• Report: #1101357

Complaint Review: Evolution Cane Corso

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  • Submitted: Thu, November 21, 2013
  • Updated: Fri, November 22, 2013

  • Reported By: CaneCorso — Reno Nevada
Evolution Cane Corso
9550 Main Street Potter Valley, California USA

Evolution Cane Corso Mitchel Mount and Victoria Mount BUYER BEWARE Potter Valley California

*Author of original report: Edited

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This is to Mitchel Mount and Victoria Mount with Evolution Cane Corso who have blocked me and refuse to take my calls. [continued below]....
..... 

CH. EVOLUTION’S INDOMITABLE SPIRIT CLOVER, CGC
I am writing this hoping that it will reach the next person buying their new puppy and hopefully they wont make the same mistake we did.

I fell in love with the breed a few years ago and knew I had to have one. They are like potato chips, you can’t just have one. We bought Clover in June of 2011, and picked her up at the breeder’s in Potter Valley, CA. Thinking back on it now there were so many signs, telling us we shouldn’t be dealing with this guy, but us being the unsuspected buyer, we were blinded and only saw the cute adorable puppies. The breeder had told us that both the parents had their health clearances, we believed him and didn’t ask to see copies of their certification, (mistake #1). Also we weren’t allowed to visit with the dad as he was behind a kennel and the breeder wouldn’t take him out, (mistake #2). Almost all his dogs were in kennels except for a few older puppies. We brought Clover home and immediately took her to the vet, per our contract to make sure she was healthy and to our surprise she wasn’t. The vet informed us that she had Giardia, Coccidia, a deformed toe and an umbilical hernia. We told the vet that we had bought her as a breed quality dog and she told us there is no way, she would ever sell a dog like this as breed quality. We called the breeder immediately and they informed us that it was no big deal, it was common in puppies to get parasites and the toe deformity was probably caused from an injury by her litter mates, and the umbilical hernia is just cosmetic and they would pay to have it fixed but not necessary. So we debated and of course decided to believe them and keep her, (mistake#3). After several months of medication to get rid of the parasites, Clover was finally a healthy girl.

A year had passed and Clover went to a few shows and became an AKC Champion in just a few weekends. We were thrilled finally things were looking up. Then we noticed this red ball in the corner of her eyes. We googled it and sure enough Cherry Eye. Although we know it is not covered and is common in the breed, it was just icing on the cake. After 5 eye surgeries on both eyes, we had finally got rid of the Cherry Eye.
Clover turned 2 on April 13, 2013 and we decided to take her in to get her OFA done, per our contract. The vet called and said there was a problem. We went in to talk to the vet and he said there was no way Clover would pass, she was dyslpastic. We were crushed, and went home to do more of our own research.We looked at so many sites, and different dogs X-rays and thought maybe the vet did a bad xray. So we decided to have her PENN Hip done a couple weeks later, for a second opinion along with our other 3 Corso’s. The vet brought us in to show us the X-rays, Romulus was first and he said he looked good, Ceralia was second and he said hers were perfect and then Clover, who we knew immediately looking at them they looked nothing like the previous two dogs. He said he thought the right hip gave him major concern and the left wasn’t much better. We submitted the X-rays and they came back dysplastic. To give you a breakdown on her results:
Clover's right hip is .53 and recorded by Penn Hip with confirmed hip dysplasia. Our (vets) have informed us that her being so young and her hips being so bad, that there will come a time (in the future) that we will eventually have to make the decision to put her down because the pain will be too much for her or opt for surgery which can range from $5,000 to $10,000. Clover's left hip is at .65 with no signs of DJD yet. Let’s say her right hip wasn’t dysplastic, her DI on the right is .53, that puts her under the median for Cane Corso's for both hips. So with that being said her left is actually worse than her right. The median for Corso’s is .61. Even if her right hip wasn't dysplastic her score would have been only 40th percentile. We have spoken with many different vet's that are all orthopedic surgeons and also several reputable Cane Corso breeders and have reviewed the CCAA website, all have which confirmed she would not be a good candidate to breed. 

The breeder told us if all her other qualities outweighed the hip dyslpasia, then we should just go ahead and breed her. We couldn’t believe it. He said it was caused from an injury or environmental, so she wouldn’t pass it on to her pups. We did everything with her the same as Ceralia and Ceralia has excellent hips, yet it’s an injury or environmental,
NO.

