• Report: #513751

Complaint Review: Greater Southwest RC Club Fort Worth

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  • Submitted: Fri, October 23, 2009
  • Updated: Sat, November 14, 2009

  • Reported By: Joe — Texas USA
Greater Southwest RC Club Fort Worth
Randol Mill/820 Fort Worth TX Fort Worth, Texas United States of America

Greater Southwest RC Club Fort Worth No gate key always locked out tired of waiting Fort Worth, Texas

*Consumer Suggestion: Key Sent

*General Comment: News

*Consumer Comment: Electrics

*General Comment: Electrics

*General Comment: Electrics

*General Comment: Electrics

*General Comment: Electrics

*General Comment: Electrics

*Consumer Comment: Electrics

*Consumer Comment: Future

*Consumer Comment: Whos killing the electric plane

*Consumer Comment: My experience GSW RC Club " They dont tell you"

*Author of original report: 2 months

*Author of original report: Smiling

*Author of original report: Still no key

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After spending a high fee to join and I mean high for what it is, I still have no gate key. I give up and now fly at the park with no fees and no AMA. Don't waste your time at this club you'll be sorry. I'm too old for this. Sorry to rant but.....

J. Fort Worth

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 10/23/2009 08:54 AM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Greater-Southwest-RC-Club-Fort-Worth/Fort-Worth-Texas-/Greater-Southwest-RC-Club-Fort-Worth-No-gate-key-always-locked-out-tired-of-waiting-Fort-513751. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Consumer Suggestion

Key Sent

AUTHOR: Joe - (United States of America)

A  key has been given to this member. Everything is fine now.
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#2 General Comment

News

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Electrical aeronautics promises to revolutionize aircraft design.
GM has earned high praise this summer and deservedly so for its announcement that the forthcoming Chevy Volt electric car will get as much as much as 230 miles per gallon for in-town driving.

But while Detroit was stealing headlines on the ground, a little-known Chinese company was doing something even more incredible in the skies.

At the OshKosh AirVenture show a few weeks ago, Beijing startup Yuneec International took the wraps off the worlds first commercially produced electric aircraft, the E430.

Powered by lithium polymer batteries, weighing close to a thousand pounds, and sipping about $2.50 worth of electricity per hour of flight, the E430 has completed more than 20 hours in test runs during the last couple months, including one in Camarillo, CA, that can be seen here.

Little more has been revealed about the E430, other than some technical specifications and that it can operate for up to three hours without a charge.

Today: adding electricity-powered systems

And while the E430 may be the aircraft equivalent of an auto show concept-car, theres a good deal of progress being made in the advancement of electrical aeronautics on the whole. Whats going on with modern aircraft is a revolution, whether youre thinking about commercial or military aircraft, says Bob Smith, VP of advanced technology at Honeywell Aerospace, a unit of Honeywell (HON).

Smith doesn't mean fully electric-powered aircraft at least not yet. In aeronautic jargon, hes talking about developing More Electric Architecture (MEA). Enabled by much larger and more sophisticated next-gen aircraft and more efficient generators, Honeywell is replacing the pneumatic and hydraulic power transference systems of with new electric versions.

If you look at how much power a Boeing 777 generates, its on the order of 200-300 kilowatts. If you look at the 787, a next-gen aircraft, its 1.5 megawats, he says. Thats a massive change, because the generator technology has improved so much.

Moving power around aircraft has always been cumbersome. In last-gen aircraft, high-pressure gas is taken from the engine and transported through bleed valves to the auxiliary power system, which controls air-conditioning, for example. This is a massively inefficient process due to the energy required to heat and cool the gases and because of the weight of the systems. If you can put a more efficient generator in there, you have a power station as opposed to a boiling room, says Smith.

Electrical systems are now being used to power reverse-thrusters air brakes, essentially - in aircraft like the A380 and for de-icing wings.

The upside: gains in fuel efficiencies

But two of the greatest benefits electrical systems provide are simplicity and merely lightening the load. Eliminating hydraulic systems reduces the complexity of repairing leaks and eliminating hundreds of pounds of tubing.

