• Report: #890002

Complaint Review: The Henry Group

  • Submitted: Tue, May 29, 2012
  • Updated: Sun, October 21, 2012

  • Reported By: Joe — New York United States of America
The Henry Group
690 8th Avenue Floor 5 New York City, NY 10036 New York, New York United States of America

The Henry Group Polaris Scam, door to door, marketing New York, New York

*General Comment: Scams

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Where to start? So as a 2011 graduate with my BA in Psychology, I figured I'd apply to some businesses and just hope for the best in this economy. Literally within a few days I was flooded with emails and voicemails for interviews and one was from The Henry Group. I showed up 15 minutes early for the interview, went inside and sat down. 45 minutes later I was finally called in. The woman interviewing me was of latina background and did not speak clear English. She talked a mile a minute and asked the most basic, vague questions. The entire interview lasted about 5 minutes and I was told I would get a call later in the day if I made it to the second round interviews. Sure enough, I got the call. I came back for the second interview and one of their "top sales guys" came inside and told me I would be going with him for the day. We hopped on the subway and headed up to a very shady area of Harlem on E 116th. [continued below]....
..... There were literally ghetto people fighting in the streets and it was clearly not the place you'd want to be. We went door to door knocking on every one up and down each floor.

To be blunt and realistic, this job is all about being an adult selling girl scout cookies, except you wear a suit and sell energy service or other products. 95% of the people say no if they even bother to answer their door in the first place. Some people slammed it on him, some cursed him out, and some invited us inside which was very creepy because the people were all shady as hell. By law you aren't allowed to go inside if invited because of the danger involved. That alone should be a red flag. The sales guy would constantly ask me the same questions throughout the day: "So why should you be hired?", "What kind of person do you think it takes to make it here?", etc. I thought the guy was half brain-dead, as I answered the same questions all day as if he didn't remember. I made it through the 5 hours of brutal door to door BS and we finally hopped on the subway back downtown to their office. On the way, he told me he liked me and thought I was a great candidate. He told me when I got back to the office I would be given a short test to take as the final stage and gave me the answers to some of them...he even told me I could write them down. This was very suspicious, but I let it all play out anyway. I met with the woman from the first interview again when I returned from Harlem and she told me the sales guy loved me and was very impressed so they wanted to hire me right then and there. After all the explanation in terms of pay and all that, she said, "Congratulations, we'd like to offer you the position! Come in tomorrow at...." and I cut her off. I thanked her, but cautioned that I would need a day to sleep on it and think it over. The second I suggested I needed even a day to think about it, she got nasty. "Well, you said you could start immediately...what is there to think about?" she said sternly. "If you need to think about it then fine, but we can hire another candidate in your place very quickly so..." and I just told her I'd get back to her. I never bothered to call back. This job is 100% scam and you can sense it if you have more than a few brain cells. You have to grow a pair and be straight forward and defend yourself against these business sharks...they will try every trick they have from intimidation, to false promises, to using other interviewers as leverage to force a fast decision, etc. 

In conclusion, if you get an interview for like 1-8PM, then it's a door to door scam. They tell you the success stories and try to come off as prestigious and slick, but you can see through them easily by the end of the day. There is NO base pay, NO benefits, and it's just a joke. I honestly don't know who would take a job like this...you have to be practically an olympic athlete to even be able to walk around and climb hundreds of stairs everyday for 5-7 hours. The Henry Group is a scam, and they try to win you over making it seem like they are very selective picking you out of a large pool, but the truth is anyone with a brain and a pair of legs is offered the job because it's slave work. Do not even bother with this place.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 05/29/2012 02:03 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/The-Henry-Group/New-York-New-York-/The-Henry-Group-Polaris-Scam-door-to-door-marketing-New-York-New-York-890002. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 General Comment

Scams

AUTHOR: shopaholic - (United States of America)

6 points for your career...

1. Don't pre-judge.  Some places seem like its too good to be true, maybe not everyone makes it big.  If it takes hard work, and offers free training, it may be good just to build a resume.  Give it a shot, don't pay money or sign a contract that you have to stay or sign up your friends.  In a skeptical society, you want to be careful, don't write off something that could be what you're looking for just because it says, "no experience necessary".  Ask questions, while you may need people skills, work ethic, and integrity, many companies will teach marketing or sales, etc.

2. Others Make a percentage of what would be yours.  Also called multi-level marketing or a pyramid.

3. You pay for training.  While many companies need you to be licensed to represent them.  Know the difference between paying to join, paying to be licensed, or being paid and learning.

4. Get rich quick without hard work, student mentality, & integrity.  If it requires nothing from you, it will return nothing.

5. Do they interview or train in person or over the phone.  While it may not be a scam.  If you're doing everything over the phone, they don't care enough about your success to meet you.

6. Use professional sources to learn about scams.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/worklife/07/15/cb.avoid.job.scams/

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Employment_scams#mw-mf-search

http://jobsearch.about.com/od/jobsearchscams/qt/scamexamples.

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/moneymatters/jobs-hunting-scams.shtml

http://www.rileyguide.com/scams.html
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