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  • Report: #286876

Complaint Review: Walgreens Pharmacy

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  • Submitted: Mon, November 26, 2007
  • Updated: Tue, May 11, 2010

  • Reported By:Apache Junction Arizona
Walgreens Pharmacy
55 W. Apache Trail Apache Junction, Arizona U.S.A.

Walgreens Pharmacy WALGREENS PHARMACISTS CLAIM TO BE DOCTORS, LIMIT MEDS, WON'T GIVE COMPLETE PRESCRIPTION, EVEN THOUGH DOCTOR PRESCRIBED IT. Apache Junction Arizona

*Consumer Comment: Never Go To Walgreens

*Consumer Comment: Quantity limit

*Consumer Comment: Walgreen pharmacist/controlled substances

*General Comment: wow

*Consumer Comment: Me Too!

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: No sympathy here

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: To clear this up.

*Consumer Comment: On drugs?

*Consumer Comment: this is from the US department of LAbor

*Consumer Comment: I take hydrocodone with tylenol

*Consumer Suggestion: Ignorance is the problem.....

*Consumer Suggestion: Ignorance is the problem.....

*Consumer Suggestion: Ignorance is the problem.....

*Consumer Suggestion: Ignorance is the problem.....

*UPDATE Employee: BAD INFORMATION

*Consumer Comment: Addiction VS Dependence

*Consumer Comment: Addiction VS Dependence

*Consumer Comment: Addiction VS Dependence

*Consumer Suggestion: What pain med's do you take

*Consumer Suggestion: What pain med's do you take

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Good Lord, if It's such a Problem, CALL YOUR DOCTOR!

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: Pharmacist are DOCTORS.

*Consumer Suggestion: Health Professional? As what?

*Consumer Comment: Hey Bart I'm a Sap?

*Consumer Comment: If you want positive feedback then

*Consumer Comment: Tylenol amounts

*Consumer Comment: No one really said you are a drug addict.

*Author of original report: THANK YOU Imalawyr.

*Consumer Comment: Different states have different laws.

*Consumer Comment: You are WRONG people

*Consumer Comment: You are WRONG people

*Consumer Comment: You are WRONG people

*Consumer Comment: You are WRONG people

*Consumer Comment: I agree with the responders

*Consumer Comment: Stupid & Ignorant?

*Consumer Comment: Stupid & Ignorant?

*Consumer Comment: Stupid & Ignorant?

*Consumer Comment: Patricia

*Author of original report: THIS DOES NOT MAKE THE PHARMICIST A DOCTOR

*Consumer Suggestion: Some things to think about...

*Consumer Comment: A Pharmacist is a Doctor

*Consumer Comment: Wow-you really are jonesing

*Author of original report: THIS KIND OF IGNORANCE IS THE PROBLEM

*Consumer Comment: Anyone with a Doctorate Degree is a doctor.

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The Walgreens in Apache Junction, AZ, over years of going there, cuts pain meds and when I told them, 'you are not a doctor, my doctor wrote my prescription. It's your job to fill it.' Pharmacist said, 'I am a doctor'. When I argued with them about this, they called the police and told me never to come back to "his" pharmacy again.
I have six prescriptions filled every month (for years), Walgreens has done this consistitly, all the time, they said it was against federal laws, etc., etc. all bullcrap. I've gotten the same thing for years.
They also do this with several other people who take pain meds. I wonder what they do with the pills that they keep??? They are always very nice until you refuse to give them half your meds........then they don't want you in the store.
This is the same pharmacist that does this, and I have no problems until he gets involved.

Patty
Apache Junction, Arizona
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 11/26/2007 03:45 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Walgreens-Pharmacy/Apache-Junction-Arizona-85219/Walgreens-Pharmacy-WALGREENS-PHARMACISTS-CLAIM-TO-BE-DOCTORS-LIMIT-MEDS-WONT-GIVE-COMPL-286876. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Consumer Comment

Never Go To Walgreens

AUTHOR: justiceprevails - ()

I fell and had a very bad accident.  Broken nose that gave me two lovely black eyes.  A split lip and a broken foot.  torn ligaments in my left arm making it impossible to get dressed.  Severe chest internal bleeding and several bruised ribs.  I had a black/purple bruise the size of Texas on my chest.  Sleeping or lying on my back was impossible.

I went to an urgent care and was given xrays and Vicodin.  He said if I get worse come back there or go to the ER.

 I got very dizzy while walking through a store and had to go to the ER because it was a Sunday.  My blood pressure was 190 over 119.  Extremely high.  they gave me meds to bring it back down and said this was most likely due to severe pain.

When I finally left, four hours later, my BP was still high...152/108.  the ER doc gave me 20 Ultram.  My mother had to go fill it for me and the pharmacist at Walgreens said no Im not filling it cos this person already has pain meds at home.

EXCUSE ME?  the ER told me these two work well together and thats why he gave it to  me.  I also found out Ultram is NOT a controlled substance and I am not "flagged" as it were in any pharmacy and never have been.

The pharmacist tore up the Dr.'s script.  I just got done filing a complaint against him with the Pharmacy Board.  He'll get an earful. Pharmacists are NOT doctors and cannot play doctor when a patient brings a hard copy prescription into their pharmacy. this guy broke a few laws.  After getting off the phone with the board later on, I was told he'll be written up for this.  Just go to (((competitor's name redacted))) (Theyre the best)

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#2 Consumer Comment

Quantity limit

AUTHOR: I am the law - (USA)

It sounds to me like there is a quantity limit of some sort on the drug. In that case, the pharmacy will only dispense up to that legal limit despite what's on the script. 

