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Report: #172890

Complaint Review: Geek Squad - Best Buy - Deptford New Jersey

  • Submitted:
  • Updated:
  • Reported By: Haddonfield New Jersey
  • Geek Squad - Best Buy 1851 Deptford Center RD Deptford, New Jersey U.S.A.

Geek Squad - Best Buy geek squad irresponsible, erased my hard drive without consent ripoff Deptford New Jersey

*UPDATE Employee: You did give consent.

*Consumer Comment: um ...instead o fpartitions...

*UPDATE Employee: your fault

*Consumer Comment: BB/GS are to blame here

*Consumer Comment: Recovering data

*Consumer Comment: You self-proclaimed techies don't see the whole picture

*Consumer Comment: Geek Squad was negligent

*Consumer Suggestion: Do it yourself next time.

*Consumer Comment: WAIT a minute......

*Consumer Suggestion: A $99 USB drive keeps this from happening. Smaller ones start around $50. Cheap insurance for vital files.

*UPDATE Employee: CIA

*UPDATE Employee: It is ALWAYS a computer users responsibility to back up their own personal data.

*Consumer Comment: Standard Procedures

*Consumer Comment: Standard Procedures

*Consumer Comment: Standard Procedures

*Consumer Comment: Standard Procedures

*Consumer Comment: I hear ya Brian - lost it all to a power surge

*Consumer Comment: Lorraine, I appreciate consumers who make an honest effort to educate themselves...kudos to you.

*Consumer Comment: Note to Lorraine

*Consumer Suggestion: They told him it was gone

*Consumer Comment: there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

*Consumer Comment: there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

*Consumer Comment: there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

*Consumer Comment: there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

*Consumer Comment: Somethings wrong

*Consumer Comment: Somethings wrong

*Consumer Comment: Somethings wrong

*Consumer Comment: Somethings wrong

*Consumer Comment: Let's get real here

*Consumer Comment: Let's get real here

*Consumer Comment: Let's get real here

*Consumer Suggestion: Computer 101

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I took my computer to Best Buy in Deptford, NJ since I couldn't load windows XP. They were supposed to install the new version. They did it after a couple of weeks (!), but when I brought my computer home I realized that they erased my whole hard drive! I had years of work on that disk, and I couldn't make a backup before I took it to Best Buy since Windows wouldn't load. Nobody called me from Geek Squad to ask me if I need some files saved, although this is a regular procedure. Because someone from Geek Squad was lazy I lost all my work! So I took the computer back, stood in line for an hour, explained everything to the manager, and he said they would try to retrieve the data.

He said he would personally call me when they're done, but of course he lied, so I had to call in day in day out since I was approaching my finals and I really needed the computer. Finally, after two weeks it was done, they couldn't retrieve the data, and nobody offered me a discount or a refund. General Manager declined to talk to me since he "didn't understand computers!" I took the computer home, turned it on and now it wouldn't work at all!

I was really mad at this point and called Geek Squad costumer service, since I didn't want to drive out a half an hour to Deptford again, wait in line for another hour, so I asked if they could send someone to my house. They would, but ironically only if they charged me! This really upset me, but I took the computer back to the store the next day. After about ten days it was finally ready, the Geek Squad guy was very gloomy and wouldn't even apologize for all the grief they caused me. Best Buy customer service supposedly filed a grievance against the store, but Best Buy never heard obviously of customer service. Noone ever offered me a refund.

The computer did work for a few days, but then it crashed! So, $300 later, I was without computer, I lost all of my data and nobody from Geek Squad or Best Buy wouldn't do anything about it.

Do yourself a favor and don't trust Geek Squad. They will take your money, but never claim any responsibility for their actions.

Dusan
Haddonfield, New Jersey
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 01/23/2006 12:10 PM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/geek-squad-best-buy/deptford-new-jersey/geek-squad-best-buy-geek-squad-irresponsible-erased-my-hard-drive-without-consent-ripof-172890. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

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REBUTTALS & REPLIES:
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#32 UPDATE Employee

You did give consent.