This can lead to as much as 30% gains in fuel consumption. For military aircraft, such a system is revolutionary. In the F35 Joint Strike Fighter, Honeywells system carved 1,000 pounds off the weight and 11 inches off the length of the plane.

Does Honeywell have its own E430 read for prime time? Not quite, but Smith suggests the real near-term potential for fully electric aircaft comes in the form of unmanned drones. Think about light-weight drones that travel constantly, their electric systems being continually replenished by advanced technologies like super capacitors, fuel cell systems and solar power.

Once you have large power-generating systems, you have the capability of moving the power around a lot of different ways, says Smith. Then things get pretty interesting, allowing you to get into very long surveillance periods.

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#3 Consumer Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)


I am writing this on December 17th 2003, one hundred years after the Wright
brothers first flew their Flyer with a home-made 12 horsepower
gasoline engine. Ever since that day, full-scale aircraft have been powered
by gasoline, kerosene, or rocket fuel, all of which produce a significant
amount of pollution and a lot of noise. QuietFlyer readers don't like
pollution and noise, which is why we fly sailplane and/or electric models.




  







The Silent-AE1 takes flight. At altitude,
the motor is stopped, and the propeller pylon retracts into the
fuselage. Photo courtesy of Alisport.



Now, there are a number of full-scale electric powered aircraft projects,
either completed or underway. We'll look at two of them, and compare each to
a representative model.
The Silent-AE1

In the early days of electric model aircraft, one of the most common uses
for electric power was in sailplanes. Battery capacities were low, so an
application in which power was needed for only a small part of the flight
made sense. It is not surprising then that the first commercially available
full-scale electric aircraft is also a sailplane, the Silent-AE1 .

The AE1 is part of the Silent family of sailplanes
manufactured by the Alisport company of Italy. The family includes the
Silent , the engine-equipped Silent-IN , and the electric
Silent-AE1 . The following table compares the three models:




 


Silent


Silent-IN


Silent-AE1




Wing Span


12 m / 39.4 ft


12 m / 39.4 ft


12 m / 39.4 ft




Wing Area


10.3 sq.m / 111 sq.ft


10.3 sq.m / 111 sq.ft


10.3 sq.m / 111 sq.ft




Maximum Weight


240 kg / 530 lb


290 kg / 640 lb


300 kg / 660 lb




Power


n/a


21 kW / 28 hp


13 kW / 17.4 hp




Power-to-Weight


n/a


39 W/lb


20 W/lb




Maximum
Climb


n/a


500 ft/min


400 ft/min




Minimum
Sink


126 ft/min


138 ft/min


154 ft/min










  




Front view of the Silent-AE1 . Photo courtesy of Alisport.



Both the Silent-IN and the Silent-AE1 have the propeller on
the end of a pylon that is hinged just behind the cockpit, and retracts
backwards into the fuselage for gliding flight. The propeller folds, but
unlike a model folding propeller, the blades fold downward instead of
backward.

Like a model electric sailplane, full-power duration is short, at about 5
minutes. This is enough power for one climb to about 2,000 feet. In good
thermalling conditions, that is high enough for a competent sailplane pilot
to find some lift and have a nice long flight. Even with no lift, 18 minute
flights are possible.

The AE1 uses a Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) battery consisting of 12
parallel packs of 60 cells each (for a total of 720 cells), producing 72V
with a capacity of approximately 20 Ah. Doing a bit of arithmetic, one
arrives at a per-cell capacity of 1.7 Ah. The battery weighs 88 lbs, which
gives a weight just under 2 oz per cell (including interconnections), which
suggests that 1700SCR cells are being used.




  






Close-up of the base of the propeller pylon. The
cogged drive belt is clearly visible, as are the tips of the folded
propeller blades. Photo courtesy of Alisport.