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#3 Consumer Comment

Walgreen pharmacist/controlled substances

AUTHOR: Ozymandias - (United States of America)

I am a masters prepared health care professional of 35 years and can attest to some of the problems people have been increasingly reporting about pharmacists in various locations.  I too have run into a number of problem issues with pharmacies and primarily when they had no idea I was a healthcare professional and knew the standards of their practice act.  A pharmacist has a very clear practice act from the state in which he or she is licensed.  If they have a problem issuing a medication as prescribed, they have several options based on whatever problem they perceive...in this case a pharmacist appears to have implied he or she was a medical doctor...that is a fraudulent claim...the individual may have a doctorate in pharmacy but it is not a medical degree nor does it confer upon the individual any license to make any medical decisions in place of the patients' regular physician...another words the pharmacist cannot substitute their opinion and alter the dispensation of the drug without consulting the physician...they serve in an advisory position to the physician, but the physician is the individual who must write the prescription or write any adjustments to the prescription.  This issue first became a huge problem with the "morning after pill" because some pharmacists felt it was contrary to their theological beliefs to fill such a prescription...most states permit the individual to opt out as long as there is either another pharmacist on duty to fill the prescription or alternatively that there is another pharmacy available to fill the prescription...each state can set their own standards in relation to this.  Other than that, a pharmacist cannot legally tamper with the controlled substance prescription...any changes must be written by the doctor, and the prescribed amount is to be dispensed as written unless there is not enough of the medication on hand and a partial prescription is filled but the remainder clearly documented as owing to the patient as soon as the new supply arrives in the pharmacy (this can be tracked precisely because of the rigid documentation of controlled substances)...but the pharmacist may not substitute their own values on the dispensation of the medication amounts and must contact the physician to discuss his or her concerns.  The patient can file a complaint with the local pharmacy board, the state professional licensure board, and may even file a civil suit against the pharmacist...if the business has a policy permitting the pharmacist to do this, then the business can also be sued...if they do not have such a policy in existence then only the pharmacist can be sued.  The pharmacist can be subject to sanction, temporary suspension of his or her license to practice, or can lose his or her license altogether.  The issue is more severe when controlled substances are involved.  Any discrepancy in a controlled substance should be immediately brought to the attention of the pharmacy and the managing pharmacist notified at once or as soon as possible...the patient should record the names of all witnesses present  at the time of the incident and the events. That being said...one of the prime directives of the pharmacist is that he or she ensure all drugs dispensed are done so safely and in accordance with the proper dosage, route,  and time constraints...in the event the prescription does not fully spell out such information or if the information is not in compliance with the usual dose, route, or timing in keeping with that drug, then they need to contact the physician and validate the order.  In the case of long term use of a med and concerns related to that issue...they should not withhold the drug but should contact the physician to alert the physician to the issues.  When pharmacists seem to have crossed the line you must, as the consumer, be prepared to be calm, polite, and request complete validation of the issues...and prepared to follow through if you are not given a logical answer and assistance to resolve the problem.  If you are receiving a controlled substance, immediately check the amount and validate it is correct...do not leave the pharmacy until you have done so, remain in line of sight with the staff...if there is a discrepancy you must be able to demonstrate you have not left the area..you can also insist the police be called...again...do not leave the pharmacy area and be prepared to permit the police to search you and your belongings to verify you did not pocket any of the prescription. This is very important because there are many people who do try to pull controlled substance scams on the pharmacy and pharmacist so fair or not, the suspicion will almost always be cast upon the patient filling the prescription.   The police may not be able to resolve the situation at that moment but you will have a police report and witness reports to verify your complaint and your faultlessness.  This is a serious issue, particularly when it involves controlled substances.  The penalties can involve incarceration and fines, as well as professional sanctions.  The investigation may involve the Federal authorities and also may involve lie detector tests...do not start this process unless you are prepared to follow through or you will cast suspicion upon yourself if you drop the matter part way through the complaint process.  Do switch to another pharmacy and do not return to this pharmacy for any of your medication needs.  You should also refrain from "spreading the word" as you could end up being sued for slander or libel depending upon whether you did this verbally or in writing.  While there are people who will need to be on controlled substances the rest of their lives, it is still an issue about which many people have strongly based opinions and values which do not follow current pain management standards (treat the pain and believe the patient)...personally held concepts will sometimes result in very negative behaviors by those filling the prescriptions...not because of safety but because of their own misinformation and values systems.  It may also be an opportunity for you to re-examine your own use of pain meds to ensure you are on the right meds, dose, and have a continuing therapeutic need which cannot be met with any other meds or modalities of treatment.    
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#4 General Comment

wow

AUTHOR: erin - (United States of America)

I know this was a long time ago and I don't know if anyone is even still reading this, but I just had to say something.  Patty how dense can you possibly be??  You talk about others' lack of common sense yet this has been explained to you time and time again and you STILL don't get it!?!? 

The pharmacist was just looking out for your/his/Walgreen's best interests.  Sounds like a great employee to me.  If you don't agree with this, then what do you imagine his motivation was in holding back half of your prescription? Just to piss you off? Doubt it.  To make himself or the pharmacy less money?  Doubt it. 

And if you had the police called on you to assist in getting you to leave a retail store AND the district manager sided with him, AND the police sided with him, AND everyone here agrees with him, even though he isn't even here to tell his side of the story, then it's looking like you are the ignorant one. 

I have worked in a retail location for 5 years and have NEVER had to involve the police with a customer, though I have had some pretty angry lunatics in here.  That just goes to show how rediculous you were being.  It is people like YOU that make wonderful employees (who actually follow rules and laws) hate their jobs some days!!! 

Oh and by the way, a pharmacist IS a doctor.  Try leaving your trailor once in a while and visiting a library to get some reading in, and maybe you would gain some of this common knowledge.  It might just help you with your spelling and grammar too!

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#5 Consumer Comment

Me Too!

AUTHOR: 1hotlilmama - (U.S.A.)

I must say I have enjoyed reading this post and all the those responding to it! I have had my pain meds filled at Walgreens for 6 years nd have offten had the Pharm. tell me they have to call the doctor to verify they gave it tome, or that I still need as many as was on the refill pad. they d this about every three months.
I'm 27 years old and while my husband baby boy and I were driving hom from dinner one night we were hit by a drunk driver. I was thrown into the side of the car (I had my seat belt on) and have since had the mot horrable pain in my back as well as lost function of my left arm.
I don't mind the pharm. checking on my meds at all. I know this way I'm less likely to get home with the wrong thing or more than I need. I don't consider myself addicted to my meds. I do have to take some of them to function, but if I don't take them I'm not killing people to get them. I'm just hurting all day. :) I do have phis. therepy two times a week and not all are for pain. Some are for swelling and others for pain.