AUTHOR: Bracus - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Friday, June 19, 2009
The paper you signed when you brought it in, says they are not responsible for data being lossed. Every store has that paper signed for every repair. This whole post is unnecessary.
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#31 Consumer Comment

um ...instead o fpartitions...

AUTHOR: Paul - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Wednesday, May 13, 2009
In my case, I have 5 computers.

Only a laptop and the main pc in my office even have serious storage.

All other pc's have 10-40 gig max...and use a server HD as the 'MY DOCUMENTS'.

My main pc even uses that server drive 'my documents' directly.

My laptop however does have its own my documents but I have a primary link to the server 'my documents' so I can get to that folder when its on the network..


ALL of the other 3 pc's have backup images saved to the server drive regularly..


All of this btw is easy to do by even a beginner, and in fact the person who assisted me on setting this up was 12 years old.

Ie; I was teaching him many things, and even at 12 is a computer wiz.


Backing up is critical anyway..

With the sole exception of the main pc, I will never ever lose any data.
Even the server drive is ok because its a mirrored hD.
Ie; Its a 2 terabyte server HD with 1 terabyt being used as a backup itself.

The main pc, is backed up in two ways.
Part of it is that is not 'my documents' is backed up on its own extra HD, though the biggest part of giant stuff is Server saved.


Reality, back it up, its worth the $$ in the end.

If I were to lose even just my financial data it would take months to rebuild a lot of it.... though I could get instantly setup and restarted on much.
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#30 UPDATE Employee

your fault

AUTHOR: Dane - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, March 14, 2009
When you check your computer in with Geek Squad you MUST sign a form stating that you understand that all your data may be lost, that you are responsible for having it backed up, and that Best Buy is not liable for data loss.if it took 2 weeks its because they had a lot of computers to work on. If you had been a responsible person and had backed up your data and then taken it in to them to reinstall XP you would be happy, your whole problem starts with you not backing up your important files, and you made it worse by not reading what you are signing.
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#29 Consumer Comment

BB/GS are to blame here

AUTHOR: Adam - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Thursday, March 05, 2009
In my shop, or any other with competent employees, this would've never happened. You ALWAYS assume that a person has data to be backed up, and verify before doing ANYTHING whether or not they want it saved.

@ Lorraine
The argument that "the OP couldn't get it to boot, so how could they?" is silly. The OP may not have had another machine to put the drive in as a secondary and copy the data from, but GS should. That should be the very first thing they did actually, as the problem may or may not have been fixable just by reconfiguring/recopying files (unless the problem was hardware/drive related).

Also, partitions make little difference if the drive itself fails. Installing applications to a partition other than the OSp is pointless, since if you reinstall the OS, the applications' registry entries are gone, rendering them useless anyway. While it's good to back up data files somewhere, using partitions to preserve them or programs is useless, and none safer than having them all on the same partition.

As for GS themselves, I get more machines in my shop WITH their service tag on it than without one. Just today actually I got one in where they had stuck the nozzle of an air can into the fan WHILE IT WAS RUNNING to "clean it" (reversing fan direction while it's on, awesome), and were shocked when it didn't fix the customer's BSODs. They proceeded to charge something like $180 to reinstall Vista (about a 15 minute job), and neglected to install ANY device drivers other than running her printer disc that she brought them. No VGA, no WiFi, no drivers or updates whatsoever.

Exchanging one problem for another is not the same as "fixing".
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#28 Consumer Comment

Recovering data

AUTHOR: Chuck - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Friday, January 05, 2007
I just wanted to tell you that Brian was correct when he stated that even if your OS will not boot up it DOES NOT mean that your data is gone.

If your OS doesn't boot all it means that some part of your OS has been damaged.

With Windows XP there are methods you can use to recover your OS but they are too lengthy to go into here.

One thing with XP that can make your files harder to get to is that XP uses the NTFS file system and only other OS's with NTFS or linux based filing systems will be able to reach these files.

And even if you start with a fresh install of XP on the same partition that was ariginally on and try to reach your files you might get an "Access Denied" message.