The maximum motor power input is 16 kW at 72 V, giving a current of 220 A,
or 18 A per 60-cell pack. It appears that it may be possible to substitute
more modern cells, such as 2.4 Ah NiCd or 3.3 Ah NiMH SubC cells, which
could double the available motor run-time with little or no weight increase.
The use of Lithium Polymer cells could more than double the capacity again,
although that would cost a large fortune (as opposed to a small fortune for
the NiCd or NiMH option).
An Equivalent Model Sailplane

I've chosen a Great Planes Spectra model to compare with the
Silent AE1 . A Spectra typically weighs about 3 lb, which makes it
approximately 1/6 scale (using the cube-root weight rule of scaling). This
corresponds exactly to the ratio of wingspans (2m for the Spectra
versus 12m for the AE1 ), confirming the choice of 1/6 as the scale
factor.

Another rule of scaling models (see my column,
Scale Electric Design , in the
October 2002 issue) is that the power-to-weight ratio remains about the same.
This means that our 3 lb Spectra should have approximately 60W of power
to have performance comparable to the AE1 's. That translates into a
7-cell battery and a Speed 400 6V motor, which is much less power than even the
stock power system provided by Great Planes.
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#4 General Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

By John Morris

The arrival of a Chinese-built electric-powered aircraft at the Experimental Aircraft Assn.'s AirVenture 2009 has sharpened the focus on making the technology commercially viable.

Industrialization will be key, bringing economies of scale that will in turn spur further development of lighter, more powerful fuel sources than today's lithium polymer battery packs. And Shanghai-based Yuneec International might prove to be the catalyst to accelerate the technology into the commercial arena, making economic electric flight possible for sport pilots and, eventually, heavier aircraft and military UAVs.

"The motors and the electronics are already here and are scalable," notes Clive Coote, managing director of Yuneec International, a company owned by Chinese entrepreneur and electrical engineer Tian Yu. His business conglomerate is the world's largest manufacturer of ready-to-go radio-controlled model aircraft with an emphasis on electrical powerplants.

"We said let's do something bigger," says Coote. And construction is now underway in China on a 260,000-sq.-ft. factory that will employ 250 making all of Tian's electrical model and Yuneec electric products. An aircraft factory will follow.

Yuneec has been building air-cooled, brushless electric motors of 10 kw./23 hp. and 20 kw./27 hp. for parasail and ultralight aircraft, and has developed the 40-kw./54-hp. motor that powers its Yuneec E430, which arrived at Oshkosh with 21.5 flight hours on it. "We are planning production for mid-2010," notes Coote.

What buyers will receive is an all-composite, two-seat motorglider-type aircraft with a maximum takeoff weight of 1,034 lb. It will fit the Light Sport Aircraft category when the FAA adjusts the rules to allow electric power. (The current language specifying piston power was written to exclude jets and turbines.)

Endurance, utility and speed are the three big questions. Yuneec estimates that the aircraft will fly 1.5-2.0 hr. at optimum cruise of 60 mph. with two people on board and with the standard six batteries installed. Much depends on the aircraft's aerodynamic efficiency, which will be explored as flight testing gets underway. Recharging the batteries on the ground takes 3-4 hr.

The three-phase motor - which has magnets and sensors on the rotor and stator to provide optimum phase timing through sophisticated electronics in the engine and battery management controller - runs at a maximum 200 volts and 400 amps. In cruise, it turns over at just 1,800 rpm.

Batteries will need replacing every 600 cycles, or roughly every 1,200 hr. of flying, at a cost of about $20,000. While that sounds like a lot of money, Coote points out that with electricity adding up to $3 an hour, the operating costs work out around $25-30 an hour, or somewhat lower than for a piston engine. And there is no maintenance on the electric motor, he points out. It is oilless and needs nothing more than its two bearings replaced every few thousand hours, a task that takes 1 hr.

Critical to the system - and safety - is the battery charger, which has been developed to charge each cell within 5 millivolts. Every part of the system is sealed to prevent electrocuting the pilot or mechanics.

