• Report: #38040

Complaint Review: Twin Cities Federal Bank (TCF)

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  • Submitted: Thu, December 12, 2002
  • Updated: Thu, January 29, 2009

  • Reported By:Bloomington Minnesota
Twin Cities Federal Bank (TCF)
801 Marquette Ave Minneapolis, Minnesota U.S.A.
  • Phone: 612-661-8092
  • Web:
  • Category: Banks

Twin Cities Federal Bank (TCF) deceptive company false promises Rip-off Minneapolis Minnesota

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

*Consumer Comment: Similar expirience

*Consumer Comment: Looks like you got hit by the Nigerian Check Scam

*Consumer Suggestion: Use PUPID to verify cashier's check

*Consumer Suggestion: Cashier's checks are NOT guaranteed funds

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We are selling a car (1961 Buick) and a man contacted us off of an ad we placed on the internet. He said that he was a car dealer and wanted to purchase it. He was from out of country and wanted an associate of his in the U.S. to send us a cashiers check for the amount of the car plus the amount for transportation of the car to him. Once the check cleared we would wire the amount for transportation.

We received a cashiers check and deposited into our savings account at Twin Cities Federal in Bloomington, MN (Southtown Center/Penn Ave Branch) on 10-08-02. While at the bank depositing the check, I asked when would the check clear and I would know that the funds were GOOD, they said 24 hours. I said to the teller, "Really, I thought that it took 10 days for a check to clear?" and he said "Not with a cashier's check". Since I wanted to be sure that I was being clear to him, I said "I need to know not just when the funds would show up in our account, but I need to know when we can be sure that it is a good check, that it has cleared, and that it is real money that we can touch and use.

I don't want to get a charge or have this come back and bite us in the butt" The teller laughed, and said "Tomorrow afternoon ma'am. No problems", I thanked him and left. Two days later, twice the time that I was told to wait to be sure that this was a good check and that it had cleared, I went back to TCF and after the teller told me it looked like the check had cleared I withdrew $7200 to be used for the transportation of the car and we wired it via Western Union.

On 10-16-02, TCF called and told us that the check was counterfeit and that they were deducting $8,800 from our saving account, even though they told us that the check would be clear in 24 hours. Our account was negative because of this and they said we were responsible. I told TCF at this is why I asked the specific question that I did; I wanted to have the right information. Why are WE responsible because THEIR employee gave me incorrect information? If the clerk had said that it would show up in my account in 24 hours, but we would not be totally sure that the check was good for 12 - 14 days

we would have told the guy in Africa that we would not be going forward with anything for 4 weeks. I trusted that they knew what they were talking about. Isn't that their job, to inform their customers and to help ensure our financial safety? The TCF bank manager told me too bad, and that if I was worried about the check clearing I should have been more careful. She said I should have called the Bank of America that the check was issued from to verify the account number and that the funds were in the account to cover the check.

I thought that is what TCF is supposed to do during the time that they tell you that you have to wait to be sure a check clears.

On 10-17-02, Renee with TCF Headquarters called. She was handling the return of counterfeit check. My husband asked her if we were to bring a cashier's check into a TCF Bank and deposit it, how long would it be until I would know it had cleared? Not just the funds have been transferred, but that the check is good, and there is real money that I can pull out of my account and use and not have to worry about the check bouncing? She thought it was 24 hours, but went to verify this with someone else. When she came back she said yes, 24 hours. Now we have two TCF employees telling us the 24 hours! We did that, we waited 48 hours, so what did we do wrong? And why are we being held accountable for TCF's not giving us the correct information?

We were told that this would not effect our checking account, but on 10-19-02 I got a notice from TCF that checks from our account had bounced! It turns out that on 10-17-02 all of the money from our checking account was transferred to our savings account to cover the negative balance, even though that same day Todd assured me that this would not happen. And there were service charges of over $90 being charged to us!

The manager finally admitted to us that a cashiers check could come back and the amount would be deducted from your account in 6 days, 6 weeks, or even 12 months after you deposit it. According to her, they have no way of telling. Had the teller been honest with me the day I made the deposit and told me this information we would have never preceded with the transaction.

