• Report: #349972

Complaint Review: T-Mobile

Thank You

Read how Ripoff Report saves consumers millions.

  • Submitted: Fri, July 11, 2008
  • Updated: Sun, July 15, 2012

  • Reported By:Van Nuys California
T-Mobile
www.tmobile.com Los Angeles, California United States of America

T-Mobile Yahoo Messenger was not explained it'd be charged as text, thus it wasn't "unlimited internet and email", charged $300 in overages, Jason from Executive Customer Relations under CEO R. Dotson was rude, manipulative. Albuquerque New Mexico

*Consumer Suggestion: That's not what you asked

*Consumer Suggestion: That's not what you asked

*Consumer Suggestion: That's not what you asked

*Consumer Suggestion: That's not what you asked

*Consumer Suggestion: When in doubt....make sure

What's this?
What's this?
What's this?
Is this
Ripoff Report
About you?
Ripoff Report
A business' first
line of defense
on the Internet.
If your business is
willing to make a
commitment to
customer satisfaction
Click here now..

Does your business have a bad reputation?
Fix it the right way.
Corporate Advocacy Program™

SEO Reputation Management at its best!

Summary: T-Mobile reps did not tell me Yahoo Messenger was charged as a text message. They told me I had unlimited email, internet browsing. On my home computer, you have to log onto the internet to get onto Yahoo Messenger. So I thought logging through the icon was also unlimited internet. They charged me $300 in overages, and gave me a measely $30 credit after I spoke with Jason from Executive Customer Relations. Little did I know, that once I accepted the $30 credit, that the dispute was "closed" even though I was still unhappy with the results. Furthermore, I had to go out of my way to ask T-Mobile reps what their promotions were. When I asked,"What are my options in dealing with this text issue?", my options were to press. #674 to keep track of messages, stop using Yahoo Messenger, and was pressured to pay the bill. At no time did the customer services reps say, "Well you could upgrade your plan by $4.99 for 1000 text messages or $14.99 for unlimited text messages". I had to call back on 2-3 occasions to specificly ask if they had text messaging plans, and what they were.

Furthermore, Jason from Executive Customer Relations under CEO Robert Dotson was who I delt with directly. I would email the CEO, Robert Dotson, and this Jason guy would call me to address the issue. My contract is up June 2009, and he offered to give me a plan with no contract. Well if my plan is up in June 2009, and I accepted his offer, I would only have one month that I didn't have to be in contract, which wasn't worth it to me. Oh great, I get to not be in contract with T-Mobile for one month at the cost of $270 in overages they charged me because they couldn't explain how their services were charged when I specificly asked, nor would they even tell me to upgrade my text message plans by letting me know they even existed.

The worst was this morning, when Jason pressured me to either accept his offer, or he threatened to end the call. You could tell he was really in a rush to get off the phone, So when I declined his offer, he wanted to end the conversation. So when I asked him to explain his offer a little bit more, he said, "The offer is no longer available since you declined it." He had withdrew his horrible "offer" within the timeframe of the same phone conversation.

Please help, if anyone has suggestions. I am sending a letter of my complaint to their PO. Box on their website tomorrow. I simply want my overages credited back since they were not properly explained to me, and reps omitted that there were even text message plans I could upgrade to when seeking solutions in resolving this issue.

Below is my email I sent in Nov.2007, followed by an email I sent a few days ago, followed by how Jason treated me this morning. This is how they treat their customers of 6-7 years! ___________________________

Written in Nov. 2007 and sent via email to Robert Dotson, CEO of T-Mobile Dear Mr.

Dotson:

Thank you for taking the time to address my concern. My name is Y.B. and I have been a customer since 2002, so I have been with T-Mobile for the past 6 years. The reason I love giving T-Mobile my business is for your high quality customer service. I trust T-Mobile, and I believe in this company because I feel it is one of the last few companies out there built on integrity.

Around July of this year, I got a Blackberry Pearl, excited to have the email features and web browsing capabilities. I added the unlimited web browsing and email for $19.99. I kept my 1500 minute plan and my 400 text messaging plan.

