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Report: #102790

Complaint Review: C.P.I., Inc. Dba The Pet Pad - Animal Kingdom - Phoenix Arizona

  • Submitted:
  • Updated:
  • Reported By: Phoenix Arizona
  • C.P.I., Inc. Dba The Pet Pad - Animal Kingdom 2001 North Black Canyou Hwy. Phoenix, Arizona U.S.A.

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We purchased a very adorable lond hair Dashsund at the Metro Center store on 2/15/2004. This was our second dog from this store. Many of our family members were referred for purchases as well.

However, our little Dachsund slipped through the medical cracks and we had to turn her over to a rescue, you see, she had Hypermetria Ataxia, a neurological disorder that causes the animal to fall, run into walls, not recognize its owners and may bite. Very sad, very sad!

The company refunded our purchase price of little "Snickers" but, would not pay for her medical blood work up which cost my family $420.30 to rule out all other problems. They covered the neurological visit and helped us get her to a rescue that also wanted us to pay $100.00 to turn her over.

We paid $799.00 for "Snickers" our pretty long hair Dachsund along with the $420.30 vet bill!

Now, we do not have the company and loving relationship that we had to give up for her rescue, along with the expense paid out toward her vet care.

In short, we have nothing for $520.30!!! That's more than 50% of her original cost!

I'm happy that she will get a chance for survival, but why should our family pay all this money to turn her over to rescue?

Jeffrey
Phoenix, Arizona
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 08/09/2004 12:20 PM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/cpi-inc-dba-the-pet-pad-animal-kingdom/phoenix-arizona-85009-2708/cpi-inc-dba-the-pet-padanimal-kingdom-beware-of-pet-store-pet-purchases-phoenix-ari-102790. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

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#5 Consumer Comment

Dog bought there had health issues too, but these are very common ...

AUTHOR: Sick_of_liars_&_cheats - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, November 08, 2008
As someone who bought a gorgeous 3-month-old golden retriever puppy from the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom in 1995, I was surprised to learn she had kennel cough when I took her to the vet for a check-up.

However, after speaking not only with two veterinarians but also with an aunt considered an authority on Doberman Pinschers, having spent more than two decades breeding and raising AKC-registered dog show award-winning Dobermans and listed annually in the Doberman Pinscher Club of America Member's Resource Directory, I learned that kennel cough is a very common respiratory infections in dogs.

Like the common cold spreads among humans, kennel cough, which is highly contagious, spreads among dogs. Just as a cold is more likely to spread among people who are in close contact with one another inside an office building, kennel cough is more likely to spread among dogs in close contact with one another in enclosed areas such as kennels, animal shelters, and dog day care facilities.

I had my golden girl treated and she was fine after that. I never considered asking the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom to reimburse me for the expense. That would be like insisting a hospital reimburse me for the cost of a visit to the pediatrician to find that the 3-day-old baby I just brought home has a cold.

Even if my golden had been diagnosed with more health problems, why would I blame the pet store? Evidence points to the fact that that while the majority of pet stores do deal with puppy mills, they don't knowingly do so. I feel that the responsibility lies with the U.S. government, which advised farmers to begin breeding dogs for profit in the 1960s.

Health problems in dogs are hereditary/congenital or acquired through injury or environmental conditions. Poor genetic health is often perpetuated by amateur breeders and puppy mills breeding dogs without screening the parents. Responsible breeders devote a great deal of time and resources to trying to eradicate genetic diseases in their lines, although this is difficult because the same selective breeding used to magnify desirable traits increases the chances of genetic illnesses in purebred dogs. Genetic conditions can lead to health problems including allergies, eye diseases, musculoskeletal disorders such as hip dysplasia, heart disease, endocrine disorders, blood disorders, hearing disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, kidney diseases, epilepsy, respiratory disorders, and autoimmune diseases.

Even if my dog had been diagnosed with other health issues, I never thought of turning her over to rescue, and I don't understand why you made such a decision. If you loved Snickers and spent so much money on a diagnosis and treatment, why would you give her up? Would you do the same to a human child?

I was forced to put my beloved golden purchased in 1995 from the Pet Pad down in 2007 not because of anything related to her being from a pet store but because she developed kidney failure, vomiting and other symptoms related to treats I had been feeding her that apparently contained melamine. Around the time she became sick, there had been quite a bit of publicity and stories on pet foods being recalled, and some newspapers and websites had lists of foods recalled, but apparently the lists distributed at that time did not include every recalled product. Had the vets I taken her to known or had I known, they might have been able to test her for the chemical and take steps to save her.