You can recover your files after a crash by using linux based OS called "KNOPPIX" What makes this useful is this OS runs completely from a CD. It does not have to be installed on your hard drive. All you have to do is put the CD it your CD drive and reboot your computer and your computer will start the disk and the KNOPPIX OS will start and run on your computer just as if it was installed on your hard drive.

With this you can look at and transfer your files from one drive to another.

Bust of all it's free for download or you can get it on disk for a few dollars. You can find it and other linux based OS's at http://distrowatch.com or at http://knoppix.net
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#27 Consumer Comment

You self-proclaimed techies don't see the whole picture

AUTHOR: Curt - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, December 31, 2006
Half say the files are gone forever, half say they're still there and can be recovered. Some say partition the drive, some say back to an external drive. Everyone sees only one little piece of the picture and insist that piece is the gospel truth.

When you install Windows, it doesn't necessarily wipe out what was there. I've done many, many upgrades from Windows NT to 2000 and from Windows 98 to XP without losing a single file or having to reinstall a single application.

If you do a fresh install instead of an upgrade, Windows reformats the drive. Reformatting doesn't remove any data; it just marks the disk space as available. Same as when you delete a file, the data are still, it's just had its space marked as available for use by another file. Then when you install Windows or write any files to the disk, it writes the new data to the space that got marked available -- THAT is when the old data actually gets deleted. So the old data may or may not be there, depending on whether or not the space it occupied has had new stuff written to it. If data from the old files is still there it can be recovered. The longer you go of course, the more new stuff gets written to the disk, and the more of the old data is gone forever.

Yes, you should always do backups. As the OP found out the hard way, computers can die unexpectedly and any time. FWIW, I set up an atomated Windows task to do daily system backups, and a FreeBSD cron job copies the daily backup file to a network server. Less-geeky types could just get a cheap USB drive and use Windows Explorer to copy their important stuff to it regularly.

And no, a non-bootable machine shouldn't have been a problem for Best Buy. As others have noted, it's easy for a techie type to boot from a different drive and recover all the data. OP probably signed a repair order that said in the fine print that they aren't responsible for lost data, but Best Buy still should have made it crystal clear to the OP that this could happen.

OP - you should still run a data recovery program and see if anything can still be restored - but don't get your hopes up too much.
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#26 Consumer Comment

Geek Squad was negligent

AUTHOR: Marc - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, December 31, 2006
To everyone who has posted here, the consumer was not at fault. People take their computers to an expert to get expert service. Not everyone understands the concept of partisions, data lost, and so forth. If they did, there would be no Geek Squad. Everyone can't be an expert in everything. When you take your car to a mechanic, you expect the mechanic to know what they are doing.

To imply that the customer is responsible for backing up his/her computer is not even the point here.

First of all, it is extremely rare that data can't be pulled off the hard drive.

Second, The computer should have had the hard drive mirrored prior to servicing by the technician. This is how circuit city, fry's, micro center and so on do it. I would bet my a*s that it is actually in a manual at Best Buy to do this. By the way, customer sigiture should be required before they delete the hard drive.
There is actually specialized software and hardware to do this. I personally have seen them do this at circuit city when I took my computer in a couple years ago.

Third, the technician should have explained before working on the computer the potential to loose data, even though very rare when the technision knows what they are doing.

My guess would be that Best Buy has some employees that do not have the required experience to work on computers. Take the drive somewhere else and have them look at it.

Also, ask for a refund from Best Buy. If they refuse, try to email the ceo, or call the ceo. You can usually find the information on their website under investor relations. Just remember, the internet is a beutiful thing, and no longer can CEO's hide behind their desk.
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#25 Consumer Suggestion

Do it yourself next time.

AUTHOR: Richard - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Wednesday, December 27, 2006
I have been building my own computers since 1991. I trust myself better than some "professional".
Always back up your important data. An external hard drive is great for this, and they are cheap now. Another backup to an external site is even better. In case of something catastrophic, you will still have the data.
I also always have two physical hard drives rather than one that is partitioned.
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#24 Consumer Comment

WAIT a minute......