I would be upset if they told me they didn't think I needed them and wouldn't fill them. That would upset me. If I go see a doctor and he checks my blood and looks at my back and does all the scans I don't see how a man behind a counter who knows nothing about me knows if I need the meds or not.

If you don't like they way they fill your pills, why don't you go somwhere else or have them filled through a mail in service? I have done that befre and it works really great! You even get a discount for having three months filled at once.

I hope some of this helps!
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#6 UPDATE EX-employee responds

No sympathy here

AUTHOR: Midwest Pharmd. - (U.S.A.)

Patty,
I only have a few brief things to say.

First, Pharmacists are Doctors. Look it up.

Second, While I realize you have come to this site in an attempt to have your problem heard, it does you no benefit to insult the people who disagree with you. In doing so you have only weakened your credibility, sending the message to everyone in here that when you do not get your way you revert to childlike behaviour. Congratulations, I don't believe a word in your original complaint. Little baby probably didn't get what she wanted and threw a hissy fit.

Finally, Can I just say that I am glad that you do not patronize my pharmacy, you just seem like someone who is an awful and ignorant human being. I pity you.
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#7 UPDATE EX-employee responds

To clear this up.

AUTHOR: Fathergod - (U.S.A.)

A Pharmacist does actually hold a PharmD license which is actually a doctorate so he is in fact telling the truth about being a doctor to somewhat a degree. However, your complaint seems to be about certain pain medications that you take. Depending on what the medications are, some are very controlled by the state and federal laws. Medications such as Adderall, oxycontin, fentanyl are considered Class II medications that can only be dispensed within a certain time frame with no refills allowed. Such as, getting a prescription for 10 days worth of oxycontin and then coming back with a new prescription before the 10 days are over. By law, the pharmacy can not fill that prescription even if the doctor prescribed it.

Without knowing more about your situation, I can not advise you more except to click on the Contact link on the Walgreens website and then click on the customer service link. The information you write, will be read by corporate management and by the store management.
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#8 Consumer Comment

On drugs?

AUTHOR: Sarah - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

You said "I think you're all high and on drugs. I must be the only one (besides imalawyer) here that's NOT a drug addict.

I've never heard of such uninformed idiots. Pharmacists are doctors? UNTRUE! You're all high and on drugs. Next time you get your information, do it when you're not on drugs."

Your original post and subsequent responses are erratic sounding and full of grammatical errors and misspellings. However, you accuse other people with well-organized, gramatically correct and seemingly well thought-out responses of being ignorant. I am on a medication that I am physically dependent on. When I'm off of it for too long, I get shaky, nervous and extremely light-headed. Does that mean that I'm addicted? No. Does it mean I'm dependent? Yes. Does my pharmacist have a right to deny me my medications? Yes. There are laws that govern what a pharmacist can dispense. When I was in college, my doctor prescribed a cough syrup with codene. I had to provide a photo ID at the pharmacy before I could get the prescription filled.

Many people that have chronic pain have suicidal tendencies. I'm not saying that you do and I'm not saying that your pharmacist thinks so, but I'm pretty willing to bet that he's careful of that with the people that come in for prescriptions. How do you think he'd feel if someone with chronic pain committed suicide using medications (even prescribed ones) the he dispensed.

As far as the ignorant people that say that pharmacists are "doctors," they are right. My professors in college were "doctors," and I called them Dr. xxxx because that is their title. Your (very ignorant) objection is that a pharmacist is not a physician. These pharmacists go through a lot of schooling and deserve the respect that comes with the title "Doctor."

So, either get a second opinion from your doctor or another doctor, find another pharmacist that will fulfill your every whim for pain medication or something, but quit calling people that are obviously educated ignorant, stupid, etc.
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#9 Consumer Comment

this is from the US department of LAbor

AUTHOR: Nancy - (U.S.A.)

A license is required in all States, the District of Columbia, and all U.S. territories. In order to obtain a license, pharmacists must earn a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree from a college of pharmacy and pass several examinations.

Education and training. Pharmacists must earn a Pharm.D. degree from an accredited college or school of pharmacy. The Pharm.D. degree has replaced the Bachelor of Pharmacy degree, which is no longer being awarded. To be admitted to a Pharm.D. program, an applicant must have completed at least 2 years of postsecondary study, although most applicants have completed 3 or more years. Other entry requirements usually include courses in mathematics and natural sciences, such as chemistry, biology, and physics, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences. In 2007, 92 colleges and schools of pharmacy were accredited to confer degrees by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). About 70 percent of Pharm.D. programs require applicants to take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT).

Courses offered at colleges of pharmacy are designed to teach students about all aspects of drug therapy. In addition, students learn how to communicate with patients and other health care providers about drug information and patient care. Students also learn professional ethics, concepts of public health, and medication distribution systems management. In addition to receiving classroom instruction, students in Pharm.D. programs spend about one-forth of their time in a variety of pharmacy practice settings under the supervision of licensed pharmacists.

In the 2006 07 academic year, 70 colleges of pharmacy also awarded the master-of-science degree or the Ph.D. degree. Both degrees are awarded after the completion of a Pharm.D. degree and are designed for those who want additional clinical, laboratory, and research experience. Areas of graduate study include pharmaceutics and pharmaceutical chemistry (physical and chemical properties of drugs and dosage forms), pharmacology (effects of drugs on the body), and pharmacy administration. Many master's and Ph.D. degree holders go on to do research for a drug company or teach at a university.

