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Report: #1505514

Complaint Review: Brickell Luxury Motors BLM - Miami Florida

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  • Reported By: Omar J — Miami Florida United States
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  • Brickell Luxury Motors BLM 590 SW 8th Street Miami , Florida United States

Brickell Luxury Motors BLM Ashley Sanchez Auto Dealer Selling wrongly advertised Damaged Vehicles For Above Average Prices. Miami Florida

*Consumer Comment: Buyer's Remorse..

*Author of original report: Brickell Luxury Motors BLM Auto Dealer Selling wrongly advertised Damaged Vehicles For Above Average Prices. Miami Florida

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I found a Tesla available for sale at Brickell Luxury Motors, Miami. When I contacted the dealer, a representative by the name of Ashley Sanchez responded to my email. I made arrangements to go into the dealership within a few hours for a test drive with the intention to purchase the vehicle on the spot.

Walked into the dealership with a $60K Pre-Approval. After a lot of time of small talk with a nice sales rep, and waiting for the manager to become available, I managed to make an official offer for the advertised vehicle.

It is important to understand this dealership's predatory practices...The BLM dealership advertised a "2018 Tesla Model 3" online and on their window stickers as a "Long Range" Battery vehicle when in reality it is a "Mid-Range" battery vehicle, meaning the dealership falsely advertised this vehicle in order to increase the price, lying to potential customers and potentially stealing thousands of dollars from unwitting customers. When this obvious fact was pointed out to the sales rep and manager, this was taken into account and mention this would be reported to the dealership manager who would then say that this was a standard problem on the computer software and was not able to rectify this on their listing to reflect actual car facts or give any price reduction due to this particular fact. 





The vehicle's CarFax indicates it is a 2018 Tesla Model 3, with no previous accident history, as indicated on the vehicle's CarFax was purchased at a Car Auction in New York by Brickell Luxury Motors. Upon initial inspection, the vehicle had visible damage to the front bumper, with a crease in the center of the bumper indicating previous damage, and a "cap" was also damaged on the front bumper as per photos taken. This noticeable damage to the front bumper, confirms previous damage to the vehicle which was omitted from the CarFax report. When questioned about this obvious fact, the sales rep said "many cars are purchased at auctions" and acted as if they had no idea about the vehicle in general, saying "we don't have these type of electric vehicles available often". There was also very visible unprofessional repair to a crack in the center of the front bumper, which seemed to have been patched over by some type of un-aesthetic repair, leaving a noticeable mark on the middle of the bumper. This again indicated the vehicle has been involved in some sort of unreported previous accident or unreported repaired damage, as the vehicle's CarFax indicated no previous damage.

I do not see why a luxury dealership of such caliber, with at least 1.5 million dollars worth of luxury inventory on their lot, would allow having a damaged vehicle displayed on their lot for sale at top price.





After overcoming these shortcomings and receiving reassurance from the dealer the defects on the front bumper would be repaired prior to delivery. 

I offered 20% down, on an overpriced previously damaged vehicle. I submitted a handwritten offer of $36,000 out the door for the vehicle, which was presented to the manager by the sales rep, after several minutes, the manager called us into the office and now had $37,000 written over the original $36,000 offer. You would think that when a dealership manager sees the term "Out The Door", written with on an offer, they recognize this is a standard industry term used to describe the total price of the vehicle including all taxes, dealer fees, and registrations/ transfer fees. So no further fees or value is added to this final offer agreed.

After going through the entire process, I indicated I would put down approx 20% of the total vehicle cost, and the rest would be financed, the financing was approved and a credit full check was pulled on my credit record, each Credit inquiry on a personal credit record has a direct impact on the score of the persons' long term credit record.

When the final steps of the sales and financing process came, even though I had put down $7k on a $37,000 agreed out the door price for this vehicle, the dealership still went ahead and added the extra dealer fees and tax on top of the already agreed "Out the Door" Price. They did not seem to understand we had already made a handshake agreement for the total price of the vehicle at $37,000 and proceeded to present me with a final offer over $42,000 all in. This completely blind-sighted me as we had already gone through extensive negotiations with multiple levels of staff over multiple hours.

This obviously became a serious problem when the dealership manager proceeded to give me a presentation on why the price had suddenly increased from the agreed $37,000 out the door to now almost $43,000 out the door. meaning an increase of $6,000 previously not discussed, presented at the very last minute. This kind of gave me a very hard decision to make, either accept the sudden increase or abandon what seemed like fruitful negotiations that had gone on to this point on a vehicle I was still considering after the initial issues, not to mention an impact on my long-term credit profile. It suddenly seemed as if the dealership did not have my best interest in mind.

In "Good Faith" negotiations, dealers must disclose all previously known vehicle history and report any unknown visible prior damage, especially businesses of this high caliber that uses the word "Luxury" in their name, one would expect more, however, it seems like Brickell Luxury Motors resorts to the same predatory practices, lying and deceiving clients like other bad actors in this industry. This was definitely not a "Luxury Experience".

If this dealership is willing to buy such vehicles at Auction from other States, and retail them damaged for full price, imagine what they may be doing with the high-value Luxury Cars you may want to purchase from this dealership. Imagine going through this type of experience with your next $150,000 vehicle purchase from BLM. Bad Experience, save yourself the hassle. Buyer Beware. Be Very Careful. 

This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 02/26/2021 12:55 AM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/report/brickell-luxury-motors-blm/miami-florida-ashley-sanchez-1505514. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

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#2 Consumer Comment

Buyer's Remorse..