But all I could do, besides take her to one vet after another, was helplessly watch as three months passed without my beloved girl getting any better. No food or beverage, no medication, nothing prescribed or advised by the vets was of any help, and my beloved girl grew sicker and weaker. I would cuddle her, and sob as I clung to her, holding her ever more tightly, trying to keep her with me, trying to will her well, trying desperately to soothe her each time after lifting her thin little body up from the ground or the floor from where she had collapsed, depleted, in her own vomit.

I spent more than $7,000 trying to save her, trying to get a diagnosis, a treatment. It wasn't until weeks later when I saw the treats I had given my baby, my dearest friend and companion, the love of my life, listed among hundreds of other recalled food and treats that I realized what had happened. The list, available through an FDA link, featured product codes that, when I checked the bags of treats I hadn't been able to look at, much less touch in order to dispose of, were among those recalled.

So I was able to save my dog from kennel cough and take wonderful care of her over her lifetime, having her teeth cleaned regularly, having her vaccinated, giving her high quality vitamins, medications and food, using the best shampoos and conditioners, grooming her regularly, having her spayed, licensed, microchipped, taking her to obedience classes, walking her, taking her to dog parks, playing with her and lavishing all my love, loyalty and devotion on her. But I couldn't save her from a U.S. company that claims the dog treats are made in this country when in reality they are made in China or a governmental agency that didn't make a complete list of recalled products available earlier.

But you, you gave your dog to a rescue because it had health issues? What I wouldn't give to have my girl back along with any health issues!

I cannot fathom why someone would buy a dog and then give it up because it had health issues. Poor Snickers. You missed out when you gave her up. But I'm sure she's better off now because she's probably with a family who loves her unconditionally, health issues and all.

I have another golden retriever, adopted from rescue, not like my first golden but still a wonderful girl despite her health problems. But you know what? With the necessary medication to treat her health issues, she is doing very well. She is obedient, loving, loyal, protective, playful, devoted, intelligent and happy. I adore her, as do my family members, neighbors and friends. The world would be a very empty place without her.

When it comes to buying a dog or a cat from a pet store, I think people should instead consider adopting from a rescue group, a no kill shelter, the Humane Society or the ASPCA. Anyone considering a specific breed should research what health problems to which the breed might be predisposed in order to make a more informed decision.
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#4 Consumer Comment

Dog bought there had health issues too, but these are very common ...

AUTHOR: Sick_of_liars_&_cheats - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, November 08, 2008
As someone who bought a gorgeous 3-month-old golden retriever puppy from the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom in 1995, I was surprised to learn she had kennel cough when I took her to the vet for a check-up.

However, after speaking not only with two veterinarians but also with an aunt considered an authority on Doberman Pinschers, having spent more than two decades breeding and raising AKC-registered dog show award-winning Dobermans and listed annually in the Doberman Pinscher Club of America Member's Resource Directory, I learned that kennel cough is a very common respiratory infections in dogs.

Like the common cold spreads among humans, kennel cough, which is highly contagious, spreads among dogs. Just as a cold is more likely to spread among people who are in close contact with one another inside an office building, kennel cough is more likely to spread among dogs in close contact with one another in enclosed areas such as kennels, animal shelters, and dog day care facilities.

I had my golden girl treated and she was fine after that. I never considered asking the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom to reimburse me for the expense. That would be like insisting a hospital reimburse me for the cost of a visit to the pediatrician to find that the 3-day-old baby I just brought home has a cold.

Even if my golden had been diagnosed with more health problems, why would I blame the pet store? Evidence points to the fact that that while the majority of pet stores do deal with puppy mills, they don't knowingly do so. I feel that the responsibility lies with the U.S. government, which advised farmers to begin breeding dogs for profit in the 1960s.

Health problems in dogs are hereditary/congenital or acquired through injury or environmental conditions. Poor genetic health is often perpetuated by amateur breeders and puppy mills breeding dogs without screening the parents. Responsible breeders devote a great deal of time and resources to trying to eradicate genetic diseases in their lines, although this is difficult because the same selective breeding used to magnify desirable traits increases the chances of genetic illnesses in purebred dogs. Genetic conditions can lead to health problems including allergies, eye diseases, musculoskeletal disorders such as hip dysplasia, heart disease, endocrine disorders, blood disorders, hearing disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, kidney diseases, epilepsy, respiratory disorders, and autoimmune diseases.