Other options for pharmacy graduates who are interested in further training include 1-year or 2-year residency programs or fellowships. Pharmacy residencies are postgraduate training programs in pharmacy practice and usually require the completion of a research project. These programs are often mandatory for pharmacists who wish to work in hospitals. Pharmacy fellowships are highly individualized programs that are designed to prepare participants to work in a specialized area of pharmacy, such clinical practice or research laboratories. Some pharmacists who own their own pharmacy obtain a master's degree in business administration (MBA). Others may obtain a degree in public administration or public health.

Licensure. A license to practice pharmacy is required in all States, the District of Columbia, and all U.S. territories. To obtain a license, a prospective pharmacist must graduate from a college of pharmacy that is accredited by the ACPE and pass a series of examinations. All States, U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia require the North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX), which tests pharmacy skills and knowledge. Forty-four States and the District of Columbia also require the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE), which tests pharmacy law. Both exams are administered by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP). Each of the eight States and territories that do not require the MJPE has its own pharmacy law exam. In addition to the NAPLEX and MPJE, some States and territories require additional exams that are unique to their jurisdiction.

All jurisdictions except California currently grant license transfers to qualified pharmacists who already are licensed by another jurisdiction. Many pharmacists are licensed to practice in more than one jurisdiction. Most jurisdictions require continuing education for license renewal. Persons interested in a career as a pharmacist should check with individual jurisdiction boards of pharmacy for details on license renewal requirements and license transfer procedures.

Graduates of foreign pharmacy schools may also qualify for licensure in some U.S. States and territories. These individuals must apply for certification from the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Examination Committee (FPGEC). Once certified, they must pass the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Examination (FPGEE), Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam, and Test of Spoken English (TSE) exam. They then must pass all of the exams required by the licensing jurisdiction, such as the NAPLEX and MJPE. Applicants who graduated from programs accredited by the Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) between 1993 and 2004 are exempt from FPGEC certification and examination requirements.

Other qualifications. Prospective pharmacists should have scientific aptitude, good interpersonal skills, and a desire to help others. They also must be conscientious and pay close attention to detail, because the decisions they make affect human lives.

Advancement. In community pharmacies, pharmacists usually begin at the staff level. Pharmacists in chain drugstores may be promoted to pharmacy supervisor or manager at the store level, then to manager at the district or regional level, and later to an executive position within the chain's headquarters. Hospital pharmacists may advance to supervisory or administrative positions. After they gain experience and secure the necessary capital, some pharmacists become owners or part owners of independent pharmacies. Pharmacists in the pharmaceutical industry may advance in marketing, sales, research, quality control, production, or other areas.
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#10 Consumer Comment

I take hydrocodone with tylenol

AUTHOR: Nancy - (U.S.A.)

Patty
I have severe pain in my knees and some days I can not move. I do have the vicodin but I only thake them when it si really bad. My pharmacy gives me 30 at a time to alst about 10 days but I make them last a month so they have no problem refilling my prescription. YOu don not NEED the pain pills I do not NEED the pain pills. I take 8 pills a day twice a day none of which are pain pills. I NEED those to stay alive. SO there is a difference between NEED and WANT
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#11 Consumer Suggestion

Ignorance is the problem.....

AUTHOR: Drugmanrx - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

While I wasn't there to witness the altercation you had with the pharmacist, I am pretty sure I know whose side I am on. The pharmacist has the legal right to decide whether or not to fill your prescription. Most likely, I am willing to bet you were trying to fill your prescription too early. Even if the prescribing doctor "OK'd" it doesn't mean the pharmacist is required by law to fill it. (ie if you were "doctor hopping" the prescribing doctor may not know you already got some from someone else) Pharmacists that have graduated recently are considered "doctors" as they have a Doctorate of Pharmacy from the university they attended. I don't think I will call myself a "doctor" when I graduate as most of the public doesn't understand you can be a "doctor" without being a physician.
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#12 Consumer Suggestion

Ignorance is the problem.....

AUTHOR: Drugmanrx - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

While I wasn't there to witness the altercation you had with the pharmacist, I am pretty sure I know whose side I am on. The pharmacist has the legal right to decide whether or not to fill your prescription. Most likely, I am willing to bet you were trying to fill your prescription too early. Even if the prescribing doctor "OK'd" it doesn't mean the pharmacist is required by law to fill it. (ie if you were "doctor hopping" the prescribing doctor may not know you already got some from someone else) Pharmacists that have graduated recently are considered "doctors" as they have a Doctorate of Pharmacy from the university they attended. I don't think I will call myself a "doctor" when I graduate as most of the public doesn't understand you can be a "doctor" without being a physician.
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#13 Consumer Suggestion

Ignorance is the problem.....

AUTHOR: Drugmanrx - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

While I wasn't there to witness the altercation you had with the pharmacist, I am pretty sure I know whose side I am on. The pharmacist has the legal right to decide whether or not to fill your prescription. Most likely, I am willing to bet you were trying to fill your prescription too early. Even if the prescribing doctor "OK'd" it doesn't mean the pharmacist is required by law to fill it. (ie if you were "doctor hopping" the prescribing doctor may not know you already got some from someone else) Pharmacists that have graduated recently are considered "doctors" as they have a Doctorate of Pharmacy from the university they attended. I don't think I will call myself a "doctor" when I graduate as most of the public doesn't understand you can be a "doctor" without being a physician.
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#14 Consumer Suggestion

Ignorance is the problem.....

AUTHOR: Drugmanrx - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

While I wasn't there to witness the altercation you had with the pharmacist, I am pretty sure I know whose side I am on. The pharmacist has the legal right to decide whether or not to fill your prescription. Most likely, I am willing to bet you were trying to fill your prescription too early. Even if the prescribing doctor "OK'd" it doesn't mean the pharmacist is required by law to fill it. (ie if you were "doctor hopping" the prescribing doctor may not know you already got some from someone else) Pharmacists that have graduated recently are considered "doctors" as they have a Doctorate of Pharmacy from the university they attended. I don't think I will call myself a "doctor" when I graduate as most of the public doesn't understand you can be a "doctor" without being a physician.
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#15 UPDATE Employee

BAD INFORMATION

AUTHOR: Patricia Offenberg - (U.S.A.)