AUTHOR: Robert - (United States)

POSTED: Saturday, February 27, 2021

This is nothing more than a case of Buyer's Remorse. You had numerous opportunities to just get up and walk away. For most people, if they tried to sell a "Mid Range" battery as "Long Range" and refuse to adjust the price, they would have walked away. But not you. Instead at every step and additional issue you found, you continued with the sale and making offers on this "overpriced" and "damaged" car.

You say that they somehow were supposed to disclose "damage", when per your own narrative the CarFax report showed no previous damage, and apparently the damage that was there wasn't hidden.

If you bought the car, then the only RipOff here appears to be the one you did to yourself.   If you didn't buy it, perhaps you can use this experience to be more selective. 

With a 60K approval even with limited inventory you pretty much could have your pick of dozens of different vehicles for sale.  

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#1 Author of original report

Brickell Luxury Motors BLM Auto Dealer Selling wrongly advertised Damaged Vehicles For Above Average Prices. Miami Florida

AUTHOR: Omar - (United States)

POSTED: Friday, February 26, 2021

I found a Tesla available for sale at Brickell Luxury Motors, Miami. When I contacted the dealer, a representative responded to my email. I made arrangements to go into the dealership within a few hours for a test drive with the intention to purchase the vehicle on the spot.

Walked into the dealership with a $60K Pre-Approval. After a lot of time of small talk with a nice sales rep, and waiting for the manager to become available, I managed to make an official offer for the advertised vehicle.

It is important to understand this dealership's predatory practices...The BLM dealership advertised a "2018 Tesla Model 3" online and on their window stickers as a "Long Range" Battery vehicle when in reality it is a "Mid-Range" battery vehicle, meaning the dealership falsely advertised this vehicle in order to increase the price, lying to potential customers and potentially stealing thousands of dollars from unwitting customers. When this obvious fact was pointed out to the sales rep and manager, this was taken into account and mention this would be reported to the dealership manager who would then say that this was a standard problem on the computer software and was not able to rectify this on their listing to reflect actual car facts or give any price reduction due to this particular fact. 

The vehicle's CarFax indicates it is a 2018 Tesla Model 3, with no previous accident history, as indicated on the vehicle's CarFax was purchased at a Car Auction in New York by Brickell Luxury Motors. Upon initial inspection, the vehicle had visible damage to the front bumper, with a crease in the center of the bumper indicating previous damage, and a "cap" was also damaged on the front bumper as per photos taken. This noticeable damage to the front bumper, confirms previous damage to the vehicle which was omitted from the CarFax report. When questioned about this obvious fact, the sales rep said "many cars are purchased at auctions" and acted as if they had no idea about the vehicle in general, saying "we don't have these type of electric vehicles available often".

There was also very visible unprofessional repair to a crack in the center of the front bumper, which seemed to have been patched over by some type of un-aesthetic repair, leaving a noticeable mark on the middle of the bumper. This again indicated the vehicle has been involved in some sort of unreported previous accident or unreported repaired damage, as the vehicle's CarFax indicated no previous damage.

I do not see why a luxury dealership of such caliber, with at least 1.5 million dollars worth of luxury inventory on their lot, would allow having a damaged vehicle displayed on their lot for sale at top price.

After overcoming these shortcomings and receiving reassurance from the dealer the defects on the front bumper would be repaired prior to delivery. 

I offered 20% down, on an overpriced previously damaged vehicle. I submitted a handwritten offer of $36,000 out the door for the vehicle, which was presented to the manager by the sales rep, after several minutes, the manager called us into the office and now had $37,000 written over the original $36,000 offer. You would think that when a dealership manager sees the term "Out The Door", written with on an offer, they recognize this is a standard industry term used to describe the total price of the vehicle including all taxes, dealer fees, and registrations/ transfer fees. So no further fees or value is added to this final offer agreed.

After going through the entire process, I indicated I would put down approx 20% of the total vehicle cost, and the rest would be financed, the financing was approved and a credit full check was pulled on my credit record, each Credit inquiry on a personal credit record has a direct impact on the score of the persons' long term credit record.

When the final steps of the sales and financing process came, even though I had put down $7k on a $37,000 agreed out the door price for this vehicle, the dealership still went ahead and added the extra dealer fees and tax on top of the already agreed "Out the Door" Price. They did not seem to understand we had already made a handshake agreement for the total price of the vehicle at $37,000 and proceeded to present me with a final offer over $42,000 all in. This completely blind-sighted me as we had already gone through extensive negotiations with multiple levels of staff over multiple hours.

This obviously became a serious problem when the dealership manager proceeded to give me a presentation on why the price had suddenly increased from the agreed $37,000 out the door to now almost $43,000 out the door. meaning an increase of $6,000 previously not discussed, presented at the very last minute. This kind of gave me a very hard decision to make, either accept the sudden increase or abandon what seemed like fruitful negotiations that had gone on to this point on a vehicle I was still considering after the initial issues, not to mention an impact on my long-term credit profile. It suddenly seemed as if the dealership did not have my best interest in mind.

In "Good Faith" negotiations, dealers must disclose all previously known vehicle history and report any unknown visible prior damage, especially businesses of this high caliber that uses the word "Luxury" in their name, one would expect more, however, it seems like Brickell Luxury Motors resorts to the same predatory practices, lying and deceiving clients like other bad actors in this industry. This was definitely not a "Luxury Experience".

If this dealership is willing to buy such vehicles at Auction from other States, and retail them damaged for full price, imagine what they may be doing with the high-value Luxury Cars you may want to purchase from this dealership. Imagine going through this type of experience with your next $150,000 vehicle purchase from BLM. Bad Experience, save yourself the hassle. Buyer Beware. Be Very Careful. 

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