AUTHOR: Randy - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, December 26, 2006
I owned a gateway computer for less than a year. my house burned up. They whole place was either water damaged or just ashes. My gateway, in a back room away from the actual fire, sustained 1000+ temps for about 30 mins. (the stupid fire department got lost) The gateway was melted halfway to the desk. My whole life's pictures was on that thing, and the CD back ups? They where melted right next to the machine. Boo h*o to me right?

Wrong. I took the computer to a REAL professional to get my pictures off the melted hard drive. For $88.oo he removed my hard drive, hooked it up to a "reader" and moved all my pictures and files to a DVD.

I have had a LOT of "Crashed" hard drives,and never lost anything! Take your computer to a REAL computer expert. The Geek squad (at least on the phone) is a bunch of script readers. AVOID THEM>
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#23 Consumer Suggestion

A $99 USB drive keeps this from happening. Smaller ones start around $50. Cheap insurance for vital files.

AUTHOR: Paul - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, December 16, 2006
Search: external hard drive.

For $50, you get 5 gig of backup. That's more than the whole XP operating system uses. Plenty of room for most of your important files.

These things are no-brainers. USB plug-ins. Insert the plug, and start copying.

Now, I have terabytes of info stored. Call me Mr archive. I use site-rippers and download managers, so obviously it all won't fit on some micro-drive.

But, you can be sure all my important data files are backed up in 3 locations, just to be extra-safe.

Hell, a $25 USB flash drive will give you a gig of backup, and those little things fit on key chains.

Clearly, backing up is the only prudent way to go here.
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#22 UPDATE Employee

CIA

AUTHOR: Richard - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, December 16, 2006
Mistake one... The Agents that took in the HDD should have asked about any information that may remain on the HDD but also the consumer should have mentioned that as well.

Secondly.... Never start an OS install without proper backup. For someone to retreave from a HDD without an OS may be trying because of any exsisting passwords. If there is a password on the account, then someone will be locked out. You can try to move the platers to a new HDD and everything but that information is stuck there till the password is removed or set in.

I am an Agent in a different store. Most of us know a lot about computers and that's why we have the jobs but there are some that are unaware of business proceedure, that precinct should have been better trained maybe but right now, the information is lost and there isn't much a soul can do to get it back. Sorry for the mistake made but I do believe both sides are to blame.
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#21 UPDATE Employee

It is ALWAYS a computer users responsibility to back up their own personal data.

AUTHOR: Blair - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Saturday, April 15, 2006
Dear John

Have you ever had a dissatisfied customer John?

Your procedures mimic those already written in stone by Best Buy's Geek Squad.

It is ALWAYS a computer users responsibility to back up their own personal data. Do Geek Squad standard procedures require agents to offer data back-ups and recoveries? Yes; every time, no exceptions.

Are there a few bad eggs out there? Probably.
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#20 Consumer Comment

Standard Procedures

AUTHOR: John - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, March 12, 2006
I own a consulting firm in NJ area and have many customers who have told me the horror stories about Geek Squad. I'm not here to bash any one, I'm only going to explain a few things on standard procedure when some one brings in the computer system that requires work like this.
1- Some one mentioned that if his system crashed data can not be accessed, that is wrong. We retreive data from formated hard drives, pen drives etc.
2-When some one brings in their computer we ask them if any data needs to be saved.
3-If they say no or yes either way we make sure that they sign a disclaimer.
4-If we forget to ask, we call them back again and ask it. Nothing gets done unless it is in writting and signed and agreed by the customer.

Just to let you know depending on your hard drive situation your data still can be retreived. Certainly not by Best Buy or Geek Squad, but a Professional Computer Company.
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#19 Consumer Comment

Standard Procedures

AUTHOR: John - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, March 12, 2006
I own a consulting firm in NJ area and have many customers who have told me the horror stories about Geek Squad. I'm not here to bash any one, I'm only going to explain a few things on standard procedure when some one brings in the computer system that requires work like this.
1- Some one mentioned that if his system crashed data can not be accessed, that is wrong. We retreive data from formated hard drives, pen drives etc.
2-When some one brings in their computer we ask them if any data needs to be saved.
3-If they say no or yes either way we make sure that they sign a disclaimer.
4-If we forget to ask, we call them back again and ask it. Nothing gets done unless it is in writting and signed and agreed by the customer.