I think you're all high and on drugs. I must be the only one (besides imalawyer) here that's NOT a drug addict.

I've never heard of such uninformed idiots. Pharmacists are doctors? UNTRUE! You're all high and on drugs. Next time you get your information, do it when you're not on drugs.
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#16 Consumer Comment

Addiction VS Dependence

AUTHOR: Heidi - (U.S.A.)

Ok I will state this again...

This is from Harvard Medical School

Altlhough neuroadaptation (i.e., tolerance and withdrawal) can result from a variety of repetitive behaviors, neuroadaption is not the same as addiction. If neuroadaptation and its common manifestation of physical dependence were the same as addiction, then it would be incorrect to consider pathological gambling as an addictive behavior. It would be inaccurate to talk about sex and love addicts. *****Many people who use narcotics as post-operative pain medications never display addictive behavior even though they have became dependent physically on these psychoactive substances.******

Addiction almost always has physical dependence however physical dependence does not mean addiction. Addiction is the PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED for the drug the NEED for the feeling the NEED for the high. Physical dependence is the withdrawl the chemical PHYSICAL changes. Addiction is a psych disorder and physical dependence is a medical disorder.
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#17 Consumer Comment

Addiction VS Dependence

AUTHOR: Heidi - (U.S.A.)

Ok I will state this again...

This is from Harvard Medical School

Altlhough neuroadaptation (i.e., tolerance and withdrawal) can result from a variety of repetitive behaviors, neuroadaption is not the same as addiction. If neuroadaptation and its common manifestation of physical dependence were the same as addiction, then it would be incorrect to consider pathological gambling as an addictive behavior. It would be inaccurate to talk about sex and love addicts. *****Many people who use narcotics as post-operative pain medications never display addictive behavior even though they have became dependent physically on these psychoactive substances.******

Addiction almost always has physical dependence however physical dependence does not mean addiction. Addiction is the PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED for the drug the NEED for the feeling the NEED for the high. Physical dependence is the withdrawl the chemical PHYSICAL changes. Addiction is a psych disorder and physical dependence is a medical disorder.
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#18 Consumer Comment

Addiction VS Dependence

AUTHOR: Heidi - (U.S.A.)

Ok I will state this again...

This is from Harvard Medical School

Altlhough neuroadaptation (i.e., tolerance and withdrawal) can result from a variety of repetitive behaviors, neuroadaption is not the same as addiction. If neuroadaptation and its common manifestation of physical dependence were the same as addiction, then it would be incorrect to consider pathological gambling as an addictive behavior. It would be inaccurate to talk about sex and love addicts. *****Many people who use narcotics as post-operative pain medications never display addictive behavior even though they have became dependent physically on these psychoactive substances.******

Addiction almost always has physical dependence however physical dependence does not mean addiction. Addiction is the PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED for the drug the NEED for the feeling the NEED for the high. Physical dependence is the withdrawl the chemical PHYSICAL changes. Addiction is a psych disorder and physical dependence is a medical disorder.
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#19 Consumer Suggestion

What pain med's do you take

AUTHOR: Steven - (U.S.A.)

Chances are they are Oxycodone or Hydrocodone. Both of these are narcotic and addictive. You may also be building a tolerance for them. If the pain meds aren't working and you absolutely need them maybe try switching from one to another.

The pharmacist is just concerned with your well being. If he thinks you are abusing them he does have the right to contact the police and turn you in as well.

There could also be other reasons for giving you fewer than you are prescribed such as having a low inventory on hand. They should tell you this when you order them or pick them up. Sometimes they will charge you a lower rate when they do this as well. They will give you enough for a few days and you can pick up the rest.

Don't start crying and saying you don't understand cause I do. I suffer from chronic pain and can sympathize with you to an extent but the way you are complaining you should consider changing medications or have you doctor start winding down your dosages or something along those lines.
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#20 Consumer Suggestion

What pain med's do you take

AUTHOR: Steven - (U.S.A.)

Chances are they are Oxycodone or Hydrocodone. Both of these are narcotic and addictive. You may also be building a tolerance for them. If the pain meds aren't working and you absolutely need them maybe try switching from one to another.

The pharmacist is just concerned with your well being. If he thinks you are abusing them he does have the right to contact the police and turn you in as well.

There could also be other reasons for giving you fewer than you are prescribed such as having a low inventory on hand. They should tell you this when you order them or pick them up. Sometimes they will charge you a lower rate when they do this as well. They will give you enough for a few days and you can pick up the rest.

Don't start crying and saying you don't understand cause I do. I suffer from chronic pain and can sympathize with you to an extent but the way you are complaining you should consider changing medications or have you doctor start winding down your dosages or something along those lines.
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#21 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Good Lord, if It's such a Problem, CALL YOUR DOCTOR!

AUTHOR: Nick - (U.S.A.)

Offenburg,

If you had a bad month with pain and needed some more pain meds for the month you could easily call your doctor to override the pharmacist. But only to be fair, if your doctor denies you an override, you must write a Ripoff Report entry about his practice and tell Imalawyer to join in on your tirade. You both should team up and sue Walgreens and his practice. Show up on 60 minutes too. You could be famous and Imalawyer can get 30%. You would be like a suffering geriatric Michael Moore. Think about it.

Or... you could worry about your liver and listen to your pharmacist (because Tylenol is harmful to your liver). And your death would not be hanging over his/her head for the rest of their life.
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#22 UPDATE EX-employee responds

Pharmacist are DOCTORS.

AUTHOR: Shaina MacMath - (U.S.A.)

Pharmacist are Doctors. They have a PhD now. There are FEDERAL laws that pharmacies have to follow when it comes to dispensing your PAIN MEDS.

There are limitations on quanities and how many refills one may have on a pain prescription.

And if your doctor wrote for an illegal quanitity, technically the pharmacist and void your prescription. ITS THE LAW! They do YOU a favor but allow you to just get the correct quantity.
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#23 Consumer Suggestion

Health Professional? As what?