In Coote's view, today's battery specific-energy density of 170 kwh./kg. needs to be doubled "to make electric power really interesting." Yuneec will be manufacturing its own batteries and will work toward that goal, he says. (For more details, go to www.yuneec.com)

The U.S. is making technological progress as well. Randall Fishman has more than 70 flight hours on the Sonex motorglider-based electric airplane that he flew to Oshkosh last year. It has a liquid-cooled brushless motor and lithium polymer batteries of his own manufacture. His Electric Aircraft Corp. in Cliffside Park, N.J., will offer the soon-to-fly composite ElectraFlyer-X as a kit for $65,000, plus another $15,000 for batteries.

He expects the new airplane will use 37 kw./50 hp. for takeoff and just 6 kw./8 hp. to cruise at 80 mph., giving an endurance of up to 2 hr. Fishman believes industrialization is key to future development, and he plans to ramp up production of the aircraft, batteries and electrical components as demand grows. Making his own batteries will ensure quality control, he adds, as it is not consistent from outside suppliers. (For more details, go to www.ElectraFlyer.com)

Oshkosh-based Sonex Aircraft is now three years into its goal to develop an all-electric sport aircraft, a project that it recognized from the start would be "extremely difficult," as it determined to make everything but the lithium polymer batteries itself.

Its E-Flight team is now integrating the system into the test aircraft, a factory Waiex, and hopes for first flight before year-end.

A major breakthrough in Sonex's proprietary technology has been the use of the 55-kw./75-hp. brushless motor's own back-EMF signal for commutation, providing extremely accurate timing, following unsatisfactory results with a Hall Effect sensor ring. Other challenges included overheating of the motor on ground tests. That problem has been overcome by increasing the cooling air and reducing a gap between the winding and the motor barrel.

"This is one of the largest, most powerful systems devised for an aircraft," says Sonex's Mark Schaible. "There just wasn't anything out there of that size at the right cost."

A lot of effort has been expended on isolating the airplane's low-voltage systems, such as avionics and throttle-by-wire, from the high-voltage runs.

The E-Flight Waiex is designed to be aerobatic and reach 130 mph., although at that speed its endurance might be reduced to a mere 15 min. A more moderate hand on the throttle could extend it to 45 min.; Sonex is expecting battery power densities to double in the next 3-5 years. "We wanted to debunk the notion that electric power is only for motorgliders," says Schaible. The company hopes to price E-Flight Waiex kits for less than $50,000 in 2007 dollars. (For more details, go to www.AeroConversions.com/e-flight)

Also at Oshkosh was PC-Aero of Landsberg am Lech, Germany. The company's president, Calin Gologan, plans to compete with an electric-powered aircraft of his own design for the $1.65-million prize to be offered in 2011 by NASA/CAFE (Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency) Foundation's "Green Flight Challenge." This calls for a two-seat aircraft to fly on less than a gallon of fuel or 33.7 kwh. at 100 mph. for more than 200 mi., or 0.5 gal./16.85 kwh. for a single-seater. Gologan, who worked as a consultant designer on the Yuneec airplane, is basing his design around a Yuneec power system.

Gologan expects electric airplanes to come into their own in 5-10 years "when the cost of batteries will be halved and the price of fuel doubled." At that point four-seaters will be feasible - and he already has one on the drawing board.

Within a decade, completely carbon-neutral flying will be possible, Gologan asserts. He is already pursuing technology for "green village" airports where electric aircraft will charge up overnight on solar cell or wind-generated power-feeding communal storage batteries. (For more details, go to www.pc-aero.de)

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#5 General Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Having worked through a series of delays that included budget
issues, The Boeing Co. plans the first test flight of a fuel-cell
powered electric airplane in late 2004 or early 2005.
The project, which is being led by Boeing's Research and Technology
Center in Madrid, Spain, could eventually lead to the application of
fuel-cell technology on commercial jetliners.
Boeing will announce today its partners on the project to study and
evaluate what will be the world's first fuel-cell powered aircraft.
As expected, Boeing chose Intelligent Energy of Britain to provide
the fuel-cell hardware for the plane, a motorized glider built by an
Austrian firm.
In May, Intelligent Energy, whose chairman, Sir John Jennings, is
the former chairman of Shell Oil, announced that Boeing had selected it
as a partner on the project. Boeing strongly criticized the company,
saying it had authorized no such announcement.
Intelligent Energy quickly removed any mention of the Boeing project from its Web site.
But now it's official.