Just to let you know depending on your hard drive situation your data still can be retreived. Certainly not by Best Buy or Geek Squad, but a Professional Computer Company.
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#18 Consumer Comment

Standard Procedures

AUTHOR: John - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, March 12, 2006
I own a consulting firm in NJ area and have many customers who have told me the horror stories about Geek Squad. I'm not here to bash any one, I'm only going to explain a few things on standard procedure when some one brings in the computer system that requires work like this.
1- Some one mentioned that if his system crashed data can not be accessed, that is wrong. We retreive data from formated hard drives, pen drives etc.
2-When some one brings in their computer we ask them if any data needs to be saved.
3-If they say no or yes either way we make sure that they sign a disclaimer.
4-If we forget to ask, we call them back again and ask it. Nothing gets done unless it is in writting and signed and agreed by the customer.

Just to let you know depending on your hard drive situation your data still can be retreived. Certainly not by Best Buy or Geek Squad, but a Professional Computer Company.
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#17 Consumer Comment

Standard Procedures

AUTHOR: John - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Sunday, March 12, 2006
I own a consulting firm in NJ area and have many customers who have told me the horror stories about Geek Squad. I'm not here to bash any one, I'm only going to explain a few things on standard procedure when some one brings in the computer system that requires work like this.
1- Some one mentioned that if his system crashed data can not be accessed, that is wrong. We retreive data from formated hard drives, pen drives etc.
2-When some one brings in their computer we ask them if any data needs to be saved.
3-If they say no or yes either way we make sure that they sign a disclaimer.
4-If we forget to ask, we call them back again and ask it. Nothing gets done unless it is in writting and signed and agreed by the customer.

Just to let you know depending on your hard drive situation your data still can be retreived. Certainly not by Best Buy or Geek Squad, but a Professional Computer Company.
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#16 Consumer Comment

I hear ya Brian - lost it all to a power surge

AUTHOR: Lorraine - Geek Consumer Advocate :-) - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Wednesday, January 25, 2006
I've lost it all to a power surge here where I live shortly after we moved in a couple years ago. Yep, I had a strip, didn't help, power supply, MB and CPU were fried. Some online friends got together and bought me the parts I needed to rebuild since we rarely have any extra money to do that. For me to get SSI, we have a limit on gross income per month, so can't go over it and that prevents us from getting the normal things most take for granted in their lives.

Been online 13 years now. When you can't afford a car, so are homebound, a computer and the net is a lifesaver. It's my way out to the world. I detest software for the most part, but adore hardware. I do hardware, hubby does software. (Yes, there IS a joke there!)

The only prob I really have with windows is when I get fustrated I can't simply type rm -rf * and resolve the problem. :) That should tell you where my heart lies, but when you marry a windows weenie, you learn other OS's and survive. Still keep a shell on a BSD box an ISP friend stuck on his T line for me to play in so I don't forget it all as time passes.

The newer or average users don't know about slave drives or even partitioning the single drive they get in the computer they buy. I try to tell them about partitioning, so at least they can try to protect data by sticking it on another drive partition if they can't afford a slave. Right now I'm on one drive, only due to not enough funds to buy another drive to use as a slave. That will be saved up for and by next year I'll be able to get one. We did find a DVD RW on sale recently, so at least now I can back up the files I want to keep on DVD's and won't have to bug my ex boyfriend for copies of pics if I crash again and lose all the partitions. LOL.

No need to worry about hurting my feelings. I have pretty thick skin. Cup of coffee and a few hours of brain picking would be fun though so I could learn more from you. Heh, maybe we should start harassing ..err.. I mean .. suggesting to the EDitor to set up a coffee clutch one day for all of us in the Phoenix area to get together and meet in person. I think a ROR party would be fun!

