Report: #1363651

Complaint Review: Jeff Light

  • Submitted: Thu, March 23, 2017
  • Updated: Fri, March 24, 2017
  • Reported By: BlackCube — NYC New York USA
  • Jeff Light

    Internet
    USA

Jeff Light Jeff Light, Publisher - Fake News Websites Jeff Light, Publisher - Fake News Websites San Diego Internet

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 Jeff Light, Publisher - Fake News Websites Fake News Websites are an attempt to play on gullible people who do not check sources and will just pass the news on as if it were really true. Fake news is a type of hoax or deliberate spread of misinformation, be it via the traditional news media or via social media, with the intent to mislead in order to gain financially or politically. It often employs eye-catching headlines or entirely fabricated news-stories in order to increase readership and, in the case of internet-based stories, online sharing. In the latter case, profit is made in a similar fashion to clickbait and relies on ad-revenue generated regardless of the veracity of the published stories.Easy access to ad-revenue, increased political polarization and the ubiquity of social media, primarily the Facebook newsfeed have been implicated in the spread of fake news.

Anonymously-hosted fake news websites lacking known publishers have also been implicated, because they make it difficult to prosecute sources of fake news for libel or slander. [continued below]....

..... Fake news, refers to false information or propaganda published under the guise of being authentic news. Fake news websites and channels push their fake news content in an attempt to mislead consumers of the content and spread misinformation via social networks and word-of-mouth. One of the more colorful definitions of fake news comes from PolitiFact: "Fake news is made-up stuff, masterfully manipulated to look like credible journalistic reports that are easily spread online to large audiences willing to believe the fictions and spread the word." The mission of fake news content isn't typically for financial gain — or at least not completely for profit — but rather for luring visitors in via clickbaiting and then getting content consumers to virally spread the false information or hoax news.Jeff Light grew up in Buffalo, N.Y., where his father was editor of the local newspaper.Over the last three decades, he has worked for newspapers and their web sites. He has been an editor, a reporter, a clerk, even a “hopper” – the person who throws the bundles of papers from the delivery trucks in the dead of night. He believes that journalism is one of society’s greatest callings. That is to say, it is one of the best things a person can do with his or her life.He studied poetry and creative writing at Brown University and has an MBA from the University of California, Irvine.He started as an intern writer in Syracuse, N.Y., in the early ‘80s. He was deputy editor, then Vice President for Interactive Publishing at the Orange County Register, where he worked from 1993 to 2010. He joined the Union-Tribune as Editor in March 2010.

Fake news is an inaccurate, sometimes sensationalistic report that is created to gain attention, mislead, deceive or damage a reputation. Unlike misinformation, which is inaccurate because a reporter has confused facts, fake news is created with the intent to manipulate someone or something. Fake news can spread quickly when it provides disinformation that is aligned with the audience's point of view because such content is not likely to be questioned or discounted. n recent years, the internet has provided a low-cost distribution channel for fake news. Posting fake news in discussion forums, website comment fields, blogs and social media websites requires little, if any, technical know-how. Social media websites in particular have proved to be an easy venue for distributing fake news. Bogus stories can be tweeted or posted from a mobile smartphone and quickly distributed to a large audience through retweets and sharing. Although some creators and distributors of fake news have political or social agendas, others are more entrepreneurial, using fake news that appeals to recipients on an emotional level to make money from digital advertising placed around the content. When fake news is used to spread propaganda, it can be dangerous. In addition to shaping public opinion and behavior, it can also cause mistrust, encourage dissent and deflect attention from real news.

In response to criticism about failing to curb the distribution of fake news during the 2016 presidential election in the United States, Facebook and Google have taken steps to crack down on disinformation. They have formed a coalition called First Draft and are working with major media outlets to educate Internet users about how to spot fake news. They are also working with third parties to create independent fact-checking websites and are exploring ways to identify and label news stories that can not be verified, much like the way Wikipedia editors label entries they feel should be questioned. Mr. Jeff Light has been Publisher of The San Diego Union-Tribune LLC, a subsidiary of Tribune Publishing Company since March 2016. Mr. Light serves as an Editor of The San Diego Union-Tribune, LLC and also served as its President. He served as Chief Operating Officer of The San Diego Union-Tribune, LLC. Mr. Light served as Vice President and Editor at The San Diego Union-Tribune, LLC. Mr. Light served as Vice President of Interactive of The Orange County Register Communications in Santa Ana. He served as Deputy Editor of The Orange County Register. Mr. Light served as Deputy Editor of OCRegister.com. On the internet, news that is created with the intent to deceive often has poor grammar and misspelled words; it may use racial language or have an excessive number of capital letters and exclamation points. To verify the accuracy of a news story, it can be useful to query a search engine in order to confirm that legitimate, traditional news sources are also covering the story; fake news stories often have only one source.

Another strategy for identifying fake news is to check the host site's domain name and URL. Often, fake news will appear to have a legitimate-sounding domain name, but will have a URL that ends in .com.co or another unusual suffix. Fake news is in the News these days, so what is it? The term is most often used to describe completely fabricated stories, but can also be applied to a broader continuum of news. Many news outlets will exhibit some form of explicit or implicit bias while not falling into the fake news category. Assessing the quality of the content is crucial to understanding whether what you are viewing is true or not. It is up to you to do the legwork to make sure your information is good. A recent study carried out by Stanford’s Graduate School of Education assessed more than 7,800 responses from middle school, high school and college students in 12 US states on their ability to assess information sources. Researchers were “shocked” by students’ “stunning and dismaying consistency” to evaluate information at even as basic a level as distinguishing advertisements from articles.

If you think you, an adult with an internet connection, are better placed than a middle school student to assess sources, this collection of comments on “literally unbelievable” humour stories is humbling. It’s not that readers are stupid, or even necessarily credulous: it’s that the news format is easy to imitate and some true stories are outlandish enough to beggar belief. In its purest form, fake news is completely made up, manipulated to resemble credible journalism and attract maximum attention and, with it, advertising revenue. Examples include: “Transgender tampon now on the market”, “Pope Francis at White House: ‘Koran and Holy Bible are the same’”, “U2’s Bono rescued during terror attack, issues sick message to victims”. Hosted on websites that often followed design conventions of online news media, with anodyne titles such as “Civic Tribune” and “Life Event Web” to give the semblance of legitimacy, the stories are geared to travel on social media. Strictly speaking, fake news is completely made up and designed to deceive readers to maximise traffic and profit. But the definition is often expanded to include websites that circulate distorted, decontextualised or dubious information through – for example – clickbaiting headlines that don’t reflect the facts of the story, or undeclared bias. With nearly all online media motivated to some extent by views, a publication doesn’t have to be written by teenagers in Macedonia to perpetuate misinformation. The very structure of the web enables what BuzzFeed’s head of data science calls “not-fake-but-not-completely-true information”.

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This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 03/23/2017 11:56 PM and is a permanent record located here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/jeff-light/internet/jeff-light-jeff-light-publisher-fake-news-websites-jeff-light-publisher-fake-news-1363651. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

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