Even if my dog had been diagnosed with other health issues, I never thought of turning her over to rescue, and I don't understand why you made such a decision. If you loved Snickers and spent so much money on a diagnosis and treatment, why would you give her up? Would you do the same to a human child?

I was forced to put my beloved golden purchased in 1995 from the Pet Pad down in 2007 not because of anything related to her being from a pet store but because she developed kidney failure, vomiting and other symptoms related to treats I had been feeding her that apparently contained melamine. Around the time she became sick, there had been quite a bit of publicity and stories on pet foods being recalled, and some newspapers and websites had lists of foods recalled, but apparently the lists distributed at that time did not include every recalled product. Had the vets I taken her to known or had I known, they might have been able to test her for the chemical and take steps to save her.

But all I could do, besides take her to one vet after another, was helplessly watch as three months passed without my beloved girl getting any better. No food or beverage, no medication, nothing prescribed or advised by the vets was of any help, and my beloved girl grew sicker and weaker. I would cuddle her, and sob as I clung to her, holding her ever more tightly, trying to keep her with me, trying to will her well, trying desperately to soothe her each time after lifting her thin little body up from the ground or the floor from where she had collapsed, depleted, in her own vomit.

I spent more than $7,000 trying to save her, trying to get a diagnosis, a treatment. It wasn't until weeks later when I saw the treats I had given my baby, my dearest friend and companion, the love of my life, listed among hundreds of other recalled food and treats that I realized what had happened. The list, available through an FDA link, featured product codes that, when I checked the bags of treats I hadn't been able to look at, much less touch in order to dispose of, were among those recalled.

So I was able to save my dog from kennel cough and take wonderful care of her over her lifetime, having her teeth cleaned regularly, having her vaccinated, giving her high quality vitamins, medications and food, using the best shampoos and conditioners, grooming her regularly, having her spayed, licensed, microchipped, taking her to obedience classes, walking her, taking her to dog parks, playing with her and lavishing all my love, loyalty and devotion on her. But I couldn't save her from a U.S. company that claims the dog treats are made in this country when in reality they are made in China or a governmental agency that didn't make a complete list of recalled products available earlier.

But you, you gave your dog to a rescue because it had health issues? What I wouldn't give to have my girl back along with any health issues!

I cannot fathom why someone would buy a dog and then give it up because it had health issues. Poor Snickers. You missed out when you gave her up. But I'm sure she's better off now because she's probably with a family who loves her unconditionally, health issues and all.

I have another golden retriever, adopted from rescue, not like my first golden but still a wonderful girl despite her health problems. But you know what? With the necessary medication to treat her health issues, she is doing very well. She is obedient, loving, loyal, protective, playful, devoted, intelligent and happy. I adore her, as do my family members, neighbors and friends. The world would be a very empty place without her.

When it comes to buying a dog or a cat from a pet store, I think people should instead consider adopting from a rescue group, a no kill shelter, the Humane Society or the ASPCA. Anyone considering a specific breed should research what health problems to which the breed might be predisposed in order to make a more informed decision.
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#3 Consumer Comment

Dog bought there had health issues too, but these are very common ...

AUTHOR: Sick_of_liars_&_cheats - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, November 08, 2008
As someone who bought a gorgeous 3-month-old golden retriever puppy from the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom in 1995, I was surprised to learn she had kennel cough when I took her to the vet for a check-up.

However, after speaking not only with two veterinarians but also with an aunt considered an authority on Doberman Pinschers, having spent more than two decades breeding and raising AKC-registered dog show award-winning Dobermans and listed annually in the Doberman Pinscher Club of America Member's Resource Directory, I learned that kennel cough is a very common respiratory infections in dogs.

Like the common cold spreads among humans, kennel cough, which is highly contagious, spreads among dogs. Just as a cold is more likely to spread among people who are in close contact with one another inside an office building, kennel cough is more likely to spread among dogs in close contact with one another in enclosed areas such as kennels, animal shelters, and dog day care facilities.

I had my golden girl treated and she was fine after that. I never considered asking the Pet Pad/Animal Kingdom to reimburse me for the expense. That would be like insisting a hospital reimburse me for the cost of a visit to the pediatrician to find that the 3-day-old baby I just brought home has a cold.

Even if my golden had been diagnosed with more health problems, why would I blame the pet store? Evidence points to the fact that that while the majority of pet stores do deal with puppy mills, they don't knowingly do so. I feel that the responsibility lies with the U.S. government, which advised farmers to begin breeding dogs for profit in the 1960s.