Almost 4 am here .. my bed is calling my name. I'm sure we'll meet up again on some of the computer reports in here. Have a good one!
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#15 Consumer Comment

Lorraine, I appreciate consumers who make an honest effort to educate themselves...kudos to you.

AUTHOR: Brian - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
Perhaps I was a little harsh in my initial response.

My response was specific to the first time the computer was taken in. Before they did a full system reload they should have done a backup or at least called the customer. At that point there was a very real chance the data (as in My Documents, etc) was still intact. But instead they did a format and reload (from what I gather).

Then, on the second trip they said they couldn't get the data. However I will say, in the end, the liability is with the consumer. It's their job to make sure they have backups. But I'm also sympathetic when somebody loses data. It can be disasterous.
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#14 Consumer Comment

Note to Lorraine

AUTHOR: Ken - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
While your heart is certainly in the right place, it is important to note that if your disk has a 'hard crash' it won't help you to have partitions, since all the partitions are on the same physical device, and if that device is hosed, so are ALL the partitons.

Backups are really important, even for a casual user. (think about all the photos you may have). For more than the casual user, a better investment is a second physical drive, and if you are even savvier, set up mirroring. If not, use it as your data drive. Drives are way too cheap these days to risk losing any data.
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#13 Consumer Suggestion

They told him it was gone

AUTHOR: Lorraine - Geek Consumer Advocate :-) - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
He said in his OP that they couldn't retrieve his data, Brian. That is what I was referring to. Sorry if I wasn't clear enough, teaches me to do 10 things at once when posting. I'm more than aware data can be retrieved from drives, but it was not to be in this case. Read what he said again and you will understand why I said what I did.

I still ask my original question. If he's not backing up his data, why isn't he at least using a partitioned drive and installing his programs on D, E, F, whatever? I know some programs do insist on being placed on C drive only and you have to protect your data from them, although I normally try to find a similar program that will allow an install to another partition. Windows is notorious for crashing and if you keep important files on your computer, you MUST keep it backed up someplace else, other than your C drive.

I'm not saying I'm a pro, I'm a housewife who maintains a home network and I pass on knowledge learned to others if I can, but it's obvious to us both this 'geek' from Best Buy did not do his job. Even on a slow drive with little RAM, you can install XP in about 2 hours. Took me about a half hour to install XP Pro on my new 160 gig drive a month ago. 2 weeks for a reinstall is just outrageous by any standards.

The cost seems out of line to me too, but I've built and maintained my own for the past 8 years, so am not up to date on what labor costs are these days. If you do this for a living, then maybe you can give him an idea of the cost in other retail places.
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#12 Consumer Comment

there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
I agree with Brian

And as to go as far saying you cannot retrieve the data lost? there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data. The next point would be in the agreement with the Geek squad did you sign an agreement that said they would be able to reformat the hard drive? if not their fault and make them pay the 1000 to 2000 to retrieve the lost data.. The moral always backup data you just never know..
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#11 Consumer Comment

there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
I agree with Brian

And as to go as far saying you cannot retrieve the data lost? there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data. The next point would be in the agreement with the Geek squad did you sign an agreement that said they would be able to reformat the hard drive? if not their fault and make them pay the 1000 to 2000 to retrieve the lost data.. The moral always backup data you just never know..
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#10 Consumer Comment

there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
I agree with Brian

And as to go as far saying you cannot retrieve the data lost? there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data. The next point would be in the agreement with the Geek squad did you sign an agreement that said they would be able to reformat the hard drive? if not their fault and make them pay the 1000 to 2000 to retrieve the lost data.. The moral always backup data you just never know..
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#9 Consumer Comment

there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data

AUTHOR: Mike - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, January 24, 2006
I agree with Brian

And as to go as far saying you cannot retrieve the data lost? there are programs out there for nothing on the net that will retrieve lost data. The next point would be in the agreement with the Geek squad did you sign an agreement that said they would be able to reformat the hard drive? if not their fault and make them pay the 1000 to 2000 to retrieve the lost data.. The moral always backup data you just never know..
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#8 Consumer Comment

Somethings wrong

AUTHOR: Brian - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
First of all, the responder that said if the computer wouldn't boot, then the data was already gone. Thats bulls*it. You can whack your OS and make it unbootable and still have the data intact. It's always easy to tell the casual home users from the experienced pros.