I had to call Todd Olson, the regional manager, several times to find out if things were being resolved and what would happen next. He said that they were reviewing the information, including the bank lobby videotape and the police report and that they will know more in a few days. After a few days past, I called again. I was told by Todd that if I would have shown this much concern over the check at the time of deposit that TCF would have handled this different and could have checked the account to make sure it was safe.

He said that from viewing the tape it seemed like I was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check.

TCF has informed us that they would send our case to collections if we did not pay in full or set up a payment plan. So, in order to protect our perfect credit rating, we are currently paying $872 per month on the 18th of every month to TCF towards this negative account. These payments in no way are admission to fault or responsibility to the negative amount by us. We are only doing so because we are being forced to by TCF in order to protect our credit rating. On 12-06-02 I received a call from Brian Davis with Milenium Credit. It turns out that even though we are up to date on our payment plan with TCF, they still sent our case to collections even though we were assured that this would not happen.

Shawn
Bloomington, Minnesota
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 12/12/2002 12:11 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Twin-Cities-Federal-Bank-TCF/Minneapolis-Minnesota-55402/Twin-Cities-Federal-Bank-TCF-deceptive-company-false-promises-Rip-off-Minneapolis-Minnes-38040. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report.

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Updates & Rebuttals

#1 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
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#2 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#3 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
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#4 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#5 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#6 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#7 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#8 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#9 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
Respond to this report!
What's this?

#10 Consumer Comment

Other rebuttals: you missed one of Shawn's points

AUTHOR: Bruce - (U.S.A.)

Okay, so cashiers checks are not gold and TCF Bank avoids responsibility.

Shawn made payment arrangements, made payments on time, yet TCF Bank still put Shawn in collections and hurt Shawn's credit report. Why?

Then regional manager Todd Olson said (Quoting from Shawn) that from viewing the tape it seemed like I (Shawn) was paying more attention to my daughter, who by the way is two years old, than I was to the transaction with the check. Hey Todd, is that as professional as you can get? Todd sounds like a whiney kid, and appears to be using every excuse to stick it to Shawn.

Yes, there are cons out the and Shawn should be careful. Shawn asked every reasonable question that Shawn knew to ask, and TCF answered Shawn's questions with the assumption that nothing could possibly go wrong with a cashiers check. Renee at TCF HQ said that the check was good and the funds were transferred. It seems that not all the cons, liars and thieves are in Africa.

Why not call the Department of the Treasury, a House or Senate (Federal) Banking Committee, or even the Secret Service (they are part of Treasury) or the FBI? The business of a bank is money, and in complex international transactions banks are supposed to know what is happening and when. So when Renee, who would be considered an "expert" or at least a "professional" in banking, says that the cashiers check was good and that the funds were transferred, why would Shawn have to believe otherwise?

Renee was evidently mistaken. The law states that when an employee makes a mistake on the job that the liability is that of the employer. So TCF was mistaken. TCF was wrong, and TCF gave bad counsel to Shawn in an area where TCF is supposed to have expertise.

If this were a medical instance, this would be malpractice. Bad (incomplete) advice, bad information, the client gets hurt and the professional slithers away from responsibility. You should have been paying as much attention to the check as you did to your daughter? Nice one, Todd. TCF seems to be quite wanting in professionalism.

There are federal banking laws and it seems that TCF did not do their job of protecting Shawn properly, and they even went against Shawn by calling the collectors inappropriately. Shawn, hit them with every Fed that you can, and I hope that they can be legally found as irresponsible, and breachers of contract (verbal agreements are still contracts). Banks are not invincible. TCF make serious mistakes and should be made to pay for them.
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#11 Consumer Comment

Similar expirience

AUTHOR: Jeremy - (U.S.A.)