Then around Aug. I called because I was wondering if email transactions were being charged as a "text". The Customer Service Rep did clarify that I could browse the internet unlimited, and that applied to unlimited email, inbound and outbound, as well. This was noted in my customer activity and logged that I called in to ask that. Note: There was no mentioning of Yahoo Messenger whatsoever, we did not talk about Yahoo Messenger at all. It didn't come up in the conversation. I was not using Yahoo Messenger at this time from my phone, but I assumed that it was unlimited as well since it was internet based. Or so I thought. The reason I thought it would be unlimited was because when I get onto Yahoo Messenger at home, I have to "log on" onto my internet to connect. And with the phone, you have to "log on" also in order to connect.

Well guess what? :) I was all excited about my new unlimited plan and started Yahoo Messenging like crazy because I was all excited! I went over 700 text messages or something. When I went to pay the bill in Oct. and it said my bill was an unusually $100 higher. This was when I initially learned that a Yahoo Message was charged as a text message. I thought a text message was a text message, and that instant messaging was included with the unlimited internet plan along with the emails.

These were my exact words: "What are my options in resolving this text issue?" The rep was nice enough to show me how to use #674# send, where you get to keep track of your text messages, and she kept pushing for payment arrangements. She kept offering how I could settle the balance. So I walked away deciding that I won't use Yahoo Messenger anymore, since it was counted as a text, and that T-Mobile gave me a $30 credit or something for this unfortunate experience. So I just ate the cost and decided to move on.

Note: In asking what my "options" were relating to text messaging, the Customer Service Rep never mentioned to me that I could simply raise my plan to $9.99 for 1000 text messages. She never even gave me that option. So I didn't know that I could even raise my plan. And because she didn't mention it, I only worked with what options she did give me--which was to pay the bill.

Then a few weeks later, I called because I thought, "They have to have other rate plans! It's crazy that they don't?!" Please note that I took the initiative to call T-Mobile to find out what your plans are...noted in your call log. I asked, "What is your next plan up?" And the rep said, "It's 9.99 for 1000 text messages". I asked them to please change my plan to that.

So I thought I had addressed the issue of a) being a responsible customer and asking what my full options were in handling the text overage issue and learning what T-Mobile could offer as a solution, b) I had learned how to keep track of my text messages, and c) I took the initiative to call in and ask about your rate plans and raised my rate plan.

Great, so end of problem right? :) Well I was going through my mail yesterday and noticed an unusually high phone bill. So I called in again to make sure we were on track, and to find out what had happened. So because of all this confusion, I have been paying $100 in overages ever since I got the phone. And all I had to do was up my plan and spend an additional $4.99/ mo. instead of spending $300.

And unfortunately, it took a three month cycle to figure that out?

I spoke with a fantastic lady named Sherry (gave this lady a raise!) yesterday. She was understanding, a great listener, great energy, she was firm in her argument, but she knew I had a case. She did what she could, she was awesome! I asked to speak to her supervisor, and I spoke with Mr. J.R. ID # 1048569. He kept cutting me off, was polite but was a poor listener and we scheduled a phone call for someone to call me back regarding this issue within 24 hours. He also gave me your email in which I am writing today.

I also want to note that I didn't even know, again, what your promotions were until Ms. Sherry told me that I could even go up to unlimited text messaging for $14.99 until yesterday. None of the other previous reps had told me that either in the times that I've called in resolving this text overage issue.

Mr. Dotson, I feel really bitter, especially knowing that if someone had just told me, I could have saved a few hundred dollars in overages. I don't feel like I am blaming T-Mobile, in fact I accept responsibility for any assumptions that I have made that may have contributed this confusion, but i also would like T Mobile to accept responsibility in the 2-3 times that I have called to inquire about your services, products, and promotions, that the rates were not mentioned to me. That I had to take initiative in asking for your rates on numerous occasions, as if I had to chase after this information. Honestly Mr. Dotson, I just don't have to time to call back over and over to learn of your promotions.

As a customer that really believes in the integrity of your company, and with 6 years of a great relationship, I hope to continue doing business with you all. However, I wanted to write to you so that you are aware that this is what's happening at T-Mobile. That your customer service reps are not making promotions and rate plans clear nor accessible to your customers, based on my experience.