Health problems in dogs are hereditary/congenital or acquired through injury or environmental conditions. Poor genetic health is often perpetuated by amateur breeders and puppy mills breeding dogs without screening the parents. Responsible breeders devote a great deal of time and resources to trying to eradicate genetic diseases in their lines, although this is difficult because the same selective breeding used to magnify desirable traits increases the chances of genetic illnesses in purebred dogs. Genetic conditions can lead to health problems including allergies, eye diseases, musculoskeletal disorders such as hip dysplasia, heart disease, endocrine disorders, blood disorders, hearing disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, kidney diseases, epilepsy, respiratory disorders, and autoimmune diseases.

Even if my dog had been diagnosed with other health issues, I never thought of turning her over to rescue, and I don't understand why you made such a decision. If you loved Snickers and spent so much money on a diagnosis and treatment, why would you give her up? Would you do the same to a human child?

I was forced to put my beloved golden purchased in 1995 from the Pet Pad down in 2007 not because of anything related to her being from a pet store but because she developed kidney failure, vomiting and other symptoms related to treats I had been feeding her that apparently contained melamine. Around the time she became sick, there had been quite a bit of publicity and stories on pet foods being recalled, and some newspapers and websites had lists of foods recalled, but apparently the lists distributed at that time did not include every recalled product. Had the vets I taken her to known or had I known, they might have been able to test her for the chemical and take steps to save her.

But all I could do, besides take her to one vet after another, was helplessly watch as three months passed without my beloved girl getting any better. No food or beverage, no medication, nothing prescribed or advised by the vets was of any help, and my beloved girl grew sicker and weaker. I would cuddle her, and sob as I clung to her, holding her ever more tightly, trying to keep her with me, trying to will her well, trying desperately to soothe her each time after lifting her thin little body up from the ground or the floor from where she had collapsed, depleted, in her own vomit.

I spent more than $7,000 trying to save her, trying to get a diagnosis, a treatment. It wasn't until weeks later when I saw the treats I had given my baby, my dearest friend and companion, the love of my life, listed among hundreds of other recalled food and treats that I realized what had happened. The list, available through an FDA link, featured product codes that, when I checked the bags of treats I hadn't been able to look at, much less touch in order to dispose of, were among those recalled.

So I was able to save my dog from kennel cough and take wonderful care of her over her lifetime, having her teeth cleaned regularly, having her vaccinated, giving her high quality vitamins, medications and food, using the best shampoos and conditioners, grooming her regularly, having her spayed, licensed, microchipped, taking her to obedience classes, walking her, taking her to dog parks, playing with her and lavishing all my love, loyalty and devotion on her. But I couldn't save her from a U.S. company that claims the dog treats are made in this country when in reality they are made in China or a governmental agency that didn't make a complete list of recalled products available earlier.

But you, you gave your dog to a rescue because it had health issues? What I wouldn't give to have my girl back along with any health issues!

I cannot fathom why someone would buy a dog and then give it up because it had health issues. Poor Snickers. You missed out when you gave her up. But I'm sure she's better off now because she's probably with a family who loves her unconditionally, health issues and all.

I have another golden retriever, adopted from rescue, not like my first golden but still a wonderful girl despite her health problems. But you know what? With the necessary medication to treat her health issues, she is doing very well. She is obedient, loving, loyal, protective, playful, devoted, intelligent and happy. I adore her, as do my family members, neighbors and friends. The world would be a very empty place without her.

When it comes to buying a dog or a cat from a pet store, I think people should instead consider adopting from a rescue group, a no kill shelter, the Humane Society or the ASPCA. Anyone considering a specific breed should research what health problems to which the breed might be predisposed in order to make a more informed decision.
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#2 Consumer Suggestion

Good for you, not for all

AUTHOR: Tim - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Thursday, August 26, 2004
Yeah, well, I purchased a Keeshound in 1987 from the very same (Metro Center) Pet Pad. His hip dysplasia was evident even as a young puppy. They provided no relief. Perhaps you were reimbursed (even for the animal, which I was not) because over the years they have changed their practices.

At that time, though, in researching the means by which their animals were bred, shipped, displayed and "cared for" horrors were revealed that has caused me over all these years to specifically make recommendations *against* them.

All that said, though, congratulations on being satisfied.
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#1 Author of original report

This Situation Has Been Satisfied!

AUTHOR: Jeffrey - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Thursday, August 26, 2004
I am the person that wrote the information. First of all, I would like to say thank you! CPI, Inc. has sent me a check for the medical money paid in behalf of Snickers.

I am totally satisfied with the outcome!
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