• Report: #251306

Complaint Review: John Casablancas Modeling Acting And Career Center - Longwood (Orlando), FL

  • Submitted: Wed, May 30, 2007
  • Updated: Mon, August 04, 2008

  • Reported By:Rockledge Florida
John Casablancas Modeling Acting And Career Center - Longwood (Orlando), FL
1060 West State Rd 434, Suite 136 Longwood, Florida U.S.A.

John Casablancas Modeling Acting And Career Center ripoff Beware of Amy Read Tejeda or Other Admission Directors - 24 classes at $1800+ Longwood Florida

*Consumer Comment: scam with high pressure sales pitches

*Consumer Comment: re: My daughter went through training

*UPDATE Employee: The offer seemed pretty clear. Where's the rip off?

*UPDATE Employee: The offer seemed pretty clear. Where's the rip off?

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Overall, Here's what it comes down too!

The potential model/actor is told they are making final selections of girls within your range and need to meet with you and your parents no later than the cut-off date. All seems professional up to the point of your family entering the room with the admissions director and there she asks pointed questions to the potential client of why they want to be a model/actor? Do you have the drive and commitment? Parents, do you stand behind your child's decision and will you support her in this endeavor? All of which, the director is playing on the emotions of the teenager/child and building their hopes that this agency wants them.

The director listed above "AMY" even went so far as to cry on cue when she mentioned that the teenager had such great supporting parents and she just does not see that in her line of work. (generally not true, as most teenagers don't carry the amount of money the agency is looking for and since the teenager is under age, then it takes a parent to sign the commitment contract. If the parent was not supportive, the teenager would not be there either).

The initial meeting mentions they are making their final selection and the director knows there were only three slots available and they have just filled two of them and believe your teenager has what it takes to fill the third. But we must hurry with the process as there are other directors reviewing potential clients and may sign them up in the last slot if we don't act now. Once this is thrown out there and the teenager realizes that he/she is being considered, excitement draws the interest further and the director then lays out the requirements of 24 classes and within this, they will learn make-up, hair, acting techniques, runway, interviewing, etc... all for the price of $1,899, plus an additional $199 for the make-up kit and book. By the way, that's not all! There will even be additional photo shoots that may cost you more money in the development of your portfolio as the photo shoots they arrange may not be of the quality used in a portfolio taken during the classes.

Have I laid it out for you in terms that says this is a SCAM and you really need to RUN from this and other companies of the like???? If not, throw away your money. Luckily for me, my parents are wise to these tactics and there is even a Florida Statute identifying these mandates are against the law.

Here is the Statute:Title XXXII, Chapter 468, Part 410 (Talent Agencies)

468.410 Prohibition against registration fees; referral.--

(1) A talent agency may not charge a registration fee.

(2) No talent agency shall, as a condition to registering or obtaining employment for any applicant or artist, require the applicant or artist to subscribe to, purchase, or attend any publication, postcard service, advertisement, resume service, photography service, school, acting school, workshop, acting workshop, or video or audiotapes.

(3) A talent agency shall give each applicant a copy of a contract which lists the services to be provided and the fees to be charged. The contract shall state that the talent agency is regulated by the department and shall list the address and telephone number of the department.

History.--ss. 10, 15, ch. 86-292; s. 2, ch. 90-202; s. 63, ch. 91-137; s. 13, ch. 91-156; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 27, ch. 94-119.

Tiffany
Rockledge, Florida
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 05/30/2007 07:44 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/John-Casablancas-Modeling-Acting-And-Career-Center-Longwood-Orlando-FL/Longwood-Florida-32750/John-Casablancas-Modeling-Acting-And-Career-Center-ripoff-Beware-of-Amy-Read-Tejeda-or-Oth-251306. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year.

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#1 Consumer Comment

scam with high pressure sales pitches

AUTHOR: Anonymous - (U.S.A.)

it's a scam because they put you under pressure with lies in order ot get you to sign up for their 'classes.' They pretend they are highly selective when in reality they'll take anyone who dishes up the money. The 'agents' are sales people who make high commissions off enrolling people and that's their only and real goal. They teach you basic bullsh*t of how to put make up on or what color is best for you or stupid things....then once you've decided you've invested your money in them their 'agency' 'may' be able to represent you or find you work and that is a huge most likely not- and the work they will initially get you is promo work something you can get on your own. No agency charges a fee for school in order to represent someone. Yes it's a modeling school but there really is no such thing as a modeling school- it's all a scam. it's not worth it unlses you 'feel' you have gotten something out of spending thousands of dollars on really nothing...and feel your child or you have gained something very valuable from their pathetic 'classes' they hold. All in all, I would stay far away- I tried doing it many years ago and luckily was able to get a refund before I was scammed out of good money for something that is worth basically nothing.
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#2 Consumer Comment

re: My daughter went through training

AUTHOR: Elena - (U.S.A.)