I was selling an selling some antiqes after a close friend died and was dooped into the same routine. No matter what Washington Mutual would not budge. Although I made it clear that I was willing to procecute the person responsible for the fraud they would not let me have even one months rent out of my accounts. Totally frozen, panicing about how to make rent I recieved nothing but contradictory comments from washington mutuals telephone and branch reps. Half the people on the phone would say that they may honor my fraud claim or not send me to collections while they later rejected my fraud claim and sent me to collections with frozen accounts leaving me homless and thereafter squatting on a friends couch before i could get back on my feet working and going to school again. I can see how from the customer service middle-management perspective that this could boil down to "branch juristiction" or how long you have had an active account but how could a bank that prides itself on customer service keep refusing and redirecting customers when you are always getting different opinions and and "answers" from tellers.
What I would really like to see come out of this would be some kind of legistlation involving cashiers checks and/or maybe some sort of class action law suit being taken to prevent this from happening anymore. And most importantly find these people...I emailed the FBI the time that the money was picked up from Western Union but is anything being done about it...how should I know?

And one last thing I have come to wonder is that now i am being contacted by a government grant agency and believe that they are attempting to pull another scam on my. So if you become a victim of one scam its like they get your information and continue to solicite you, what can I do to stop them? who can help...p.s. I have another fraud bio listed under Frank M which includes more info about the situation I was in this last summer 2004.
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#12 Consumer Comment

Looks like you got hit by the Nigerian Check Scam

AUTHOR: Shivonne - (U.S.A.)

I too had someone sending a check for a car I had for sale on th internet. I was concerned in the first place as to why someone in another country would want to buy my car. When I found out from FedEx that the check was coming from Nigeria, I was even more concerned. When I took it to my bank and asked them about all of it, lucky they knew of the scam. But unfortunately it has affected many people such as yourself and many banks such as TCF. What I was told is that in most cases the funds have cleared in 24 to 48 hours, but there is a glitch in the banking system nationwide with casheir's checks where it can take a while to figure out if it is fraud. So these criminals have found a way to work through that glitch and rip off people. Now how is this one bank or individual teller's fault. What you should really be gearing your anger twards is these horrible people who are running the scam, not your bank!
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#13 Consumer Suggestion

Use PUPID to verify cashier's check

AUTHOR: Kevin - (U.S.A.)

When I had a similar car buyer scam, I contacted my Wells Fargo bank, they suggested I email the buyer a PUPID acc't number which your bank will set up. This is a Pick-Up Personal ID account the Bank sets up for processing a wire-transfer. Then, I told the Buyer to wire only the car purchase price to my PUPID acct # c/o Bank's address (in SF, Calif in Wells Fargo case), and to set up the same PUPID-type of wire-transfer with his Shipping Agent. Although this took several emails back-and-forth to arrive at this approach, this ended it: I never heard from this Buyer again, proving it was a scam (of course).
This method (if it's a real Buyer), also keeps secret your own bank account numbers, no cashier's check is necessary, it "filters" any payment through the intermediate PUPID account; your bank might call it by a different name.
Don't thank me, thank my Banker, Sandy, at Wells Fargo-Bloomington, for coming up with this approach.
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#14 Consumer Suggestion

Cashier's checks are NOT guaranteed funds

AUTHOR: Kelly - (U.S.A.)

Prior to common knowledge cashiers checks are no longer guaranteed funds. They're just too easy to counterfeit. Unfortunately you have been duped by a very popular scam. Counterfeiters from Africa buy property with a counterfeit check. In fact, I am a bank teller at a large bank in Michigan. I deposited such a check for a customer, before this scam was uncovered. His story was similar to yours. He was selling a motorcycle, shipped the bike upon receiving the check rather than waiting for it to clear. He never saw a penny from the check. The teller was right. A cashier's check generally clears in 24 hours, and until then there's no way for a bank other than the issuer of the check to know if the funds are good. As far as him telling you the check had cleared, that depends on their computer system, which I am unfamiliar with. Also, when someone deposits/cashes a bad check it's that person's responsibility. It sucks. But they have every right to take money back from you. In the future, don't trust checks, official, personal, money orders, nothing. Get cash, or have the money wired to your account where it will clear immediately. I'm very sorry to hear about your unfortunate luck.
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