• Report: #117562

Complaint Review: METRO CAPITAL

Thank You

Read how Ripoff Report saves consumers millions.

  • Submitted: Fri, November 12, 2004
  • Updated: Sun, November 14, 2004

  • Reported By:IMPERAIL California
METRO CAPITAL
COLORDO SPRINGS, Colorado U.S.A.
  • Phone:
  • Web:
  • Category: Loans

METRO CAPITAL ripoff THE COMPANY ASK TO ME TO WIRE MONEY OVER 1300 FOR A 13,000 LOAN. THEN WHEN I SENT THE MONEY THE COPANY NEVER DEPOSIT MY MONEY INTO MY ACCOUNT COLORDO SPRINGS Colorado

*Consumer Comment: Consumer Fraud 101

*Consumer Suggestion: Advanced Fee Scheme

*Consumer Suggestion: Advanced Fee Scheme

*Consumer Suggestion: Advanced Fee Scheme

*Consumer Suggestion: Advanced Fee Scheme

What's this?
What's this?
What's this?
Is this
Ripoff Report
About you?
Ripoff Report
A business' first
line of defense
on the Internet.
If your business is
willing to make a
commitment to
customer satisfaction
Click here now..

Does your business have a bad reputation?
Fix it the right way.
Corporate Advocacy Program™

SEO Reputation Management at its best!

THE COMPANY METRO CAPITAL RIPPED ME OFF. I CAN'T EVEN GET A HOLD OF THEM. I WAS REALLY OF NEED OF THE MONEY AND THEY TOOK ADAVNGTEGE OF ME AND MY FAMILY. THE DEAL WAS TO SEND MONEY MONEY TO THEM 1300 BUCKS AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT 13000 INTO MY ACCT. SO THE PEOPLE HAVE MY ACCT #.THEY NEVER SEND IT. I CALL THE MONEY GRAM WHERE I SEND THE MONEY TO COLORADO SPRINGS COLO. A MICHEAL RURFORT PICK UP THE MONEY AND SENT TO CANADA.

Richard
IMPERAIL, California
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 11/12/2004 06:47 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/METRO-CAPITAL/COLORDO-SPRINGS-Colorado/METRO-CAPITAL-ripoff-THE-COMPANY-ASK-TO-ME-TO-WIRE-MONEY-OVER-1300-FOR-A-13000-LOAN-THEN-117562. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report.

Click Here to read other Ripoff Reports on METRO CAPITAL

Search for additional reports

If you would like to see more Rip-off Reports on this company/individual, search here:

Search Tips
Report & Rebuttal
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Also a victim?
What's this?
Repair Your Reputation!
What's this?
REBUTTALS & REPLIES:
0Author 5Consumer 0Employee/Owner
Updates & Rebuttals

#1 Consumer Comment

Consumer Fraud 101

AUTHOR: Curt - (U.S.A.)

didnt it sound funny when they wanted you to send money in first place?? you never send money to get money in return...Consumer Fraud 101
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#2 Consumer Suggestion

Advanced Fee Scheme

AUTHOR: Scott - (U.S.A.)

Hi Richard;

Your problem is quite a common one, its a scam called the advanced fee scheme. Where you a certain dollar amount and they send you a larger sum in return.

Because the money was sent from US Soil and Picked up US Soil, the FBI may be able to help you out, contact the local field office you can get that information from their website.

Wish you luck in getting your money back....
-----------

Advanced Fee Scheme (directly from www.fbi.gov):

An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value, such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift, and then receives little or nothing in return.

The variety of advance fee schemes is limited only by the imagination of the conartists who offer them. They may involve the sale of products or services, the offering of investments, lottery winnings, "found money," or many other "opportunities." Clever conartists will offer to find financing arrangements for their clients who pay a "finder's fee" in advance. They require their clients to sign contracts in which they agree to pay the fee when they are introduced to the financing source. Victims often learn that they are ineligible for financing only after they have paid the "finder" according to the contract. Such agreements may be legal unless it can be shown that the "finder" never had the intention or the ability to provide financing for the victims.

Some Tips to Avoid the Advanced Fee Schemes:

If the offer of an "opportunity" appears too good to be true, it probably is. Follow common business practice. For example, legitimate business is rarely conducted in cash on a street corner.
Know who you are dealing with. If you have not heard of a person or company that you intend to do business with, learn more about them. Depending on the amount of money that you intend to spend, you may want to visit the business location, check with the Better Business Bureau, or consult with your bank, an attorney, or the police.
Make sure you fully understand any business agreement that you enter into. If the terms are complex, have them reviewed by a competent attorney.
Be wary of businesses that operate out of post office boxes or mail drops and do not have a street address, or of dealing with persons who do not have a direct telephone line, who are never "in" when you call, but always return your call later.
Be wary of business deals that require you to sign nondisclosure or noncircumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying the bona fides of the people with whom you intend to do business. Conartists often use noncircumvention agreements to threaten their victims with civil suit if they report their losses to law enforcement.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#3 Consumer Suggestion

Advanced Fee Scheme

AUTHOR: Scott - (U.S.A.)

Hi Richard;

Your problem is quite a common one, its a scam called the advanced fee scheme. Where you a certain dollar amount and they send you a larger sum in return.

Because the money was sent from US Soil and Picked up US Soil, the FBI may be able to help you out, contact the local field office you can get that information from their website.

Wish you luck in getting your money back....
-----------

Advanced Fee Scheme (directly from www.fbi.gov):

An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value, such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift, and then receives little or nothing in return.

