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Report: #319318

Complaint Review: Penn Credit Corporation - Harrisburg Pennsylvania

  • Submitted:
  • Updated:
  • Reported By: San Diego California
  • Author Confirmed What's this?
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  • Penn Credit Corporation 916 South 14th Street Harrisburg, Pennsylvania U.S.A.

Penn Credit Corporation Calling & Harrassing me about twice a week for weeks now! Harrisburg Pennsylvania

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: The common situation

*UPDATE EX-employee responds: The common situation

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This company has been calling and harrassing me for a couple months now. They always call after 5 pm and leave an automated voice message saying that they are "Calling about important personal business" and to "Please call back." They NEVER mention which company it is.

I have never called them back until today when I decided to call from my office, so they couldn't track me. They person that answered the phone didn't even state his company, so I asked which company this is. He told me "Penn Credit Corporation" and asked if I received a phone call or a letter. I hung up.

I'm not sure why they are calling me, considering I don't have any debt. Any suggestions?

Ang
San Diego, California
U.S.A.

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 03/19/2008 10:31 AM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/penn-credit-corporation/harrisburg-pennsylvania-17104/penn-credit-corporation-calling-harrassing-me-about-twice-a-week-for-weeks-now-harrisbu-319318. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

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#2 UPDATE EX-employee responds

The common situation

AUTHOR: Mxxg - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, March 31, 2009

As a former employee I can honestly state that hanging up will do no good.

My advice? Call and see what debt it is that they're claiming you owe. As sketchy as it sounds, many folks out there commonly don't know what the FDCPA requires of collectors. For example, when receiving inbound calls, representitives at Penn Credit aren't allowed to actually state the name of the company unless specifically asked (the reasoning is because, technically speaking, anyone can call on behalf of another individual and giving the name of the collection agency immediately informs the other person it's of a debt related nature). When the representitive asks whether you've received a letter or phone calls it's simply to find out which method of search to use - if you've received a letter they'll ask you for an ID number while a phone call would trigger a search by number.

With that said and done, I would most definately recommend to call back and find out more information. You may think you have no debt, however there is always that chance of fraud. Or a chance you simply don't remember. Or it could be as simple as a wrong number. Either way ignoring the situation is not the best choice. Call back and ask what account they're referring to- if you still don't remember, request verification in -written- form, sent via certified mail. (I cannot stress how important it is to place the request in writing.. not all collectors are created equally!)

And as I said in the other complaint, if you get a nasty collector, don't stoop to her level: simply ask for her collector ID and ask for a supervisor. And if the supervisor is nasty? Ask for the manager. And when all else fails, put your complaint in writing along with the verification request. ALWAYS ASK FOR COLLECTOR ID NUMBERS.

Remember: depending on what state you're living in and what type of account that is under your name, the debt could eventually get transferred over to a law firm in the future which leads to all sorts of icky situations. Ignoring things only leads to further aggravation and stress.

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#1 UPDATE EX-employee responds

The common situation

AUTHOR: Mxxg - (U.S.A.)

POSTED: Tuesday, March 31, 2009

As a former employee I can honestly state that hanging up will do no good.

My advice? Call and see what debt it is that they're claiming you owe. As sketchy as it sounds, many folks out there commonly don't know what the FDCPA requires of collectors. For example, when receiving inbound calls, representitives at Penn Credit aren't allowed to actually state the name of the company unless specifically asked (the reasoning is because, technically speaking, anyone can call on behalf of another individual and giving the name of the collection agency immediately informs the other person it's of a debt related nature). When the representitive asks whether you've received a letter or phone calls it's simply to find out which method of search to use - if you've received a letter they'll ask you for an ID number while a phone call would trigger a search by number.

With that said and done, I would most definately recommend to call back and find out more information. You may think you have no debt, however there is always that chance of fraud. Or a chance you simply don't remember. Or it could be as simple as a wrong number. Either way ignoring the situation is not the best choice. Call back and ask what account they're referring to- if you still don't remember, request verification in -written- form, sent via certified mail. (I cannot stress how important it is to place the request in writing.. not all collectors are created equally!)

And as I said in the other complaint, if you get a nasty collector, don't stoop to her level: simply ask for her collector ID and ask for a supervisor. And if the supervisor is nasty? Ask for the manager. And when all else fails, put your complaint in writing along with the verification request. ALWAYS ASK FOR COLLECTOR ID NUMBERS.

Remember: depending on what state you're living in and what type of account that is under your name, the debt could eventually get transferred over to a law firm in the future which leads to all sorts of icky situations. Ignoring things only leads to further aggravation and stress.

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