What can we do to continue this rewarding relationship? I just feel that to pay around $300 extra in overages when someone could have just told me to raise my plan for additional $4.99/mo or $14.99/mo would have been the most efficient solution.

Because the charges average about $300, and you all already gave me a credit of $30 or so, I would like to propose that we split the cost of this inconvenience. $150-30 = $120. I know you all have to make your profit, but I believe in good ethical business so we can continue to do business repeatedly, for many many years to come. I would be content with a $120 credit, and I pay the $150 in overages.

I accept responsibility in having the assumptions that I had after talking to your customer services reps. However, i do need T-Mobile to accept responsibility in not providing information about rates and promotions when asked by the customer, on several occasions. The first when I asked what my "options" were in dealing with this text issue in Oct., the second when I called back to specifically ask about rates, and the third yesterday when I learned that you all even offered a unlimited text plan.

I agree, it is wrong to assume things. But I asked Ms. Sherry if TMobile had a unlimited minute plan, and she noted "No".

So if I know TMobile doesn't offer a unlimited phone plan, why would I assume that you offered an unlimited text plan? Furthermore, if it isn't mentioned by your customer service rep when you ask what your options are, then isn't it common sense to assume that such plan doesn't exist?

Mr. Dotson, Thank you for your patience and your time in helping me with this matter. I truly love your company and enjoy working with you all, I trust your company, and I know that it is built on a playing field of honor and integrity, which is why you have the outstanding customer service that you do. However I need your help in dealing with this mishap, we have reached something that customer service protocol can't resolve.

Thank you again for your consideration. I look forward to your reply

Written email to Robert Dotson, CEO of T-Mobile 7/10/08 Hello Mr.

Dotson,

I wrote you last November concerning my issues with T-Mobile. and I have to admit, I am still bitter about it. Everytime I pay my bill, every time Tmobile customer reps tell me "We appreciate you being a loyal customer of 7 years," it just makes me cringe.

I know you may not remember me, but what happened was that I got a new blackberry phone and internet service a year ago. It was not explained to me that yahoo messenging would be counted as a text message. So I went happy yahoo messenging away. I was charged $300 in overages.

So here is why I am upset: 1. Yahoo messenger was not explained to me that it would be charged as text.

2. #674 was not explained to me until after I had the overages.

3. Options for me to raise my plan was not offered to me until after I went out of my way to call back twice to say, "Gee, don't you guys have an unlimited plan?" Can you tell me about your promotions? Tmobile reps did not tell me about promotions that could have saved me from paying overages.

4. A $30 credit was given to me, but I should have not accepted it because now you guys won't recoop me for the rest of the $270 or so because the case is closed.

5. Jason was not too friendly.

He just didn't seem sympathetic, talked like a robot, was dismissive, and when I asked what I could do to get out of the contract, his reply was "well there is a $200 fee, and your contract isn't up until June of 2009" Do you know how angry that makes a customer to hear that? Being locked into contract unwillingly?

I am still feeling bitter about this. I know I am just one little customer in the entire world, but you know what? I am sure this is a reoccurring problem you all, as a company, are facing. And a bunch of little customers all add up.

So while I know giving all us little people refunds isn't good for the company's numbers, does missing out on future business with all us little people help the company in the long run? Wouldn't it be awesome to have high retention of contract renewal from existing customers and expand to gain more market share in the industry?

I really believe in doing the right thing. Actions speak louder than words, and while I apologize deeply that when Jason from your department handled the situation last year and I wrote you a big "F*** you" because I myself was coming from a lower place, I would still like to think you are a man of conscience, responsibility, and ethics. Again, I am sorry, Mr. Dotson, that I told you to f*** off. But I was really mad with how this was handled. No response is still a response....and still leaves an lasting impression of you, and your company. I mean, who really wants their customers to tell them "f*** you"? That's a reflection of your business.....