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

Heidi

""With out knowing the actual drug and dosage orders I can't say for sure but as a healthcare professional I might not have given the whole amount either. ""

""And as for the whole question of addiction and withdrawl...Addiction is the psychological need for the drug. ""

""What most pain management patients have is physical dependence which is where the body gets 'used' to the medication and will go through withdrawl when they don't get it. Physical dependence is not addiction.""

It's not? Then what is it? According to what medical standard? An addiction can be psychological and/or physiological.

Is the pain of herion withdrawal psychological? Of course not. It's the body's physical reaction to not having it - it's a physiological reaction because the body has adapted to the drug to such an extreme that the body now requires it for normal function.

Also, there is a particular addiction in which the sudden withdrawal of the drug can actually kill someone! Know what drug addiction can yeild to death when the addict attempts to go "cold turkey?" ALCOHOL. Is this death, caused by the sudden withdrawal of alcohol psychological???
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#24 Consumer Comment

Hey Bart I'm a Sap?

AUTHOR: Imalawyr - (U.S.A.)

You seem to like to Bully and insult people. Do you get some type of satisfaction from it ?
When your girl friend left you because you would not move out of your Mom's house, get a job or lose weight you became bitter. It is not her fault you practice an alternative sex life style. Lighten up on other people.
Your drug addiction is causing you to embarrass yourself in real time. The fact that you are a registered sex offender is no reason to insult other people. You have too many petty faults to attack others.

Now who is the sap?
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#25 Consumer Comment

If you want positive feedback then

AUTHOR: Stacey - (U.S.A.)

Stop calling all the posters idiots and Ignorant
Some of us to have college educations
Stacey
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#26 Consumer Comment

Tylenol amounts

AUTHOR: Heidi - (U.S.A.)

The pharmacist is actually correct but it is in the practice act that the pharmacist can not fill a prescription that requires the patient to take an over-dose of acetaminphen (Tylenol). The maximum amount of Tylenol is 4000mg in 24 hours. That is 2 Vicodin ES every 6 hours, 2 Percocet 5 every 5 hours, and the 7.5/650 vicodin 1 every 4-5 hours.

With out knowing the actual drug and dosage orders I can't say for sure but as a healthcare professional I might not have given the whole amount either. There are better options out now for pain control and the Federal government is cracking down on narcotic prescriptions, the doctors who write them and the pharmacist who fill them. I recommend speaking with you doctor or a pain management specialist about other options.

And as for the whole question of addiction and withdrawl...Addiction is the psychological need for the drug. What most pain management patients have is physical dependence which is where the body gets "used" to the medication and will go through withdrawl when they don't get it. Physical dependence is not addiction.
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#27 Consumer Comment

No one really said you are a drug addict.

AUTHOR: Bart - (U.S.A.)

But your posts SCREAM withdrawal. Or, it could be the lack of income that is lost from the street. Glad to see you found an unknowing sap to finally agree with you. Funny how he knows the same nothing that others do but he is somehow right.
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#28 Author of original report

THANK YOU Imalawyr.

AUTHOR: Patricia Offenberg - (U.S.A.)

You are using your commem semse. I like that.
I'm sick and tired of being called a drug addict by these narrow-minded people.
They need to get out of their boxes and use some common sense, if they have any.
I do not argue the facts that there are a lot of people abusing pain meds. If they suspect abuse or don't know the person and have REASON to suspect anything is not right, they do have the right to question it.
I had been going to this Walgreens for many years and getting this prescription every month. They have all my records, know my address, phone number, the doctors' phone number, etc. They had no cause to hold my meds and I needed them. After all the years I've been getting them, at this same store, all of a sudden the pharmacist decided I was taking too many.
The funny thing is, they didn't use the narcotic as an excuse not to fill them. What they said was that I was 'not allowed' by FEDERAL LAW to take that much 'tylenol', which is the other ingredient in these meds.
I just don't see why they do this to their good customers and kick them out of the store. And also, this happened before and I called the district manager, who took their side and did nothing. Then I called him again this time and he wouldn't even call me back.
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#29 Consumer Comment

Different states have different laws.

AUTHOR: Heidi - (U.S.A.)

In Colorado a pharmacist can decrease the number of pills given. They can (and do) change orders. An order change by the pharmacist in a hospital or nursing home setting is done routinely. The only thing that the pharmacist can not do is increase the number of pills given. They change from one drug to a similar formulary drug, change doses based on lab values (antibiotics, blood thinners) and can give out a 2-3 day supply of non narcotic medications with out an MD order (while they are waining on the order to be called in). If the pharmacist fills a prescription that any normal person with the same education would question and something happens to the patient it is the pharmacist that could lose his liscense not the doctor. I have seen it happen here in Colorado a few times where a doctor wrote a bad prescription and the pharmacy filled it and the patient died and the pharmacist on duty lost his liscense and the doctor didn't.
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#30 Consumer Comment

You are WRONG people

AUTHOR: Imalawyr - (U.S.A.)

The pharmacist does not have the right to alter a M D's prescription. He can question it. He can refuse to fill it. Any business has the right to refuse service. Only a M.D. or Nurse Practitioner in some states can diagnose and or prescribe medication. The pharmacist is licensed to fill the prescription only. Not write or alter it. Contact an Attorney in your state and file a Malpractice complaint with you states pharmacological board.

I know a man who has a Doctorate Degree in Trash recycling. Does that give him the right to alter prescriptions?
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#31 Consumer Comment

You are WRONG people

AUTHOR: Imalawyr - (U.S.A.)

The pharmacist does not have the right to alter a M D's prescription. He can question it. He can refuse to fill it. Any business has the right to refuse service. Only a M.D. or Nurse Practitioner in some states can diagnose and or prescribe medication. The pharmacist is licensed to fill the prescription only. Not write or alter it. Contact an Attorney in your state and file a Malpractice complaint with you states pharmacological board.

I know a man who has a Doctorate Degree in Trash recycling. Does that give him the right to alter prescriptions?
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#32 Consumer Comment

You are WRONG people

AUTHOR: Imalawyr - (U.S.A.)