Secondly, I do a full image of every computer I work on. It's just good, responsible business. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that most computer users have valuable files on them! I have had people call me a month after service and ask for a copy of a file because they lost it or can't find it...and I am able to give it to them.
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#7 Consumer Comment

Somethings wrong

AUTHOR: Brian - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
First of all, the responder that said if the computer wouldn't boot, then the data was already gone. Thats bulls*it. You can whack your OS and make it unbootable and still have the data intact. It's always easy to tell the casual home users from the experienced pros.

Secondly, I do a full image of every computer I work on. It's just good, responsible business. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that most computer users have valuable files on them! I have had people call me a month after service and ask for a copy of a file because they lost it or can't find it...and I am able to give it to them.
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#6 Consumer Comment

Somethings wrong

AUTHOR: Brian - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
First of all, the responder that said if the computer wouldn't boot, then the data was already gone. Thats bulls*it. You can whack your OS and make it unbootable and still have the data intact. It's always easy to tell the casual home users from the experienced pros.

Secondly, I do a full image of every computer I work on. It's just good, responsible business. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that most computer users have valuable files on them! I have had people call me a month after service and ask for a copy of a file because they lost it or can't find it...and I am able to give it to them.
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#5 Consumer Comment

Somethings wrong

AUTHOR: Brian - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
First of all, the responder that said if the computer wouldn't boot, then the data was already gone. Thats bulls*it. You can whack your OS and make it unbootable and still have the data intact. It's always easy to tell the casual home users from the experienced pros.

Secondly, I do a full image of every computer I work on. It's just good, responsible business. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that most computer users have valuable files on them! I have had people call me a month after service and ask for a copy of a file because they lost it or can't find it...and I am able to give it to them.
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#4 Consumer Comment

Let's get real here

AUTHOR: Dave - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
You are at fault, period. You didn't tell them NOT to erase your hard drive. You never made a backup. You had 'years' of work on it with NO BACKUP?

Please. There's no one to blame but you. Deal with it, and get a new computer. Sounds like yours is a POS anyway.
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#3 Consumer Comment

Let's get real here

AUTHOR: Dave - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
You are at fault, period. You didn't tell them NOT to erase your hard drive. You never made a backup. You had 'years' of work on it with NO BACKUP?

Please. There's no one to blame but you. Deal with it, and get a new computer. Sounds like yours is a POS anyway.
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#2 Consumer Comment

Let's get real here

AUTHOR: Dave - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
You are at fault, period. You didn't tell them NOT to erase your hard drive. You never made a backup. You had 'years' of work on it with NO BACKUP?

Please. There's no one to blame but you. Deal with it, and get a new computer. Sounds like yours is a POS anyway.
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#1 Consumer Suggestion

Computer 101

AUTHOR: Lorraine - Geek Consumer Advocate :-) - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Monday, January 23, 2006
Let me say first off I'm no fan of any of the big computer chain stores. This is the reason I studied up and learned to build and maintain my little home network of 3 computers.

From what you said in your report, your computer crashed and you couldn't get it to boot up. If you couldn't get it to boot, how do you expect them to? Your files were already gone at that point and the only option was to reinstall Win XP which refomats the C partition of your hard drive as it installs.

I have to ask, why aren't you running a partitioned drive and keeping all your programs and files on other partitions on the drive? Doing that ensures when Windows crashes, you will only lose the OS itself, not any of your programs. I never put anything but Windows XP on my C drive. Programs, pictures, games, etc. all go on D, E or F drives. I have yet to lose anything except XP if I crash.

I may not agree with the way Best Buy does business, but I don't see where you were ripped off in this case. Learn to install XP yourself and partition your hard drive. It's very easy to do and XP walks you thru it all. If you experience another crash in the future, you won't lose anything then.
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