It takes a man of great integrity, respect, and leadership to be a CEO of a company such as T-Mobile. It doesn't make sense for me to switch to Sprint after 7 years of happy service with TMobile. I've happily paid you $6000 over the last 6-7 years, and would like to continue to do that. But I gotta admit. The way this situation was handled, was not one of quality response. Being told "Hey we are sorry, I know How was I supposed to know that if I took this credit, that the dispute was closed?

Mr. Dotson, I thank you again for reviewing my case. I'd like to share a story with you about Nordstrom's. Maybe you'd even heard about it. This woman came into Nordstrom's demanding they refund her money on some tires she'd bought. Nordstrom actually refunded her the money? Now you know, and I know, that Nordstrom doesn't even sell tires. But the point is, that they knew the value of positive word of mouth. That they'd rather bring her up to a neutral point of customer satisfaction rather than keep her at a negative one. The incident made headlines and gave Nordstrom even more great press than they would have ever had in doing any advertising. Now I feel that my situation is reasonable. It's not like I'm coming to tmobile to try to get you to credit me for the George Foreman grill I bought. LOL I am merely trying to recoop my charges for customer service reps not providing me information about how your company charges things when I went out of my way to ask, on several occasions. All I can as a customer, Mr. Dotson, is to go to you, to ask about how TMobile does things. Now the information that I get, or the information that I don't get, and the quality of the information that I get about your promotions, how things are charged, is the responsibility of the company I believe.

The point I am making is, is it worth me leaving Tmobile when I really want to stay in the first place but this incident just makes me feel sooo bitter? Is it worth the $6000 to say the least that could be lost in future business based on the $300 that could be credited in the form of extra services? Is it worth the negative energy I associate with TMobile and I can't help but talk about my terrible negative experience with people I know when they mention TMobile? I read a great book recently that said, a lot of companies fail to research what their customers are saying about them. That they spend so much effort and time and resources in gaining new customers, that they fail to understand or look into why they are losing customers.

While I understand it would hurt the company to give refunds, how about credit for extra services to disgruntled customers to ensure customer retention even after their contract is up? While I understand you don't want to give customers refunds, because you would lose physical money, would it work to credit me for some extra services so I could stay with you for decades to come? For example, I pay about $95 a month for 1500 minutes free night and weekends, and unlimited text, unlimited internet and email. I would like to upgrade to unlimited minutes for $99 and keep the unlimited internet and email for $20. So I would be paying about an extra $25 per month. So, if this works for you, I would love to be able to upgrade to the unlimited minute plan for the next 11 months. Since I estimate about $300 in overages, and you all credited me $30, $300-$30 = $270. $270 / $25 is 10.8 months. This way, Mr. Dotson, you're not really losing actual money, I am satisfied, and you'll get to keep my contract from me, willingly for decades to come.

This is a win-win solution don't you think?

Mr. Dotson, I believe in your company. I like your company. I like all the great customer service reps I've spoken with over the years. Your company really does have great customer service, but when it comes down to the wire...and things need stepping up, I feel Tmobile has let a long-time customer down in this situation. I accept responsibility in choosing, what I believe, is the best cell phone company out there in the industry. I accept responsibility in contacting your customer service to find out information about your promotions, what my options are, etc. But that is really all I can do. What your customer service reps tell me, I believe. What they don't tell me, or fail to tell me, or omit to tell me, I have no control over.

But why must I be punished with these charges when I've done everything I can to learn about your services, procedures, charges, etc? And in fact, have gone out of my way to do so?

I have intentions of upgrading my plan to unlimited minutes and staying with TMobile indefinitely because I have faith in your company, Mr. Dotson. I really don't want to switch to Sprint. My contract expires in June of 2009. I believe TMobile is an amazing company. I am writing to not only seek a solution for my case, but to also possibly, help you brainstorm some solutions to problems similar to mine you all are facing as a company.

A copy of the email I sent in November is attached for your review of details of my case.

At the end of the day Mr Dotson.....there are two types of people: Those who come from a place of FEAR, EGO, and SCARCITY. and those who come from a place of LOVE, ABUNDANCE, and SPIRIT.

I truly am faithful, and respectful, that a great solution will be resolved between us. I truly again, have respect for you as a powerful man who leads a company of integrity, innovation, and commerce.