The pharmacist does not have the right to alter a M D's prescription. He can question it. He can refuse to fill it. Any business has the right to refuse service. Only a M.D. or Nurse Practitioner in some states can diagnose and or prescribe medication. The pharmacist is licensed to fill the prescription only. Not write or alter it. Contact an Attorney in your state and file a Malpractice complaint with you states pharmacological board.

I know a man who has a Doctorate Degree in Trash recycling. Does that give him the right to alter prescriptions?
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#33 Consumer Comment

You are WRONG people

AUTHOR: Imalawyr - (U.S.A.)

The pharmacist does not have the right to alter a M D's prescription. He can question it. He can refuse to fill it. Any business has the right to refuse service. Only a M.D. or Nurse Practitioner in some states can diagnose and or prescribe medication. The pharmacist is licensed to fill the prescription only. Not write or alter it. Contact an Attorney in your state and file a Malpractice complaint with you states pharmacological board.

I know a man who has a Doctorate Degree in Trash recycling. Does that give him the right to alter prescriptions?
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#34 Consumer Comment

I agree with the responders

AUTHOR: Stacey - (U.S.A.)

My Pharmacist will not refill my Nexium or my Paxil if he/she feels that I may be abusing - The Pharmacist will call my Dr to verify this - And these meds are no way related to pain management - therefore if you are not satisfied with what the Pharmacist has to say then seek a second opinion with another Physician -
But boils down to this - pain medication can be addictive and since I do work in the Health Care industry there are many Physicians who prescribe opiates and other addictive drugs - If you reply on this drugs to live day to day then seek another opinion or seek help
Stacey
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#35 Consumer Comment

Stupid & Ignorant?

AUTHOR: Nikki - (U.S.A.)

In my post, I wrote, "Most people on pain meds are addicted to them."

In your answer, you wrote, "How can anyone be stupid enough to say, 'everyone who takes pain meds long term is a drug addict?'"

If you are going to call me stupid, please get the quote correct.

You also wrote, "Your ignorant attitude and thinking is the problem." I am far from ignorant in this matter as I am the sober one who saw many loved ones' lives ruined from pain medication.

By the way, you should re-read my post. The only portion directed straight at you was my lesson on a Doctorate Degree and the concern I expressed in my last paragraph. The way you reacted to me reminds me of a conversation I had with my father when I was in my teens. I expressed concerns for his using and he called me stupid and said that I don't know what I'm talking about. Then he died.
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#36 Consumer Comment

Stupid & Ignorant?

AUTHOR: Nikki - (U.S.A.)

In my post, I wrote, "Most people on pain meds are addicted to them."

In your answer, you wrote, "How can anyone be stupid enough to say, 'everyone who takes pain meds long term is a drug addict?'"

If you are going to call me stupid, please get the quote correct.

You also wrote, "Your ignorant attitude and thinking is the problem." I am far from ignorant in this matter as I am the sober one who saw many loved ones' lives ruined from pain medication.

By the way, you should re-read my post. The only portion directed straight at you was my lesson on a Doctorate Degree and the concern I expressed in my last paragraph. The way you reacted to me reminds me of a conversation I had with my father when I was in my teens. I expressed concerns for his using and he called me stupid and said that I don't know what I'm talking about. Then he died.
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#37 Consumer Comment

Stupid & Ignorant?

AUTHOR: Nikki - (U.S.A.)

In my post, I wrote, "Most people on pain meds are addicted to them."

In your answer, you wrote, "How can anyone be stupid enough to say, 'everyone who takes pain meds long term is a drug addict?'"

If you are going to call me stupid, please get the quote correct.

You also wrote, "Your ignorant attitude and thinking is the problem." I am far from ignorant in this matter as I am the sober one who saw many loved ones' lives ruined from pain medication.

By the way, you should re-read my post. The only portion directed straight at you was my lesson on a Doctorate Degree and the concern I expressed in my last paragraph. The way you reacted to me reminds me of a conversation I had with my father when I was in my teens. I expressed concerns for his using and he called me stupid and said that I don't know what I'm talking about. Then he died.
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#38 Consumer Comment

Patricia

AUTHOR: Gabriel - (U.S.A.)

"If you would've read my complete post, I said I've had treatments, therapy, catscans, MRI's etc."

CAT scans and MRI's are not treatments. They are tools to find an answer or solution for your problem.


"If a pharmacist had as much knowledge and experience as a doctor, they'd get paid much more."

I bet you more pharmacists make more money than doctors do on their first year out of school.
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#39 Author of original report

THIS DOES NOT MAKE THE PHARMICIST A DOCTOR

AUTHOR: Patricia Offenberg - (U.S.A.)

Maybe someday you people will understand the difference between NEEDING meds for PAIN and wanting them to get high. If you work all your life doing hard manual work and wear out your body at an old age, I believe you deserve not to have severe pain for what's left of your life.
I've taken these for several years. I've been to another doctor and he incresed my meds. If you would've read my complete post, I said I've had treatments, therapy, catscans, MRI's etc.
It's the drug addicts and ignorance that make it hard for people who really do NEED pain meds. By the way, I do take the weakest strength, which only numbs my pain, but does let me live at least a partially normal life.

And I don't care what anyone says, getting a doctorate does not make anyone a 'doctor' MEDICAL DOCTOR. This IS ignorance.
If a pharmacist had as much knowledge and experience as a doctor, they'd get paid much more. Also, my "doctor" is a specialist and knows my medical history and my injuries. No pharmacist does have this knowledge, and without it, they have no right to override a doctors authority. If they had enough sense, they'd call the doctor if they had a problem before taking it upon the ignorant, arrogant selves before judging a situation that they know nothing about and call the doctor.

Doesn't anyone have common sense? You people have no more right to judge my situation than the idiot pharmacists, yet you are doing just that. Where do you get the authority to make this decision about my life?

By the way, I would commit suicide if I had to live with as much pain as I have without the meds, because my life would be useless and miserable.