Boeing's other partners that will be announced today are: Diamond
Aircraft of Austria; the Spanish engineering company Sener, which will
develop the control system that integrates the power from the fuel
cells and batteries; Aerlyper, another Spanish company, which will
integrate the electric motor into the plane and make airframe
modifications; and Advanced Technology Products, a U.S. company that
will supply the plane's motor and batteries and perform the flight
testing.
When Boeing announced the electric plane project in November 2001,
it said the first test flights could begin in early 2004. There was
even speculation the first flight might come in time for the 100th
anniversary of the Wright Brothers first powered flight this Dec. 17.
That schedule has since been pushed back by nearly a year.
The work to integrate the fuel cells into the demonstration plane is
expected to begin at the end of this summer, Boeing said. That would
allow test flights to start in late 2004 or early 2005.
The plane will be a modified version of Diamond's Katana Xtreme Motorglider, or the Super Dimona as it is known in Europe.
A fuel cell, batteries and electric motor will replace the standard
piston engine on the Super Dimona. The modified plane will be flown by
one pilot, with the cockpit space for the co-pilot taken up by the fuel
cell.
Fuel cells were initially developed for the space program and
produce electricity through the chemical reaction of hydrogen and
oxygen. The only waste byproducts are water and heat.
As a clean power source, Boeing hopes fuel cells might eventually be
used on commercial jetliners. One possible use would be as a
replacement for the not-so-clean gas-turbine auxiliary power units, or
APUs, that generate electricity while jetliners are on the ground. They
are also a backup electrical supply during flight.
Boeing said two universities in Spain will collaborate on the
project. The Polytechnic University of Catalonia will study the
potential failure modes of fuel-cell power generation. The Polytechnic
University of Madrid will test a subscale version of the fuel cell that
will power the plane.
Intelligent Energy is involved in a number of projects for the future use of fuel cells.
In South Africa, trials are under way using Intelligent Energy fuel
cells to power homes, small hospitals and schools. Intelligent Energy
also has acquired a California company that supplies hydrogen to the
state's bus companies.
For the Boeing project, Intelligent Energy will provide a 20
kilowatt fuel cell, which Boeing said will provide sufficient power for
straight and level flight of the Super Dimona. Additional power for
takeoff and climb will come from lithium-ion batteries.
The electric motor will produce about 50 kilowatts.
The plane will have conventional controls.
P-I aerospace reporter James Wallace can be reached at 206-448-8040 or jameswallace@seattlepi.com
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#6 General Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Conventional Light Aircraft with Electric Motor Makes First Flight; Channel Crossing Planned for 2009

4 January 2008

Electra_231207a
The Electra in flight.

A conventional light aircraft propelled by an 18 kW electric motor powered by lithium polymer batteries made its first flight late in December in France. The 48-minute flight of the Electra covered more than 50 kilometers (31 miles).

The single-seater, based on a Sourciette kit aircraft, is the product of APAME (Association pour la Promotion des Aronefs Motorisation lectrique, Association to Promote Electrical Aircraft), with the support of a number of partners.

The wood and fabric Electra is 7m in length, with a wingspan of 9m. Weight of the aircraft without batteries is 134 kg. The battery pack weights 47 kg. Maximum takeoff weight is 265 kg. The aircraft has a cruise speed of 90 km/h.

Blorigine
Blriot preparing for the Channel crossing in 1909.

APAME plans to cross the English Channel in July 2009 with the Electra100 years after the first crossing of the Channel by Louis Blriot in his prototype Blriot XI.

(A hattip to Clett!)

January 4, 2008 in Aviation, Electric (Battery) | Permalink | Comments (22) | TrackBack (0)

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#7 General Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

A number of pioneers have been chipping away at the problems involved in creating electrically powered aircraft. A variety of approaches are being actively pursued and as yet it is not clear which direction will prove to be the most successful. Contemporary electric motors are already up to the job of powering aircraft up to the light twin level with motors up to 500 kwatts being feasible and available but the problem of power storage or fuel remains opaque to really successful commercially useful solution. Exceptions to this are some niche application such as drones and long duration UAVs where applications are being perfected now.

