess. No expressed point was made, though there seemed to be an inferred point.

2. The fact that the stewardess "suggested" the mother administer Benadryl, as opposed to giving a directive (or order) to give the child Benadryl. There is a difference and that needed to be clarified.


The short answer to your question is that Benadryl is a medication, however that isn't anywhere near the point. Nor would I have administered my child Benadryl in an effort to calm my daughter down when she was that age (this child was 19 months), but that isn't the point either. The point is that the stewardess can recommend the mother do anything in order to get the child to calm down, and if the child does not calm down, the flight crew has many options up to and including the return of the flight to its origin city and removal of passengers. The problem with the entire reporting of the story in the media (and the OP idiotic recounting) is that somehow not medicating a child = returning the flight. The commentator who was there did not suggest that was the case.

If the mother would not medicate the child, then she needed to do something else. She didn't. Traveling with a child is not easy - you bring toys, books, and anything else that will entertain a child. Doing nothing to control her child and then bitching about getting kicked off with no supplies or anything is sad, but in this case - necessary.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/12/national/main3051464.shtml?source=RSSattr=U.S._3051464

Jodi, you seemed to doubt that Benadryl was not in the media stories - here is the link to the story citing specifically the term "Baby Benadryl" as the recommended drug to administer the child. We had members of the family over our house and this story came up - and the use of Benadryl specifically. If it had not been in the media - there would have been no other way members of my family would have known about it. The article is also a wonderful example of the sad state of media in this country......
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#9 Consumer Comment

Jim..?

AUTHOR: Jodi - (U.S.A.)

If the flight attendant suggested Benadryl , isn't that suggesting the child be medicated? Isn't Benadryl a medication? I don't think the attendant was suggesting it because the child had allergies. No, she WAS suggesting Benadryl because it would make the child sleepy. Also, the Benadryl comment was not taken from media reports. It came from some Tallulah/Phoebe person, who claims to have been on the flight. It's the first rebuttal.
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#10 Consumer Comment

Mike? She Never Said That

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

Mike - you need to re-read. This commentator you criticize never suggested medicating children is what should be done to children who are out of control. This person reported what the stewardess stated as a suggestion.

She was not advocating that position in her commentary. In fact, the commentator's statement was taken from the media reports on the story - which would indicate it was the stewardess who stated it, not the commentator. Whether you believe the commentator advocated the position of the stewardess is up to you - but it certainly cannot be explicitly ascertained from the commentary provided (though there may be an inference?).

The difference between the two statements you cite, the first from the idiot OP who wrote, "medicate your child" and the statement uttered by the stewardess, and again repeated in the media, as suggesting the child be given Benadryl is:

The former is a directive and is required to be followed
The latter is a suggestion and is NOT required to be followed

IMHO, I don't know what to do about the situation except to do exactly as the airline did - which is the original point of the ROR. I applaud the airline to do what the mother could not, and therefore rebut completely the OP. If the OP has ever been on a plane for something other than a vacation, then we all know what the commentator was talking about.

If the mother chose not to exact control over her child, that's a problem and there can be a consequence to that lack of action. The mother should have acted far sooner to control the child - otherwise the stewardess would not have needed to even approach and deal with the situation. Are we not going to hold the mother accountable?

In the end, this is a non-story without the activity of the stewardess, whose actions have been subject to question. The stewardess should be provided additional training, and the airline be given a gold star.
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#11 Consumer Comment

Tallulah-Phoebe

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

While I agree that if the child was causing that much of a commotion the child should have been removed, I find this statement of yours utterly beyond belief:

"Additionally, the flight attendant never ordered the mother, ''medicate your child' as you quoted. Since the mother obviously could not or would not control her own child, the flight attendant suggested that she give him some children's Benadryl, as this is what other parents with out of control children often do. This was merely a suggestion."

**Please explain the difference to me between not saying "medicate your child" and "suggesting she give him Benadryl"....

As for your belief that out of control kids should be doped up, I find this utterly reprehensible thinking. maybe you folks out there in Beverly Hills think it's ok to dope your kids when you can't control them, but that's HORRIBLE and could lead to many drugg addicts being created. Upset? Take some drugs to calm down!
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#12 Consumer Comment

Just a quick message to the rebuttal

AUTHOR: Dave - (U.S.A.)

Although I agree with you 100% regarding unmanageable children on an airplane, I will have to disagree with you about interrupting the "important safety information". Nobody listens or cares about that. And quite frankly, if you believe that your seat cushion can be used as a floatation device after you've crashed into the ocean from 30000 feet, you don't belong on a plane. Also, if you need visual instruction on how to fasten a seat belt, you don't belong on this planet.

I agree with the airlines though. Screaming toddlers have no business using public transportation of any kind. Don't get me wrong, I have raised 3 kids, but they were always kept under control in public, and not allowed to scream, run around untattended in restaurants, and make a nuisance of themselves in public.

Good for Continental! Keep it up.
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#13 Consumer Comment

Unlike you, I was actually on that flight

AUTHOR: Tallulah-phoebe - (U.S.A.)

I find it interesting how you are reporting this "rip off" when you did not even experience it first hand. Unlike you, I was actually on that flight, and I can tell you from first hand experience that the situation was very different than that which you are describing.

This was a VERY highly-spirited child, to say the least. He was NOT just saying "bye bye plane" in a regular speaking voice, but in a rather shrieking, annoying manner, all the while kicking other passengers' seats in front of him, trying to wrestle out of his seat during take off, causing a disturbance which prevented others from being able to hear the safety demonstration -- basically being a nuissance to all those on board.

The flight attendant was totally correct in telling the mother to settle her child down. The mother had ample opportunity to do so herself, but chose not to -- so the flight attendant stepped in to ensure the child's safety as well as the safety and comfort of others around it. Takeoff is not a time for one to allow one's child to fool around and draw attention away from important safety procedures. Also, no one on board should be forced to deal with this child's delinquent behavior, and should be able to have a pleasant flight.

Additionally, the flight attendant never ordered the mother, ""medicate your child" as you quoted. Since the mother obviously could not or would not control her own child, the flight attendant suggested that she give him some children's Benadryl, as this is what other parents with out of control children often do. This was merely a suggestion.

Since the mother WOULD NOT control her child, nor would she explore alternative methods that were suggested to her, she was removed from the plane. That was the correct thing to do. The fact that she had no diapers, no baby food, or anything else is completely her fault, no one else's. What kind of parent travels with a small child and does not carry basic necessities aboard the plane? I suppose the same kind of parent that does not know how to discipline their child either.

Also, why was the mother and child supposedly "stranded" after being kicked off the plane? They live in the Atlanta area -- they could have simply called the person who dropped them off and had them pick them back up, or taken the MARTA rail or a cab!

After witnessing this situation first hand, it is clear that the airline did what was in the best interest of the majority of the passengers on board. It is too bad that the mother felt slighted; however, she needs to learn that not everyone thinks that her little sweet-ums is the cutest thing ever, and that the world does not revolve around her. If she is not able to realize this and brush up on her parenting skills, I hope she considers alternative methods of travel in the future.
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