Tiffany,

I understand what you are saying about how much it costs, but John Casablancas did nothing wrong. They ARE NOT a talent agency, they are a modelling school.

They did an excellent job teaching my daughter about the business and showed her all of the ins and outs including how to walk, talk, act and interview. These are invaluable skills and if you don't feel like it's worth it, don't pay.

It's not a rip off though. It's expensive, but my daughter can take as many refresher classes as she wants and the school has an agent on staff that represents my daughter (not exclusively). They find out what's going on in the industry and list all opportunities on a website that alumnis can access.

Furthermore, aren't your parents the one building your hope anyway by taking you there in the first place? They obviously thought you could make it in the business. Parents are pretty smart when it comes to their children. They know when someone is lying about their kids and take correct action.

Bottom line. John Casablancas is out there to make money for their school and they have salespeople like every other business. Just because you don't like their brand of sales doesn't make it a scam. I don't care for their brand of selling either, but I am more than satisfied with the outcome.
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#3 UPDATE Employee

The offer seemed pretty clear. Where's the rip off?

AUTHOR: Realdeal - (U.S.A.)

There are a few factual errors in the report that I would like to answer as well as some misperceptions to be clarified. I am employed at the John Casablancas center in question and am in a position to know.

Starting at the bottom. The reporter, Tiffany, is quoting laws which apply to Agencies. However John Casablancas Modeling and Career Center in Longwood FL. is a Florida Board of Education licensed school teaching modeling, acting, and personal development. Therefore, as a school... they are well within the law to offer courses. They are affiliated with an agency, Model Talent Managment (MTM) which can accept talent from the school or find it independently... but no requirement of training is enforced by the Agency, MTM.

The report writer, who was being interviewed by the school, not the agent or agency, also takes issue with the selection process of the school. Where a admissions director might meet a candidate before acceptance into the school. However, the report is unclear why that would be a problem or a SCAM as she calls it. The report writer makes it clear in her own words that the school teaches "make-up, hair, acting techniques, runway, interviewing" all valuable skills for someone interested in learning about modeling techniques. So, if the offer is clearly for training and tuition is clearly stated, as was the case, where's the scam? It's a promise of training in a school designed for that purpose.

When someone comes away from an experience with bad feelings, they call it a scam. I think at the heart of a scam or ripoff, is a broken promise. But this report describes no promises that were made by the school that they were not prepared to keep, training. No outrageous claims of future modeling jobs were made. Based on the detailed reporting, it seems like the interview was pretty clear... if you want we will give you training in exchange for tuition. Which is a pretty standard deal in every college or other post-secondary educational institution in the country.
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#4 UPDATE Employee

The offer seemed pretty clear. Where's the rip off?

AUTHOR: Realdeal - (U.S.A.)

There are a few factual errors in the report that I would like to answer as well as some misperceptions to be clarified. I am employed at the John Casablancas center in question and am in a position to know.

Starting at the bottom. The reporter, Tiffany, is quoting laws which apply to Agencies. However John Casablancas Modeling and Career Center in Longwood FL. is a Florida Board of Education licensed school teaching modeling, acting, and personal development. Therefore, as a school... they are well within the law to offer courses. They are affiliated with an agency, Model Talent Managment (MTM) which can accept talent from the school or find it independently... but no requirement of training is enforced by the Agency, MTM.

The report writer, who was being interviewed by the school, not the agent or agency, also takes issue with the selection process of the school. Where a admissions director might meet a candidate before acceptance into the school. However, the report is unclear why that would be a problem or a SCAM as she calls it. The report writer makes it clear in her own words that the school teaches "make-up, hair, acting techniques, runway, interviewing" all valuable skills for someone interested in learning about modeling techniques. So, if the offer is clearly for training and tuition is clearly stated, as was the case, where's the scam? It's a promise of training in a school designed for that purpose.

When someone comes away from an experience with bad feelings, they call it a scam. I think at the heart of a scam or ripoff, is a broken promise. But this report describes no promises that were made by the school that they were not prepared to keep, training. No outrageous claims of future modeling jobs were made. Based on the detailed reporting, it seems like the interview was pretty clear... if you want we will give you training in exchange for tuition. Which is a pretty standard deal in every college or other post-secondary educational institution in the country.
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