It has been claimed that the first commercially available electricity-powered plane will revolutionize aircraft design.
GM has earned high praise this summer and deservedly so for its announcement that the forthcoming Chevy Volt electric car will get as much as much as 230 miles per gallon for in-town driving. But while Detroit was stealing headlines on the ground, a little-known Chinese company was doing something even more incredible in the skies. At the Oshkosh AirVenture show a few weeks ago, Beijing startup Yuneec International took the wraps off the worlds first commercially produced electric aircraft, the E430. Powered by lithium polymer batteries, weighing close to a thousand pounds, and sipping about $2.50 worth of electricity per hour of flight, the E430 has completed more than 20 hours in test runs during the last couple months, including one in Camarillo, CA, that can be seen here. Little more has been revealed about the E430, other than some technical specifications and that it can operate for up to three hours without a charge.
While the E430 may be the aircraft equivalent of an auto show concept-car, theres a good deal of progress being made in the advancement of electrical aeronautics on the whole. Whats going on with modern aircraft is a revolution, whether youre thinking about commercial or military aircraft, says Bob Smith, VP of advanced technology at Honeywell Aerospace, a unit of Honeywell (HON). Smith doesnt mean fully electric-powered aircraft at least not yet. In aeronautic jargon, hes talking about developing More Electric Architecture (MEA). Enabled by much larger and more sophisticated next -gen aircraft and more efficient generators, Honeywell is replacing the pneumatic and hydraulic power transference systems of with new electric versions. If you look at how much power a Boeing 777 generates, its on the order of 200-300 kilowatts. If you look at the 787, a next-gen aircraft, its 1.5 megawatts, he says. Thats a massive change, because the generator technology has improved so much. Moving power around aircraft has always been cumbersome. In last-gen aircraft, high-pressure gas is taken from the engine and transported through bleed valves to the auxiliary power system, which controls air -conditioning, for example. This is a massively inefficient process due to the energy required to heat and cool the gases and because of the weight of the systems. If you can put a more efficient generator in there, you have a power station as opposed to a boiling room, says Smith. Electrical systems are now being used to power reverse-thrusters air brakes, essentially in aircraft like the A380 and for de-icing wings. The upside: gains in fuel efficiencies But two of the greatest benefits electrical systems provide are simplicity and merely lightening the load. Eliminating hydraulic systems reduces the complexity of repairing leaks and eliminating hundreds of pounds of tubing. This can lead to as much as 30% gains in fuel consumption. For military aircraft, such a system is revolutionary. In the F35 Joint Strike Fighter, Honeywells system carved 1,000 pounds off the weight and 11 inches off the length of the plane.
Does Honeywell have its own E430 read for prime time? Not quite, but Smith agrees the real near-term potential for fully electric aircraft comes in the form of unmanned drones. Think about light-weight drones that travel constantly, their electric systems being continually replenished by advanced technologies like super capacitors, fuel cell systems and solar power. Once you have large power-generating systems, you have the capability of moving the power around a lot of different ways, says Smith. Then things get pretty interesting, allowing you to get into very long surveillance periods.
Some content From http://brainstormtech.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2009/08/24/the-future-
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#8 General Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Plug and Play - And It's Good For The Environment

The crowd surrounded the small yellow Sonex plane at AeroShell
Square, waiting for answers. Electric? Ethanol? What will Sonex
Founder and President John Monnett would be announcing at Tuesday's
press conference about his company's E-Flight Initiative?




Following company accolades by Tom Poberezny concerning the
company's craftsmanship and its endeavors to improve and grow
aviation in the future, Monnett took to the podium and made it
officia --l by introducing the proof of concept prototype electric
motor powerplant, controller, battery pack and charging systems
installed in a Waiex airframe.

The proof-of-concept looks exactly like a Sonex from the
outside, but uses the alternative energy source.

And for the ethanol crowd, he noted AeroConversion's
investigation of converting its versions Aero Vee 2.0 powerplant
for use of both ethanol-based fuels. More on that Wednesday,
though.