I am a good person and live a good life.
DO NOT JUDGE, LEAST YOU be JUDGED. (from the bible).
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#40 Consumer Suggestion

Some things to think about...

AUTHOR: Robert - (U.S.A.)

Patty,

The pharmacist is just doing their job. You are correct that they are to fill perscriptions. But you also said:
"When my doctor gives me a prescription, it is the pharmacist JOB to fill it, unless there is reasonable cause not to."

So if the pharmacist thinks there is a reasonable cause NOT to give you all of your pain pills he is under obligation NOT to give them to you. Now, what you think is reasonable and what he thinks is reasonable is probably two very different things. But he has years of education and experience that you probably don't have(in terms of medicine). But as Niki said if you are that worried about being able to get your pain pills that they had to call the police you may have a problem. These pain pills can actually cause more damage than the pain, and if you talk to people in "recovery" they will tell you the same thing.

I would actually suggest to go to a new doctor and see what they say. Sometimes a fresh mind will give you alternatives that the current doctor did not think of.
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#41 Consumer Comment

A Pharmacist is a Doctor

AUTHOR: Jim - (U.S.A.)

Patty, your pharmacist went to Pharmacology school and obtain a doctorate in Pharmacology - that allows him to be called a doctor. Before you spout the term "ignorant", I would encourage you to find out what courses a pharmacist has to take in order to receive a Doctorate in Pharmacology. You will find your pharmacist took many of the same types of courses your Medical Doctor did and many your Medical Doctor did not take. If you are unwilling to do that much investigation, then don't toss the word "ignorant" around unless you are willing to look in the mirror and address that comment to yourself.

But you asked another interesting question and that is, "what do they do with all the pills that they keep?" Pharmacists are required to keep records (under FDA rules) of many pain medications they actually dispense because of the potential for people feeding their drug abuses through the pharmacy process. If the Pharmacist runs afoul of the FDA with regards to this process, the Pharmacist can have his license yanked. In many cases, the Pharmacist has to live under certain guidelines more stringent than that of your Medical Doctor. In fact, the FDA has even strengthened those requirements within the past year to extend to certain over-the-counter medicines that could be used in combination with other medicines to make illegal drugs, most notably crystal meth.

Based on your own writings, I have to side with the Pharmacist on this one; he has the ability and the right under the law to overrule your M.D. and reduce your medication if the Pharmacist believes the dosage will bring harm to you. What you can do is have your M.D. call the Pharmacist and find out what the concerns are. Given the number of medications you are taking, the Pharmacist may have a concern with regards to all of the meds you're taking and the side effects they may bring. The M.D. and Pharmacist can generally work this sort of issue out.

The Pharmacist also has the right to toss you from the store; I've seen it happen and the police generally side with the Pharmacist because both have interests in preventing drug abuse, regardless of what form the abuse takes. And for next time, the Pharmacist IS a doctor. He may not be your doctor, but that title is his and it was earned.
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#42 Consumer Comment

Wow-you really are jonesing

AUTHOR: Bart - (U.S.A.)

Your off-the-handle posts are further proof you have no idea.
As Nikki said, anyone who has a doctorate can use the term "doctor"

From Wiki:
A doctorate is an academic degree of, in many countries, the highest level, second only to the habilitation in those (primarily Central and Eastern European) countries that grant the latter. The term doctorate comes from the Latin "doctor", meaning "teacher."

Please continue with the online withdrawal display.
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#43 Author of original report

THIS KIND OF IGNORANCE IS THE PROBLEM

AUTHOR: Patricia Offenberg - (U.S.A.)

A pharmacist is not a doctor, you are wrong. Having a 'doctorate' does not make anyone a doctor. You are sick and should know better.
I am NOT a drug addict, you are wrong again.
I take these for SEVERE pain and never take more than MY DOCTOR prescribes. Not all people who take pain meds are drug addicts, my problem is pain, not addiction.
YOUR KIND OF IGNORANCE and ATTITUDE IS THE PROBLEM.
I am 65 years old and have pain caused from working hard doing manual labor all of my life. Drug addicts take more meds and more often than they should. I do NOT do this. I have self control. Drug addicts cannot control their addiction.
Do you know that hundreds of people have commited suicide because of having so much pain, they'd rather be dead. Because ignorant people think the way you do.
Pain meds are given for pain. They are not illegal drugs.
When my doctor gives me these meds, he has a reason and sees me frequently and xrays and examines me regularly. I've had many, many scans, treatments, etc. for years.
When my doctor gives me a prescription, it is the pharmacist JOB to fill it, unless there is reasonable cause not to.
Your ignorant attitude and thinking is the problem.
How can anyone be stupid enough to say, 'everyone who takes pain meds long term is a drug addict?'
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#44 Consumer Comment

Anyone with a Doctorate Degree is a doctor.

AUTHOR: Nikki - (U.S.A.)

First, anyone with a Doctorate Degree is labelled a doctor. Many school principals, teachers, doctors, pharmacists, etc., have their doctorate degrees and therefore have the title, doctor. I belive you were looking for the term M.D., or something similar.

Second, I come from a long list of family members who are on paid meds and a few who died because of them. I can certainly see where the pharmacist was coming from. Do you know what it's like, day in a day out, to listen to those on pain meds ramble on about how they need them? You can just imagine some of the things those peope on pain meds say when their pharmacist cannot fill their meds. Most people on pain meds are addicted to them. They need them because they are addicted, not because they are in actual pain. It's very easy for addicts to dupe their doctor into believing they need the meds. And there are many doctors who prescribe them just to not have to deal with their patients tempers if they don't. Of course, not to mention, the amount of times doctors are switched by addicts because the former doctor won't write the prescriptions anymore. However, the insurance companies and the pharmacists know how often, quantities, etc., and there are now some real crackdowns on the pharmacists for filling too many. Why should they lose their license so addicts can have their pills? I don't blame the pharmacist for calling the police. Have you seen how some addicts act when they can't get their pills?

If you have been on pain meds for years, I fear it may be too late for you. I urge you to do whatever you can to get off them, rather than do whatever you can to get them.
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