We never thought she had any problems as we hadn't researched HD and didn't know what to look for. We submitted her OFA as well and she came back moderate. After getting back results from OFA, Penn Hip and speaking to several vets and different breeders we realized that there was nothing we could have done to prevent this, it's GENETIC. We also know after we started reading more and more on HD, that Clover has never been as active as the other dogs. We just thought she was lazy, after playing for short bits she would always lay down, and not get back up. Lately we have noticed limping and know it is just a matter of time before it gets worse. Simple things she can't do anymore, like getting in the car or even getting up on the couch and she is only 2. We know you can take two dogs with excellent hips and get dysplastic dogs, but why not do the right thing and flood the gene pool with the best hips possible, that is why we decided to spay her. We spayed Clover a couple months ago and even had her hips rechecked. 

The breeder wants us to take a replacement puppy from Clover’s mother. We can't take the chance of getting a dog from the same lines as Clover and go through this again. In our opinion Cassius her grandfather should have never been bred no matter how good his traits were, had we have done our research, we would have found this out and saved a ton of money and heartache, but that was the breeders choice and he is dealing with it now and still chooses to breed the mother, who just had a litter a few weeks ago. His hip scores were far too low and we now know that HD can skip generations and obviously did with Clover. This is why you should ask and check pedigree’s to make sure the puppy you are getting has had parents and grandparents, etc. with health certifications. We look at our dogs, not just as dogs, but as members of our family and it is going to be heartbreaking to watch Clover go downhill. Breeding shouldn’t be about profit, but to better the breed and to make it better. We will make Clover as comfortable as possible for the rest of her life, but to know that it could have been prevented and there are still puppies being sold to unsuspected buyers is just gut turning. I know we have learned from this experience and it will make us better, and to do the right thing with our dogs. I am sorry for having to post this on facebook, but ignoring your puppy owner who never did anything but try and cooperate with you is not the way to handle it. He said he would offer us life long support. I guess not if our dog has Hip Dysplasia. I would appreciate you removing her from your website under news unless you would like to announce her hip results on their as well. Thanks Evolution Cane Corso we appreciate you.
 
 
 
 



 

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 11/21/2013 08:52 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Evolution-Cane-Corso/Potter-Valley-California-95469/Evolution-Cane-Corso-Mitchel-Mount-and-Victoria-Mount-BUYER-BEWARE-Potter-Valley-Californ-1101357. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Author of original report

Edited

AUTHOR: Cane Corso - ()

This is to Mitchel Mount and Victoria Mount with Evolution Cane Corso who have blocked me and refuse to take my calls. 

CH. EVOLUTION’S INDOMITABLE SPIRIT CLOVER, CGC
I am writing this hoping that it will reach the next person buying their new puppy and hopefully they wont make the same mistake we did.

I fell in love with the breed a few years ago and knew I had to have one. They are like potato chips, you can’t just have one. We bought Clover in June of 2011, and picked her up at the breeder’s in Potter Valley, CA. Thinking back on it now there were so many signs, telling us we shouldn’t be dealing with this guy, but us being the unsuspected buyer, we were blinded and only saw the cute adorable puppies. The breeder had told us that both the parents had their health clearances, we believed him and didn’t ask to see copies of their certification, (mistake #1). Also we weren’t allowed to visit with the dad as he was behind a kennel and the breeder wouldn’t take him out, (mistake #2). Almost all his dogs were in kennels except for a few older puppies. We brought Clover home and immediately took her to the vet, per our contract to make sure she was healthy and to our surprise she wasn’t. The vet informed us that she had Giardia, Coccidia, a deformed toe and an umbilical hernia. We told the vet that we had bought her as a breed quality dog and she told us there is no way, she would ever sell a dog like this as breed quality. We called the breeder immediately and they informed us that it was no big deal, it was common in puppies to get parasites and the toe deformity was probably caused from an injury by her litter mates, and the umbilical hernia is just cosmetic and they would pay to have it fixed but not necessary. So we debated and of course decided to believe them and keep her, (mistake#3). After several months of medication to get rid of the parasites, Clover was finally a healthy girl.

A year had passed and Clover went to a few shows and became an AKC Champion in just a few weekends. We were thrilled finally things were looking up. Then we noticed this red ball in the corner of her eyes. We googled it and sure enough Cherry Eye. Although we know it is not covered and is common in the breed, it was just icing on the cake. After 5 eye surgeries on both eyes, we had finally got rid of the Cherry Eye.