The variety of advance fee schemes is limited only by the imagination of the conartists who offer them. They may involve the sale of products or services, the offering of investments, lottery winnings, "found money," or many other "opportunities." Clever conartists will offer to find financing arrangements for their clients who pay a "finder's fee" in advance. They require their clients to sign contracts in which they agree to pay the fee when they are introduced to the financing source. Victims often learn that they are ineligible for financing only after they have paid the "finder" according to the contract. Such agreements may be legal unless it can be shown that the "finder" never had the intention or the ability to provide financing for the victims.

Some Tips to Avoid the Advanced Fee Schemes:

If the offer of an "opportunity" appears too good to be true, it probably is. Follow common business practice. For example, legitimate business is rarely conducted in cash on a street corner.
Know who you are dealing with. If you have not heard of a person or company that you intend to do business with, learn more about them. Depending on the amount of money that you intend to spend, you may want to visit the business location, check with the Better Business Bureau, or consult with your bank, an attorney, or the police.
Make sure you fully understand any business agreement that you enter into. If the terms are complex, have them reviewed by a competent attorney.
Be wary of businesses that operate out of post office boxes or mail drops and do not have a street address, or of dealing with persons who do not have a direct telephone line, who are never "in" when you call, but always return your call later.
Be wary of business deals that require you to sign nondisclosure or noncircumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying the bona fides of the people with whom you intend to do business. Conartists often use noncircumvention agreements to threaten their victims with civil suit if they report their losses to law enforcement.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#4 Consumer Suggestion

Advanced Fee Scheme

AUTHOR: Scott - (U.S.A.)

Hi Richard;

Your problem is quite a common one, its a scam called the advanced fee scheme. Where you a certain dollar amount and they send you a larger sum in return.

Because the money was sent from US Soil and Picked up US Soil, the FBI may be able to help you out, contact the local field office you can get that information from their website.

Wish you luck in getting your money back....
-----------

Advanced Fee Scheme (directly from www.fbi.gov):

An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value, such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift, and then receives little or nothing in return.

The variety of advance fee schemes is limited only by the imagination of the conartists who offer them. They may involve the sale of products or services, the offering of investments, lottery winnings, "found money," or many other "opportunities." Clever conartists will offer to find financing arrangements for their clients who pay a "finder's fee" in advance. They require their clients to sign contracts in which they agree to pay the fee when they are introduced to the financing source. Victims often learn that they are ineligible for financing only after they have paid the "finder" according to the contract. Such agreements may be legal unless it can be shown that the "finder" never had the intention or the ability to provide financing for the victims.

Some Tips to Avoid the Advanced Fee Schemes:

If the offer of an "opportunity" appears too good to be true, it probably is. Follow common business practice. For example, legitimate business is rarely conducted in cash on a street corner.
Know who you are dealing with. If you have not heard of a person or company that you intend to do business with, learn more about them. Depending on the amount of money that you intend to spend, you may want to visit the business location, check with the Better Business Bureau, or consult with your bank, an attorney, or the police.
Make sure you fully understand any business agreement that you enter into. If the terms are complex, have them reviewed by a competent attorney.
Be wary of businesses that operate out of post office boxes or mail drops and do not have a street address, or of dealing with persons who do not have a direct telephone line, who are never "in" when you call, but always return your call later.
Be wary of business deals that require you to sign nondisclosure or noncircumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying the bona fides of the people with whom you intend to do business. Conartists often use noncircumvention agreements to threaten their victims with civil suit if they report their losses to law enforcement.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#5 Consumer Suggestion

Advanced Fee Scheme

AUTHOR: Scott - (U.S.A.)

Hi Richard;

Your problem is quite a common one, its a scam called the advanced fee scheme. Where you a certain dollar amount and they send you a larger sum in return.

Because the money was sent from US Soil and Picked up US Soil, the FBI may be able to help you out, contact the local field office you can get that information from their website.

Wish you luck in getting your money back....
-----------

Advanced Fee Scheme (directly from www.fbi.gov):

An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value, such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift, and then receives little or nothing in return.

The variety of advance fee schemes is limited only by the imagination of the conartists who offer them. They may involve the sale of products or services, the offering of investments, lottery winnings, "found money," or many other "opportunities." Clever conartists will offer to find financing arrangements for their clients who pay a "finder's fee" in advance. They require their clients to sign contracts in which they agree to pay the fee when they are introduced to the financing source. Victims often learn that they are ineligible for financing only after they have paid the "finder" according to the contract. Such agreements may be legal unless it can be shown that the "finder" never had the intention or the ability to provide financing for the victims.

Some Tips to Avoid the Advanced Fee Schemes:

If the offer of an "opportunity" appears too good to be true, it probably is. Follow common business practice. For example, legitimate business is rarely conducted in cash on a street corner.
Know who you are dealing with. If you have not heard of a person or company that you intend to do business with, learn more about them. Depending on the amount of money that you intend to spend, you may want to visit the business location, check with the Better Business Bureau, or consult with your bank, an attorney, or the police.
Make sure you fully understand any business agreement that you enter into. If the terms are complex, have them reviewed by a competent attorney.
Be wary of businesses that operate out of post office boxes or mail drops and do not have a street address, or of dealing with persons who do not have a direct telephone line, who are never "in" when you call, but always return your call later.
Be wary of business deals that require you to sign nondisclosure or noncircumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying the bona fides of the people with whom you intend to do business. Conartists often use noncircumvention agreements to threaten their victims with civil suit if they report their losses to law enforcement.
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Report & Rebuttal
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Also a victim?
What's this?
Repair Your Reputation!
What's this?

Advertisers above have met our
strict standards for business conduct.