The goal of the electric proof-of-concept, according to Sonex,
is to determine the feasibility of a marketable line of Sonex and
prototype products.

With the current Sonex staff focused on customer service and
sales, it was only a small group of folks from AeroConversion who
focused their energies on the new concept, which only took six
months from idea to concept plane.

The current non-electric Sonex is a kit-based, basic all-metal
two place monoplace suited for the US Sport Pilot.

And for those looking under the cowling to see which company's
battery was being used in the proof-of-concept, they were
disappointed.




Noted Sonex's Director of Public Relations Mark Schaible, the
motor and battery system named no names: "They are proprietary
parts we are in the process of developing."

The motor, said Schaible, is more than 90 percent efficient...
and the most powerful of its kind. In regard to battery power, most
contemporary electric powerplants for gas-electric and pure
electric cars and previous generations of RC electric vehicles
utilize Lithium Ion battery technology.

While much improved in power density and discharge rate over
lead-acid and NiCad batteries, Li-Ion batteries still do not offer
sufficient power discharge-to-weight ratio to support an electric
powerplant for an aircraft based on battery power alone with
market-viable endurance.

Newer RC electric vehicles, cell phones, laptop computers and
other mobile devices have been moving toward Lithium Polymer cells,
which can safely discharge at a rate of 25 times their capacity, or
"25c."

The so-called "E-Flight Team" engineered and constructed 10
battery "safe boxes" to contain eight Li-Poly battery packs per box
and consolidate their charge/discharge and balancing wiring into
two sets of multi-pin connectors.

The boxes will accommodate natural cell expansion and
contraction while safely securing each cell pack and facilitating
cell cooling with "cooling foam" padding. The boxes are designed to
contain and safely direct fire or explosion within the box through
a "blow hole" in the box connected to a small exhaust manifold.

For the proof-of-concept plane, the battery boxes are removed
and charged individually.

Further generations of safer, more powerful Li-Poly batteries
show the near-term possibility of further extended flight
durations, from the current 45 minutes to one hour, while personal
electronics and transportation will undoubtedly continue to push
improvement of the technology in years to come.


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#9 Consumer Comment

Electrics

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Electric airplanes are experiencing a development boom similar to that seen during the first airplanes 100 years ago. Electric cars are getting all the headlines, but aircraft designers around the world are working at a feverish pitch to bring to market an electric airplane that meets Federal Aviation Administration standards. An electric airplane flew at Airventure, the massive annual airshow in Oshkosh, Wisc., for the first time last year.

Randall Fishman, the designer/pilot who flew his single seat ElectraFlyer-C at Oshkosh last summer, continues developing the plane and hopes to return to Airventure this year with a two-seat version. Another person who Peghiny says has been a help and inspiration is Mark Beierle, who is developing an electric powered version of his own ultralight called the eGull.

Peghiny is the president of Flight Design USA, which imports light sport aircraft from Germany, as well as the man behind the Flightstar ultralights. While visiting the Aero Expo in Friedrichshafen, Germany in April, he met Tian Lu, the visionary behind Yuneecs electric propulsion system. The two signed an agreement to develop an FAA-legal electric ultralight, and Peghiny has been working on it ever since. His goal was to have it ready for Airventure, which starts next week. Yuneec will be there too with its own electric motor glider. Other electric airplanes also are expected at Oshkosh, and the whisper-quiet aircraft might steal the show from the usual assortment of thundering World War II fighters, deafening Harrier jump jet and impressive giants like the Airbus A380.

Single seat ultralights are regulated by the FAA and must meet specific requirements to be sold in the United States. No pilots license is required, though training is of course recommended. Peghiny says the e-Spyder should be available within next four months with a price tag somewhere around $24,000.

Peghiny says the e-Spyder is easy to fly and its real nice not having all the shaking and coughing associated with the two-stroke engine that powers a conventional Flightstar Spyder.