I heard a great quote once...."Yun, anyone can make money. Money is easy to make. It's how you make your money that counts".

I genuinely want to help you with your company in seeking solutions. To say, "Well you've accepted a $30 credit and there's nothing else we can do, the buck stops here" doesn't lead your customers that are locked in contract with you to feel good, nor say good things about you. From what I understand, TMobile is facing this problem and it's really costing you guys a lot, in some form. Instead of spending money on advertising and promotion in getting new contracts, what is TMobile doing to ensure retention of customers besides locking them in a bitter contract customers don't want to stay in? What is TMobile doing to make us want to stay besides this contract? Because when the contract ends, we leave because we remember how we were treated. Now doesn't it make sense to focus on your current customers in addition on focusing on getting new contracts also? Focus on both? They say you get 80% of your business from 20% of your customers. I'm sure these numbers work differently for your company since all of your customers are under contract. But the concept holds for the long term I'm sure...And while it makes sense that you all offer a competitive rate plan such as Sprint's in the unlimited minute arena, what is TMobile doing to have that edge to ensure that we stay with you for decades, Mr. Dotson? We are going on a decade of doing business together, and believe me, I would love to stay. But honestly, for me to stay at this point, would not make me feel good. I simply wouldn't feel good about myself. Everytime I pay that bill, I have negative feelings towards TMobile. And every time your customer service reps say thank you for being with us for 7 years, I cringe and think to myself, "Yeah right". And every time someone tells me they are thinking of switching to Tmobile, I feel obligated to tell them about my terrible experience.

Wouldn't it be awesome if your costumers wanted to renew their contract with you willingly as a way to keep retention rather than maintain retention by negatively locking them in? Customers will ultimately leave in the long run, and it will affect your market share. Because if it's not Tmobile, it's AT&T and Verizon.

Wouldn't the first scenario serve TMobile in the long run of things for decades for come?

I hope you have a great day, Mr. Dotson, I will follow up with an email soon to see what we can do about this situation. I understand that my case is closed, that my 60 days for dispute has long been up. But how are we supposed to know these things? My point is, I haven't left Tmobile yet, my contract isn't up until June 2009, and I would hope we can work something out so that I don't leave. Because Mr. Dotson, I don't wanna leave. I like Tmobile. Up until now, I was proud to be a Tmobile customer. I referred people to Tmobile.

Thanks again for your time.

If it helps, whenever I come across an adversity or challenge, I sit back and say, "How do you handle this coming from your higher self, with grace?" And the right answer always shows up.

I look forward to hearing from you directly, Mr. Dotson. Thank you again for your time. __________________________________________________

So the good news is, they called back pretty quick. The bad news is, I talked to the same dude, "Jason", that I spoke with before last year. My contract is up in June 2009, and after that it's month to month. So he offers his "offer"---to get me to upgrade my plan with no contract, basically if I upgraded to unlimited, it would be out of contract in June 2009 instead of July 2009.....ohhh how impressive. NOT. So basically I am out of contract for a one month period.

So when I asked, "Will you admit that T-Mobile didn't tell me that Yahoo Messenger was charged as a text until I was charged these overages? I decline your offer it's no different than if my contract had ended. "

He was a broken record: "These charges are valid. These charges are valid. I'm going to offer my offer one more time, if you choose not to accept that's the end of the conversation and I'm going to end the conversation".

So I asked again, "Will you admit that T-Mobile didn't tell me that it was charged as a text until after the fact I was charged these charges?"

Jason: "These charges are valid. We won't offer you a credit. You upgraded to unlimited text message this past May"

Me: "Right. T-Mobile didn't even tell me there was a unlimited text plan until after I went out of my way and called back twice to specificly ask, after the charges we charged. Your reps didn't even tell me this information in the first place. The only solution they offered was to teach me how to keep track of the messages, and pressured me to pay my bill! Well I want to talk to someone other than you, sir. I want to work with someone other than you. "

Jason:"I am the highest you can go. There is no one else to help you with this. We won't give you a credit because the charges are valid. This conversation is going to end. "

Me: "So explain your offer again...what is your offer exactly?"