Clover turned 2 on April 13, 2013 and we decided to take her in to get her OFA done, per our contract. The vet called and said there was a problem. We went in to talk to the vet and he said there was no way Clover would pass, she was dyslpastic. We were crushed, and went home to do more of our own research.We looked at so many sites, and different dogs X-rays and thought maybe the vet did a bad xray. So we decided to have her PENN Hip done a couple weeks later, for a second opinion along with our other 3 Corso’s. The vet brought us in to show us the X-rays, Romulus was first and he said he looked good, Ceralia was second and he said hers were perfect and then Clover, who we knew immediately looking at them they looked nothing like the previous two dogs. He said he thought the right hip gave him major concern and the left wasn’t much better. We submitted the X-rays and they came back dysplastic.
To give you a breakdown on her results:
 
Clover's right hip is .53 and recorded by Penn Hip with confirmed hip dysplasia. Our (vets) have informed us that her being so young and her hips being so bad, that there will come a time (in the future) that we will eventually have to make the decision to put her down because the pain will be too much for her or opt for surgery which can range from $5,000 to $10,000. Clover's left hip is at .65 with no signs of DJD yet. Let’s say her right hip wasn’t dysplastic, her DI on the right is .53, that puts her under the median for Cane Corso's for both hips. So with that being said her left is actually worse than her right. The median for Corso’s is .61. Even if her right hip wasn't dysplastic her score would have been only 40th percentile. It clearly states on the CCAA website "At this time the CCAA recommends that breeders use dogs with hips that score at the median (50%) or better without the presents of DJD." We have spoken with many different vet's that are all orthopedic surgeons and also several reputable Cane Corso breeders and have reviewed the CCAA website, all have which confirmed she would not be a good candidate to breed nor could we have prevented her from being dysplastc. 

The breeder told us if all her other qualities outweighed the hip dyslpasia, then we should just go ahead and breed her. We couldn’t believe it. He said it was caused from an injury or environmental, so she wouldn’t pass it on to her pups. We did everything with her the same as Ceralia and Ceralia has excellent hips, yet it’s an injury or environmental, NO.

We never thought she had any problems as we hadn't researched HD and didn't know what to look for. We submitted her OFA as well and she came back moderate. After getting back results from OFA, Penn Hip and speaking to several vets and different breeders we realized that there was nothing we could have done to prevent this, it's GENETIC. We also know after we started reading more and more on HD, that Clover has never been as active as the other dogs. We just thought she was lazy, after playing for short bits she would always lay down, and not get back up. Lately we have noticed limping and know it is just a matter of time before it gets worse. Simple things she can't do anymore, like getting in the car or even getting up on the couch and she is only 2. We know you can take two dogs with excellent hips and get dysplastic dogs, but why not do the right thing and flood the gene pool with the best hips possible, that is why we decided to spay her. We spayed Clover a couple months ago and even had her hips rechecked. 

The breeder wants us to take a replacement puppy from Clover’s mother. We can't take the chance of getting a dog from the same lines as Clover and go through this again. In our opinion Cassius her grandfather should have never been bred no matter how good his traits were, he had 20th penn hip scores.Had we have done our research, we would have found this out and saved a ton of money and heartache, but that was the breeders choice and he is dealing with it now and still chooses to breed the mother, who just had a litter a few weeks ago. His hip scores were far too low and we now know that HD can skip generations and obviously did with Clover. This is why you should ask and check pedigree’s to make sure the puppy you are getting has had parents and grandparents, etc. with health certifications. We look at our dogs, not just as dogs, but as members of our family and it is going to be heartbreaking to watch Clover go downhill. Breeding shouldn’t be about profit, but to better the breed and to make it better. We will make Clover as comfortable as possible for the rest of her life, but to know that it could have been prevented and there are still puppies being sold to unsuspected buyers is just gut turning. I know we have learned from this experience and it will make us better, and to do the right thing with our dogs. Ignoring your puppy owner who never did anything but try and cooperate with you is not the way to handle it. He said we are not even entitled to a replacement puppy because it is not crippling dysplasia. He said he would offer us life long support. I guess not if your dog has hip dysplasia. I would appreciate you removing her from your website under news unless you would like to announce her hip results on their as well. He also has himself listed on his website as a member of the Cane Corso breed club and he isn't. Thanks Evolution Cane Corso we appreciate you.

 

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