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#10 Consumer Comment

Future

AUTHOR: What went on - (USA)

Developers around the world are currently working on innovations in electric aircraft design. Breakthroughs in fuel cell technology, engine and even propeller design continue to push the boundaries of what is possible with electric airpower. Here are a few examples of just what the future of flight might hold:

The Pipistrel Taurus Electro: This particular electric aircraft looks a lot like an ultralight glider, because that's basically what it is. The catch is that two lithium-polymer battery packs drive a top-mounted propeller with a 31-pound (14-kilogram), 30-killowatt electric motor. This allows the experimental craft to take off on its own rather than depend on another plane serving as a tug.

The Yuneec E430: China's Yuneec International hopes to be the first to offer a commercially available electric airplane. Its E430 plane seats two, reportedly charges in three hours and runs for two and half hours when fully charged -- all at a cost of $89,000 [source: Gizmag]. It depends on 159 pounds (72 killograms) of lithium polymer batteries. The company plans to begin sales in 2010.

The SkySpark: This 100-percent electric aircraft made headlines in June 2009 when it set the world air speed record for an all-electric airplane: 155 miles per hour (250 kilometers per hour). The plane is essentially a modified Pioneer Alpi 300, powered by a 75-kilowatt electric motor and a bank of lithium polymer batteries. The plane is the product of independent startup DigiSky and Turin Polytechnic University. For their next step, the developers plan to power the engine with hydrogen fuel cells.

As for future projects, the sky's the limit to what designers may attempt. For instance, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk boldly proposed the development of a supersonic electronic airplane at a 2009 summit. While this sort of technology is still quite a ways off, it certainly shows where battery power may take us.

Explore the links on the next page to learn even more about human flight and green technology.

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#11 Consumer Comment

Whos killing the electric plane

AUTHOR: The realstory - (USA)

Even as the federal government jump-starts electric cars with $2.4 billion in research funds, electric airplanes are getting held back. In fact, current Federal Aviation Administration rules prohibit electric motors in light sport aircraft, a class of planes typically flown by less experienced pilots. The FAA decrees that LSAs be powered only by reciprocating engines, a measure intended to keep high-powered turbine engines out of the hands of novice sport pilots. This rule is now thwarting the sale of electric airplanes in the United States. Were reluctant to introduce new technology on a less experienced pilot population, says the FAAs Steve Flanagan, who helped write the LSA rules. We need to get some more flight experience with electric motors. That position is frustrating to Randall Fishman, an ultralight pilot whos currently developing an electric two-seat sport plane, the ElectraFlyer-X. The $65,000 kit plane is being designed to LSA specifications so it can quickly go into production if and when the FAA gives electric airplane motors the

The Next-Gen Electric Plane

Aviation designers around the world are experimenting with novel electric-power designs. The Boeing Fuel Cell Demonstrator combines a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and lithium-ion battery to power its electric motor. In January French designers flew the Alatus electric glider for the first time and plan to sell it this year, taking advantage of their freedom from the rules that limit U.S. companies. Makers of the Sonex E-Flight, made in Wisconsin, hope data from their plane will help shape new FAA rules.

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#12 Consumer Comment

My experience GSW RC Club " They dont tell you"

AUTHOR: The realstory - (USA)

  At the GSW RC club they don't tell you what it really is all about. The club is only for "Gas and Scale". This is hidden in a way. They should be more upfront about it. If you fly smaller models you are told to fly on a tiny portion over on one side. They do seem to smile alot at this club. I had a gut feeling that something was slightly amiss when joining.
If you don't fly "Gas and Scale" you will be wasting your time here. Its a lesson learned.

 Anyone could start their own club since these only use a garbage dump. Park flying is closer and much cheaper.


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#13 Author of original report

2 months

AUTHOR: Joe - (USA)

2 months is long enough.
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#14 Author of original report

Smiling

AUTHOR: Joe - (USA)

These guys were always smiling when they issued my club card.
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#15 Author of original report

Still no key

AUTHOR: Joe - (USA)

2 months is long enough for a "copy" of a key. Sorry but even if they offer on here I'm not buying it period nor am I driving anywhere to meet an officer who never shows. Save it for someone else.
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