Jason: "My offer is no longer on the table. You declined it. "

Me: "Are you serious? You're pulling your offer in the same phone conversation?"

Jason: "Yeah. You didn't want it so it's no longer available to you".

Me: "Are you serious?"

Y.b. Van Nuys, California
U.S.A.

Click here to read other Rip Off Reports on T-Mobil

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 07/11/2008 03:09 AM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/T-Mobile/Los-Angeles-California-91411/T-Mobile-Yahoo-Messenger-was-not-explained-itd-be-charged-as-text-thus-it-wasnt-unlimi-349972. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report.

Click Here to read other Ripoff Reports on T-Mobile

Search for additional reports

If you would like to see more Rip-off Reports on this company/individual, search here:

Search Tips
Report & Rebuttal
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Also a victim?
What's this?
Repair Your Reputation!
What's this?
REBUTTALS & REPLIES:
0Author 5Consumer 0Employee/Owner
Updates & Rebuttals

#1 Consumer Suggestion

That's not what you asked

AUTHOR: Qwerty777 - (U.S.A.)

"These were my exact words: 'What are my options in resolving this text issue?'"

You asked how to fix this current problem of getting rid of the charges--the salesperson answered the actual question that you asked. You didn't ask how to prevent those charges in the future or anything about avoiding the problem, you asked how to fix your ignorant mistake. I also think its wierd that no one would have mentioned text plans when you bought the phone, because I've never had a text plan on my phone, and neither has anyone in my family. Everytime any of us buys a phone, they harass us about getting a text plan. You must have something better to do than sending and receiving 700 texts in a month. Just don't drive in my neighborhood.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#2 Consumer Suggestion

That's not what you asked

AUTHOR: Qwerty777 - (U.S.A.)

"These were my exact words: 'What are my options in resolving this text issue?'"

You asked how to fix this current problem of getting rid of the charges--the salesperson answered the actual question that you asked. You didn't ask how to prevent those charges in the future or anything about avoiding the problem, you asked how to fix your ignorant mistake. I also think its wierd that no one would have mentioned text plans when you bought the phone, because I've never had a text plan on my phone, and neither has anyone in my family. Everytime any of us buys a phone, they harass us about getting a text plan. You must have something better to do than sending and receiving 700 texts in a month. Just don't drive in my neighborhood.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#3 Consumer Suggestion

That's not what you asked

AUTHOR: Qwerty777 - (U.S.A.)

"These were my exact words: 'What are my options in resolving this text issue?'"

You asked how to fix this current problem of getting rid of the charges--the salesperson answered the actual question that you asked. You didn't ask how to prevent those charges in the future or anything about avoiding the problem, you asked how to fix your ignorant mistake. I also think its wierd that no one would have mentioned text plans when you bought the phone, because I've never had a text plan on my phone, and neither has anyone in my family. Everytime any of us buys a phone, they harass us about getting a text plan. You must have something better to do than sending and receiving 700 texts in a month. Just don't drive in my neighborhood.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#4 Consumer Suggestion

That's not what you asked

AUTHOR: Qwerty777 - (U.S.A.)

"These were my exact words: 'What are my options in resolving this text issue?'"

You asked how to fix this current problem of getting rid of the charges--the salesperson answered the actual question that you asked. You didn't ask how to prevent those charges in the future or anything about avoiding the problem, you asked how to fix your ignorant mistake. I also think its wierd that no one would have mentioned text plans when you bought the phone, because I've never had a text plan on my phone, and neither has anyone in my family. Everytime any of us buys a phone, they harass us about getting a text plan. You must have something better to do than sending and receiving 700 texts in a month. Just don't drive in my neighborhood.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#5 Consumer Suggestion

When in doubt....make sure

AUTHOR: Dani - (U.S.A.)

"but I assumed that it was unlimited as well"

This line right here sums up everything you said. You should have called to make sure. There's a difference between messaging and emailing.
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Report & Rebuttal
Respond to this report!
What's this?
Also a victim?
What's this?
Repair Your Reputation!
What's this?

Advertisers above have met our
strict standards for business conduct.



Ripoff Report Legal Directory